business

The Pike Place Market will expand westward, toward the waterfront.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Pike Place Market is going to expand westward.

On Monday, a Seattle City Council committee agreed to pay $34 million from the general fund to build new vendor stalls, senior housing and a public plaza.

The other half of the money comes from tax breaks, grants and philanthropists. The project is part of a larger effort to reconnect the market with the waterfront.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols has more.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Schneier, author of the new book, "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles To Capture Your Data and Control Your World."

This Week's News Calls For New Leadership

Mar 13, 2015
File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Is a shakeup of the Seattle Police Department’s top ranks a sign of progress? Should a franchise be considered big business when it comes to Seattle's $15 minimum wage law? And is there hope for Seahawks fans soaked by Super Bowl ticket scammers?

Luke Burbank steps in for KUOW's Bill Radke to make sense of those stories and more of the week's news with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on Thursday to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments..
KUOW photo/John Ryan

Student activists at the University of Washington urged the Board of Regents on Thursday to dump the university's investments in coal.

Why The Nuclear Energy World Is Thinking Small

Mar 13, 2015

In the world of nuclear power, one technology is generating debate: factory-produced reactors that are no bigger than a house.

These "small modular reactors" are designed to produce power on the scale of a single factory or business campus. That’s a big departure from a traditional nuclear plant — the kind that's powerful enough to run an entire metropolis and big enough to be seen from miles away.

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to state Rep. Tana Senn, D-Mercer Island, about her bill that passed the state House that would amend the Equal Pay Act, ensuring that employers can't punish employees for talking about their salary.

SEATTLE -- Port officials are standing behind their controversial decision to host Shell Oil's Arctic drilling fleet, despite protests, legal action and a city-led investigation.

The Port of Seattle signed a lease earlier this month that has caused a stir among some citizens and elected officials. At a public meeting Tuesday the port's commissioners got an earful when they opened the floor to testimony about their decision to lease Terminal 5 to Foss Maritime, which will then host Shell Oil's Arctic drilling fleet.

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Starbucks is set to expand mobile ordering to its Pacific Northwest stores. KUOW's Kim Malcolm talks with retail analyst Brian Sozzi of Belus Capital Advisors about why the not-just-coffee company wants to move you out of the line and onto your phone.

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the US District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Lawyers for the International Franchise Association and five local franchisees were in court Tuesday asking that portions of Seattle’s new $15-an-hour minimum wage law be barred from taking effect.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

Ross Reynolds talks with Kristi Heim, executive director of Washington State's China Relations Council, about local exports to China and the growing demand for fresh fruit and baby products. 

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about Apple's big event on wearable technology. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Lawyers for the city of Seattle will be in federal court Tuesday to defend the city’s new $15-an-hour minimum wage law.

An NPR/ProPublica investigation this week found that Americans injured on the job have had their worker compensation benefits slashed over the past decade. Washington is one of just a few states that bucked a national trend to roll back workers comp. Kim Malcolm talks with Jerry Cornfield, state government reporter for the Everett Herald, about what sets Washington state's system apart.

Ross Reynolds speaks with North Bonneville Mayor Don Stevens about their city's pot store. It will become the  first government-owned pot store in the nation, possibly the world, when it opens on Saturday.

Alaska plane at Sea-Tac Airport.
Flickr Photo/hermitsmoores (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington Post reporter Reid Wilson about the rivalry between Delta Airlines and Alaska Airlines and what that means for Sea-Tac's expansion.

We also hear from Alaska's senior vice president of communications and external reltaions, Joe Sprague, about what his take on the competition.

Delta Airlines declined to comment at this time.

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