787

The Boeing 787 lands at Seattle's Boeing Field after its maiden flight from Paine Field in Everett.
The Boeing Company

Five years ago this Monday, Boeing's 787 flew for the first time. The Dreamliner, billed as Boeing's game-changing plane, roared into the sky above Everett at 10:27 a.m.

Now another milestone approaches: Boeing says 2015 is the year it makes its first profit per plane on the 787 line.

NTSB's Joseph Kolly, holds an fire-damaged battery casing from the Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Boston's Logan Airport, at the NTSB laboratory in Washington, D.C., Jan. 24, 2013.
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

A report from the National Transportation Safety Board says Boeing, its contractors and the Federal Aviation Administration share the blame for a fire in a 787's lithium-ion battery at Boston's Logan Airport two years ago. That fire was one of two incidents that led to the grounding of the Dreamliner fleet in 2013.

The NTSB said the fire on the tarmac at Boston Logan was the result of a short-circuit in a single battery cell. It resulted in smoke, which Boeing said would be a one in 10 million event. But then it spread to other cells, causing a wave of extreme heat known as a thermal runaway and fire.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The Federal Aviation Administration failed to properly test the lithium ion batteries on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a report released on Wednesday. The report said that the FAA relied too much on Boeing for technical expertise.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says it will have to wait until sometime in 2016 to turn a profit on the 787 Dreamliners line.

By that time, the aerospace says developing the game-changing plane will cost the company more than $25 billion. There was a time when Boeing thought it would take $5 billion to develop the new plane.

Boeing Photo

Japan Airlines has yet again grounded one of its Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets after the plane's lithium ion battery started smoking.

Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

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Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

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When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

Credit Airbus Industrie

The Paris Air Show opens today. It’s where manufacturers show off their new planes – and where Boeing and Airbus try to best each other.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

This story was last updated on Saturday, April 20, 2013.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed it has accepted Boeing's proposed fix to the 787 battery system. It says next week it will issue instructions to operators for making changes to the aircraft.

Courtesy/Boeing

Boeing's 787 certification flight has landed.

The flight was Boeing's final certification test for the battery system it redesigned following smoke and fire incidents in January. Boeing Co. said the test would show the Federal Aviation Administration that the new system performs as intended "during normal and non-normal flight conditions."

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says a 787 Dreamliner destined for LOT Polish Airlines will take the certification test that could return the 787 fleet to the skies worldwide.

Boeing

The Boeing Co. unveiled what executives called a "proposed permanent solution to the 787 battery issue" Thursday  night. The company’s 787 fleet has been grounded for two months because of safety concerns over the plane’s lithium-ion batteries. Two batteries in the fleet’s first 50 planes have had smoke and fire incidents.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

Last Updated: March 12, 2013 5:30 p.m. 

In a statement, the FAA said Boeing could go ahead with its plan to test a redesigned battery system for the 787. The FAA also gave the green light to limited flights for two aircraft that will have test versions of the new systems.

The Boeing Company

Outside the Boeing plant in Everett, newly assembled 787s sit ready for delivery. The lineup includes new planes for LOT Polish Airlines, Japan Airlines and All Nippon Airways.  Inside, the production line rolls on despite this week’s setbacks for the company’s newest jetliner. Dreamliner number 94 stands at the front of the line. It’s an order for Thomson Airways, which is set to be the first British airline to fly the Dreamliner.

All Nippon Airways 787s
AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi

The Federal Aviation Administration is grounding all Boeing 787 Dreamliners in the US. That’s after a 787 in Japan was forced to make an emergency landing Wednesday because of a battery problem.