government

President Obama Friday declared an emergency in Washington state because of wildfires, freeing up more federal aid.

The Oregon Transportation Commission adopted new rules Friday requiring railroads to increase the amount of information they share with state officials. Months in the making, the rules come in response to concerns over the state’s readiness for oil train spills and fires.

Emergency responders will now get immediate notification from railroads for incidents involving hazardous materials. Those notifications include information about the type, quantity and placement of any materials on the train.

KUOW Illustration

How well do you know the Seattle City Council district you live in? In 2013, Seattle voted to split the city into seven districts to elect council members with two more members elected at-large. This year will be the first election under that system.

Liban Ahmed handles baggage at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. He says he'll use the extra money to buy a car, save for college and visit his mom in Mogadishu, who he has not seen in 15 years.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

About 4,700 workers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are about to get a big raise. The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that the city of SeaTac’s $15 an hour minimum wage applies to airport employees.

Fires burning across Washington state have grown to about 390,000 acres and killed three firefighters. Now elected officials are asking the Obama administration for federal money to help fight them.

Masooma, pictured with her children, recounted the events of pre-dawn March 11, 2012 when she says a U.S. soldier rampaged through two villages killing 16 people, mostly children. Staff Sergeant Robert Bales pleaded guilty to the massacre.
AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Adam Ashton, military reporter for the Tacoma News Tribune, about Sgt. Robert Bales and how the military evaluates the mental health of their troops. A new report from the military shows Bales exhibited warning signs of potentially violent behavior before killing 16 Afghan civilians in 2012.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times reporter Will Drabold about his investigation into the Department of Social and Health Services which revealed issues in staffing and funding that put Washington kids at risk. 

The USS Seawolf in Unalaska Bay on Aug. 14, 2015.
KUCB Photo/John Ryan

A U.S. Navy submarine pulled into Unalaska Bay near the town landfill Friday morning. The sub made no contact with the Port of Dutch Harbor, according to Harbor Master John Days.

It did communicate with the Royal Pacific, a boat hauling wastewater from the Unisea fish-processing plant, as they were crossing paths.

The Washington Attorney General's office has taken action against Orona & Associates in Everett, the business advertised here.  A consent decree assessed $8,000 in civil penalties and $1,500 in costs and fees.
courtesy Northwest Immigrant Rights Project

A crackdown on scammers offering fraudulent immigration services found hundreds of victims, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Wednesday in announcing action against four businesses.

Ferguson said fraudulent “consultants” known “notarios públicos” as are preying on new, vulnerable immigrants.

The Washington State Patrol is responsible for guarding the governor and his wife. But audio recordings obtained through public records reveal the Patrol’s Executive Protection Unit is also concerned about protecting the governor politically -- at least when it comes to driving him in a gas-guzzling SUV.

Prison bars file photo.
Flickr Photo/Neil Conway (CC BY2.0)

A few years ago Theresa Nolte fell in love with Kelly Beard, an inmate at the Monroe Correctional Complex. Nolte was a prison staffer.

Consensual or not, sexual contact between prison staffers and inmates is illegal.

Oregon Independent Party Gains Major Status

Aug 17, 2015

The Oregon Secretary of State’s office announced Monday the Independent Party of Oregon has enough voters to achieve the same status as Democrats and Republicans.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

David Hyde talks with Associated Press journalist Kristen Wyatt about new lawsuits aimed to take down the legal pot industry.

After a record-long session, Washington Governor Jay Inslee and legislative leaders still aren’t done. They’ll resume talks on schools funding on Monday afternoon in SeaTac after an unprecedented ruling from the state Supreme Court.

Erica C. Barnett, Joel Connelly, Ijeoma Oluo and Bill Radke breakdown the week's news.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

We’ll play you audio from Saturday’s rally with Bernie Sanders which was disrupted by two Black Lives Matter activists and debate the meaning of the protest and the subsequent reaction. Also, the Washington Supreme Court fines us $100,000 a day for failing to fund education – will that finally force the legislature to act? And should you get a $124 ticket for getting stuck in an intersection and “blocking the box”?

Bill Radke explores those stories and more of this week’s news with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo and journalists Joel Connelly and Erica C. Barnett.

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