Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 4:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. on KUOW
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, Bill Radke

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi–faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened–to news radio program in the country.

For A Resume, Type Font Matters

6 hours ago

Before you even get your foot in the door of your next job, your resume can say a lot about you — starting with typeface.

"Using Times New Roman is the typeface equivalent of wearing sweatpants to an interview," Bloomberg says in an article in which it turns to typography experts to ask which typefaces work and which don't.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tyson Foods, the country's biggest poultry producer, is promising to stop feeding its chickens any antibiotics that are used in human medicine.

It's the most dramatic sign so far of a major shift by the poultry industry. The speed with which chicken producers have turned away from antibiotics, in fact, has surprised some of the industry's longtime critics.

For decades, the farmers who raise chickens, pigs and cattle have used antibiotics as part of a formula for growing more animals, and growing them more cheaply.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In this photo provided by Azim Afif a man approaches the scene after an avalanche triggered by a massive earthquake swept across Everest Base Camp, Nepal on Saturday, April 25, 2015.
Azim Afif via AP

Bill Radke talks with Kurt Hunter of Seattle's Madison Mountaineering. Their team of 15 climbers were near Mount Everest's Camp 2 when the earthquake struck, sending an avalanche that killed a base camp medic.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On April 27, 1865, the steamboat Sultana exploded and sank while traveling up the Mississippi River, killing an estimated 1,800 people.

The event remains the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history (the sinking of the Titanic killed 1,512 people). Yet few know the story of the Sultana's demise, or the ensuing rescue effort that included Confederate soldiers saving Union soldiers they might have shot just weeks earlier.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

Copyright 2015 Maine Public Broadcasting Network. To see more, visit http://news.mpbn.net.

Comcast Calls Off Merger With Time Warner

Apr 24, 2015
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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Lost Siblings Find Each Other On Dating App

Apr 24, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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