The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

Subscribe to The Record podcast!

Use iTunes | Use another player

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways to Connect

Bellevue High School fans cheer during the first half of the team's Class 3A high school football championship game against Eastside Catholic, Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you think high school, do you think math class? Or do you think about the Friday night lights, the pep rallies and the spirit days?

Let's face it, high school sports are big in this country. By placing such a big emphasis on sports, some schools are sending kids the wrong message, said Amanda Ripley, an education journalist and author.

Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

The viaduct is closing tomorrow for two weeks and it means you can play ping pong at Westlake park.

Also, the outcry over Bellevue High School's football recruiting spotlights a bigger problem; sports are way too important in our schools. So says our guest later this hour.

And Capitol Hill is changing and putting a landmark of outreach to gay teenagers at risk.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Supports of Capitol Hill's Lambert House march in the 2008 Pride parade.
Flickr Photo/Angela Stefanski (CC BY NC2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/51aHcy

Bill Radke speaks with Alan Andrews-Katz about why he is helping the Lambert House stay on Capitol Hill. The house provides services and support to LGBTQ youth. For 25 years, the Lambert House has been located in a Victorian home on Capitol Hill. The owner is selling. Lambert House has until the end of the year to raise $2 million. 

Why Donald Trump could be good for America

Apr 28, 2016
Donald Trump.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington political science professor Christopher Parker about his prediction that Donald Trump will be the GOP presidential nominee and why that is a good thing for America. 

KUOW control room studio
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bellevue High School dominates Washington state football. But did they break the rules?

Also, why wouldn't you take paid parental leave if you have it coming? Because your boss and co-workers will penalize you for it.

And a Seattle researcher thinks he knows what causes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and he's working on preventing it.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Bellevue running back Isaiah Gilchrist, left, leaps to avoid a tackle attempt by Eastside Catholic's Noah Failauga during the first half of the Class 3A high school football championship Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with investigator and former federal prosecutor Carl Blackstone and Bellevue Wolverines Booster Club president John Connors about the recent investigation into Bellevue High School's football program.

Courtesy of Terry Miles, Pacific Northwest Stories Network

Bill Radke speaks with Terry Miles, executive producer of the podcast Tanis, about chasing the myth of Tanis and why some think it may be hidden near the Puget Sound.

Students on the 7th floor of Koerner Library, University of British Columbia.
Flickr Photo/UBC Library (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7x9qat

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new rule being considered by the University of British Columbia. The university is considering a ban on all professor-student romantic relationships. The University of Washington allows professors to date students if there's no conflict of interest. 

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "Daydreams of Angels," by Heather O'Neill.

The Record: Tuesday, April 26, full show

Apr 26, 2016

Why are some local parents just now finding out that their kids school drinking water tested high for lead almost a year ago?

Also, you'll meet a Seattle chef who used to think he couldn't make a living cooking high end southern food.

Plus Tony Ventrella running for congress and what the new concert lineup tells you about Bumbershoot. 

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist Charles Cross about the newly released lineup for Bumbershoot 2016. Whether you love or hate this year's lineup, Cross says Seattleites should be thankful for this music festival. 

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times transportation reporter Mike Lindblom about the mass transit proposal Sound Transit 3 and how the plan will reach residents in Everett. 

Bill Radke talks with (Tacoma) News Tribune reporter Debbie Cafazzo about the presence of lead in the drinking water at six schools in the Tacoma School District. Radke also talks with Tacoma resident Elizabeth Rudge. Her home is one of 1,700 that may have lead in the water supply.

Is it a problem when white chefs cook other people’s food?

Apr 26, 2016
Angela Garbes, food writer at The Stranger.
Courtesy of Angela Garbes

When you go to a restaurant that touts itself as Korean, French, Mexican or Italian—it’s hard to know exactly what that means. And you might accidentally be stepping into murky food politics by going to one. How? If the chef is white and making money off the cuisine of people of color.

Bill Radke talks with longtime Seattle sports anchor Tony Ventrella about his campaign to unseat six-term Republican Congressman Dave Reichert.

Pages