education funding

Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

Hundreds of students at Garfield High School in Seattle walked out of class Thursday to protest district cuts that could cost the school a teacher.

Flickr Photo/Kamera Kizi (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks to Tacoma News Tribune columnist Peter Callaghan about the progress state lawmakers have made on finding a way to fund public schools in Washington state.

Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The state Supreme Court will not get the K-12 education funding plan it demanded from the state Legislature by the end of April.

The court called for the plan in January after finding that state lawmakers had not made enough progress toward amply funding basic education as required by the state Constitution.

Flickr Photo/Christos Tsoumplekas

School districts across Washington are examining how they’ll be affected by the state’s loss of its No Child Left Behind waiver and resulting loss of flexibility over how they spend $38 million in federal funding. That amount represents 20 percent of the federal Title 1 funding for the state's highest-poverty schools.

The staff at 31 Seattle public schools have voted down their schools’ proposed budgets to protest job cuts the district is calling for this fall.

Ingraham High School administrative secretary Mary Smith said her school's staff rejected a budget that would turn the assistant secretary, attendance specialist and fiscal specialist from full-time to half-time positions.

Flickr Photo/Kelli Smith

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle attorney Phil Talmadge about the State Supreme Court's ruling that state lawmakers are not on track to fully fund basic education by 2018.

Talmadge is a former state supreme court justice and former state senator.

The Washington state Supreme Court has found that state lawmakers have once again failed to make significant progress toward fully funding basic education, and ordered the Legislature to submit a K-12 funding plan by April 30.