Ten years ago, Stephenie Meyer put a twist on the whole boy-meets-girl thing.

In her young adult novel Twilight, girl meets vampire and, later, werewolf. The supernatural romance between Bella and Edward sparked a saga that includes four best-selling books translated into more than 50 languages and five blockbuster movies.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman gets a reading recommendation from librarian Nancy Pearl, who suggests that if you are a fan of Terry Pratchett, you may like "The Murdstone Trilogy: A Novel," by Mal Peet.

Children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, points to a 3-year-old fan Marcus Gabrielli as he signed autographs in New York.
AP Photo/Mike Appleton

Did Maurice Sendak, author of "Where The Wild Things Are," talk to kids about his work?

It was 1991, and Sendak had come into the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds on “Saturday Afternoon.”  

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, "White Butterfly," had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

Such a little bandaid for a big ouch!
Courtesy Bond Huberman

When writer Eula Biss was pregnant, she absorbed some of the fear about vaccines.   

“Fear is almost contagious itself, and so I caught some fears,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Stephanie Clifford about her New York Times best seller “Everybody Rise,” the story of  a 26-year-old from Maryland who tries to fit in with the wealthy New York elite. It's a contemporary take on Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth". 

Clifford  based her book on her experience of culture shock after moving from Seattle to the East Coast. When she’s not writing novels Clifford is a a New York Times reporter covering courts.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks to history and book buff Nancy Pearl about a fresh take on Britain's 19th and early 20th century: "Parallel Lives: Five Victorian Marriages," by Phyllis Rose.

Seattle mystery author J.A. Jance.
KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

On a damp gray morning, J.A. Jance sits inside the Seattle Mystery Bookshop. Her cheery yellow blazer stands out in all the gloom.

Jance chuckles as she points out a large shelf devoted to her books.

If you read mystery novels, chances are you’ve run across one of them. Jance has published 51 novels, along with novellas and short stories. They’re divided into four distinct series; three are set in Arizona, where Jance grew up.

Ross Reynolds talks to Porter Erisman, a former vice president at Alibaba -- the biggest e-commerce site on the Web -- about his new book, "Alibaba's World: How A Remarkable Chinese Company is Changing the Face of Global Business."

File photo: diver swimming with dolphins
Flickr Photo/Steve Jurvetson (CC BY 2.0)

Bestselling author Susan Casey was a former competitive swimmer with extensive experience in ocean swimming. So it surprised her when she realized she had never swum with dolphins.

That changed when she unexpectedly encountered a pod of Spinner dolphins during a solo swim off Maui. Casey was so affected by the experience that she spent the next few years researching dolphins around the world. The result is her latest book, “Voices in the Ocean: A Journey into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins.”    

Marcie Sillman talks to book maven Nancy Pearl about an unusual take on the late culinary guru Julia Child's life: a graphic biography from Jessie Hartland called "Bon Appetit! The Delicious Life of Julia Child."

Over the weekend, vampires were afoot in a small town on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Fans of a bestselling teen vampire romance series flooded into the town of Forks from all over the country.

Ross Reynolds interviews Bainbridge Island writer Jonathan Evison about his fourth novel, “This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!," which centers around a mysterious phone call about an Alaska cruise made to a 79-year-old woman. Evison also talks about the influence of fellow Northwest novelist Maria Semple on his work and what it’s like to have Paul Rudd play him in the upcoming film based on his last book, “The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving."

Jason Schmidt and his dad around 1976 at their house on Hayes Street in Eugene, Oregon.
Courtesy of Jason Schmidt

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading recommendation from librarian Nancy Pearl: "A List of Things That Didn't Kill Me," by Seattleite Jason Schmidt. Pearl says there's usually too much "me" in memoirs, but this one defied her expectations in a good way. 

Read an excerpt from Schmidt's book as part of KUOW's Seattle Stories Project: "I Couldn't Save My Dad From AIDS, So I Saved Myself Instead."

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

First-time novelist Elisabeth Egan spent most of her career writing about other people's books as a literary editor for magazines and websites. That provided the fodder for Egan's "A Window Opens," about a literary editor who finds what she thinks might be the job of her dreams.

Nancy Pearl talks with KUOW's Marcie Sillman about the novel and what makes an author's first book great.