Ruby de Luna

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1994

Ruby de Luna is a features reporter at KUOW. She had originally planned to go into TV, but ditched the idea after discovering public radio.  Ruby has reported on immigrant communities. She currently covers health care issues.  

Ruby is a transplant from Taipei, Taiwan. She holds a BA in communication from Seattle Pacific University. 

In the age of computer/digital audio editing, Ruby is proud to be one of the few old–schoolers who can still edit tape with a razor blade. In her free time she practices her knife skills on new recipes. 

Ways to Connect

Medical residents Bryn Chowchuvech, Bari Laskow and Stephanie Ngo discuss strategy for making their spaghetti dish.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

You don’t expect to see doctors in a kitchen.

Normally you’d find newly minted doctors at Swedish Cherry Hill hospital seeing patients. Instead, a group of them is spending an afternoon chopping onions, red bell peppers and mushrooms under the instruction of Dr. Tanmeet Sethi.


Naloxone Syringe
Flickr Photo/VCU CNS (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/r3Msnd

Heroin addiction has no boundaries. Deaths from overdoses have gone up across Washington state, but in Snohomish County, the rates have gone up more than in King or Pierce Counties.

Totten has been homeless since May. He brings his laundry to the Hygiene Center in Pioneer Square.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The housing market is hot, and older Seattleites are feeling the squeeze. 

The new medical van for homeless people started seeing patients this week. The clinic is part of Seattle King county Public Health's Mobile Medical Program that started in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Seattle is bringing health care to homeless people by way of a medical van.

The van is actually a 39-foot RV that’s been customized into a compact medical office. It has an exam room, and a station for patients to check in and talk with the nurse.

But it’s more than a walk-in clinic. It’s a place to connect people with services they need, including mental health.


This winged water beetle at Nue on Capitol Hill tasted like a salt lick chased by an apple Jolly Rancher. Click through for images of reporter Ruby de Luna tasting the water beetle (which isn't on the menu, by the way.)
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

You can order water beetles the size of a Post-It note at Nue, a trendy restaurant on Capitol Hill. They’re full-bodied, winged, and you have to suck the meat from their abdomens.

Nearby at Poquitos, an upscale Mexican restaurant, are spicy chapulines, or grasshoppers, that taste vaguely of flour.

Activists and anarchists lived at 1643 King Street for at least 40 years. They called it the King Street Collective.
Courtesy of Ronni Tartlet

If this house could talk, what stories would it tell?

About the Irish-American couple that first owned it?

And the Japanese family sent to an internment camp?

Or the anarchists that played drums during the WTO protests?


Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rob Ketcherside (CC-BY-NC-ND) http://bit.ly/28QrplE

It’s been a rough week for Seattle-area hospitals. First, Virginia Mason’s accreditation is on the line. Meanwhile, a Skagit hospital lost a court fight related to abortion. And Northwest Hospital is facing a class action suit over charity care. 

Here's a breakdown of what's happening at each hospital.

The International Children's Park was built in 1981. It features a dragon sculpture by Gerard Tsutakawa.
Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/dYcjwA

The Seattle City Council is expected to vote Monday to rename a park in honor of the late Donnie Chin, Chinatown-International District’s beloved community activist and go-to guy.

The playground on 700 South Lane Street will be renamed the Donnie Chin International Children’s Park.

University of Washington faculty and students are protesting administrators' decision to cut 25 teaching assistant positions in the College of Arts and Sciences.

FAFSA form for student aid.
Flickr Photo/The Bent Tree (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4kSAPe

June is the month for college graduation, but for many homeless youth, college is beyond their grasp. The paperwork for college applications can be overwhelming and being homeless complicates that process.

When Clarissa Lunday applied for federal financial aid, she had to provide information about her homelessness. 


Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Dawna Hankins had a partial hysterectomy in 2008.

Before surgery her doctor offered to put in a surgical mesh to help with minor incontinence. She agreed.


The mural at Hummus Cafe, at North 85th Street and Greenwood Avenue North. Across the street, a similar restaurant, Mr. Gyro, was demolished by the blast.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

It’s been two months since a gas explosion shook up Seattle’s Greenwood neighborhood. Most businesses have reopened.

At Rosewood Guitar on 85th, owner Bill Clements coaxed his golden retriever, Jack the shop greeter, to sit still. He remembered the days after the explosion in March.  

One of the 24 units for homeless youth at Phoenix Rising, a place for young adults ages 18-25 needing shelter and treatment for addiction.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Homeless youth with substance abuse problems will have a place in King County to get help beginning this month.

A bus moves into traffic on Delridge Way in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

King County Metro plans to increase transit service in the next five years, and it plans to do so without adding more greenhouse gas emissions.

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