Canada

The Record: Wednesday, Feb. 3, Full Show

Feb 3, 2016
microphone
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A Washington state lawmaker has resigned over allegations he misrepresented his military record. We don't know all the facts yet, but this does come up a lot. How often do people lie about military service and how much does it matter?

Also, Los Angeles has Koreatown, New York has Little Italy. Seattle has the International District, but one of our guests argues that we should also have an Africatown.

And the X-Files are back in Vancouver, B.C., which is not as big a deal as it used to be and we'll show you why.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Canada's Great Bear Rainforest.
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ubjonq

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new deal to protect millions of acres of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia.

Vancouver, B.C,
Flickr Photo/Cliff Hellis (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dxchD5

Bill Radke talks with CBC Radio pop culture columnist Kim Linekin about how The X-Files helped turn Vancouver, B.C. into a thriving hub for TV and film productions.

A landmark deal 10 years in the making will protect 9.1 millions acres of Canadian rain forest on the Pacific Coast of British Columbia.

The protected area in the Great Bear Rainforest is about half the size of Ireland.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a recent verdict which found a Toronto police officer guilty of attempted murder. In 2013, Constable Jame Forcillo shot and killed 18-year-old Sammy Yatim on a streetcar. 

People welcome Syrian refugees at the Toronto airport on Dec. 9, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Domnic Santiago (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1PpLV5f

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn about the difficulties Vancouver is facing resettling refugees, the new symbol for the falling Canadian dollar, and prosecution costs from the 2011 Stanley Cup riot. Quinn is the host of CBC One radio show On the Coast and columnist for the Globe and Mail.

Canadian dollar, or 'loonie'
Flickr Photo/Jackman Chiu (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1ZpVqsL

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn about the plunging Canadian dollar and a new study that proves Canadians are more polite than Americans. Quinn hosts On the Coast on CBC Radio One in Vancouver. He also writes a weekly column for the Globe and Mail.  

Bill Radke speaks with Globe and Mail national correspondent Justine Hunter about a tent camp in Victoria, B.C. that's moving inside. 

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Flickr Photo/John McCallum (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1QPN3Sh

Bill Radke talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the "news maker of the year" in Canada. Hint: He got a favorable photo spread in Vogue magazine.

Canadian dollar, or 'loonie'
Flickr Photo/Jackman Chiu (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1ZpVqsL

David Hyde speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the continued fall of the Canadian dollar. Palmer also gives an update on plans for a sewage treatment plant in Victoria, B.C.

Canada's new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged to bring in 25,000 Syrians within a matter of months, but it's not just his government that's handling the massive task of resettling the refugees.

Across Canada, churches, communities and businesses are all pitching in, as are many individuals, who are privately sponsoring Syrian families and covering most of their needs for the first year.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the impact of indigenous boarding schools. Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission has released their final report and recommendations on the issue and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised a blueprint for national reconciliation. 

b
Todd Karol

What was it about Canada this year? A new prime minister, an attempt at taking already legendary niceness up a notch? These stories caught our eye — in a good way.

1. New prime minister makes waves

Bringing Syrian refugees to the U.S. has become an especially contentious issue. In Canada, however, they're being welcomed with open arms.

Roughly 600 Syrians from refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon will arrive by plane in Canada this evening. They're the first of 25,000 Syrians the new Canadian government wants to resettle by the end of February.

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Flickr Photo/John McCallum (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1QPN3Sh

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's first address to the nation. 

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