business

For many online retailers, Cyber Monday is likely to be the peak shopping day of the year. To handle the onslaught of orders, Amazon has begun rolling out a new robot army.

The Amazon order-fulfillment center in Tracy, Calif., is more than a million square feet — or 28 football fields, if you prefer — filled with orange and yellow bins flying this way and that on conveyor belts. Chances are, if you ordered a bunch of items in the San Francisco Bay Area recently, Amazon put that box together here.

About 200 people marching through downtown Seattle disrupted black Friday holiday shopping and the city’s traditional Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

They marched in the rain, blocking intersections and streets, in protest of a Missouri grand jury’s decision this week to not indict a police officer who fatally shot a black teenager.

The protesters flooded into Westlake shopping center, taking over escalators and lying down on the floor. Seattle police ultimately turned shoppers away.

Black Friday sales seem to start earlier and earlier every year. But what makes us want to rush to the stores or online to snap up the best bargains?

Those wall-to-wall TV ads — and the holiday season itself — are tapping into a very primitive part of our brains.

"There is more of a sport to Black Friday shopping, and people expect some deal, but they aren't likely to get the best deal on a particular item because the best deal may have already happened six months ago," says Sucharita Mulpuru, a retail analyst with Forrester Research.

Several Northwest Christmas tree growers are trying to push containers full of evergreens through the Northwest’s delayed seaports.

Coal export terminals are in the permitting process in both Washington and Oregon, but they face heavy opposition.

Northwest cranberry farmers are struggling from a North American oversupply of the fruit.

Some of the world’s largest Christmas tree farms are right here in the Northwest. Some are harvesting about 20,000 trees a day.

Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/SLV Native (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Eric Schinfeld about how Washington business are being affected by a work slowdown at the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma. Schinfeld is oresident of the Washington Council on International Trade.

Then, Marcie Sillman gets reaction from International Longshore and Warehouse Union spokesperson Craig Merrilees.

Astroturfing is when interest groups run a campaign that’s designed to look like it’s grassroots in nature.

REDMOND, WASHINGTON -- Two young Indian co-workers face off across the table at a café on Microsoft’s main campus. The challenge? Who can eat the most panipuri: bite-sized Indian street food made up of a fried shell stuffed with spicy potatoes.

Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson said his company wants to nearly double its footprint at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Microsoft's fate in the sea of successful tech giants.

Courtesy of Washington Healthplanfinder

Open enrollment for health insurance started last Saturday. It’s the time for people to buy a health plan, or to renew what they already have. And for the first time this year, the state’s health exchange is offering health plans for small businesses. 

A slowdown at West Coast ports is beginning to stifle the flow of goods in and out of the Northwest.

Street Newspapers On The Rise In The Northwest

Nov 14, 2014

In every major West Coast city, people who are homeless or living in transitional housing are selling street newspapers on the corners.

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