Ruby de Luna

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 1994

Ruby de Luna is a features reporter at KUOW. She had originally planned to go into TV, but ditched the idea after discovering public radio.  Ruby has reported on immigrant communities. She currently covers health care issues.  

Ruby is a transplant from Taipei, Taiwan. She holds a BA in communication from Seattle Pacific University. 

In the age of computer/digital audio editing, Ruby is proud to be one of the few old–schoolers who can still edit tape with a razor blade. In her free time she practices her knife skills on new recipes. 

Ways to Connect

A photo from a 2011 project by the Daily Kent Stater. "A chaplain came to say a prayer for Rene when she was moved to hospice Monday morning, September 19. John and a few of his children were present at this time."
Flickr Photo/Kristin Bauer Photography

Dying patients in hospice and nursing homes aren’t always getting the care they need during the last days of their lives.

In the future, mental health professionals may not be the only people spreading the word about suicide prevention.

The message could also come from people you’d least likely expect to be front-line educators on suicide awareness: pharmacists, firearm dealers, shooting range operators, and even Fish and Wildlife staff.

chocolate lw
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Listener Beth Ann Johnson asked Local Wonder about Seattle's chocolate industry, and reporter Ruby de Luna agreed to report. (We know. Tough assignment.)

The Seattle City Council has approved the mayor’s emergency plan to set up two so-called “safe lots” for homeless people with cars and RV’s to stay. 

Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rob Ketcherside (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The company behind a medical device that has caused deadly bacterial infections in Seattle will voluntarily recall its scopes.

A global outbreak of infections linked to scopes built by Olympus America started as early 2012. In the U.S., more than 140 patients have been infected. At Seattle's Virginia Mason, at least 39 people were infected and 18 died.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0) HTTP://BIT.LY/1ZPVQSL

Washington is going to take a different tack on reducing gun violence, Gov. Jay Inslee says: Treat it as a public health problem.

The clock is ticking for you to get health insurance coverage for 2016: You've got until the end of January, state officials say.

And remember: Not being covered will be expensive. The penalty is $695 per adult or up to 2.5 percent of the person’s income, whichever is greater.

That road was covered by 15 feet of snow in the Snoqualmie Pass area. (The road is still six feet under the excavator.) More than 112 inches of snow have fallen in the last seven days.
Washington State Department of Transportation

Update, 10 a.m., Dec. 26, 2015: The Washington state Department of Transportation tweeted early Christmas Day that Interstate 90 westbound had reopened. The eastbound lanes had reopened a few hours earlier.

snow ski: Chairlift at Alpental, Snoqualmie Pass
Flickr Photo/Jean-Pierre Chamberland (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1TiwShp

The Cascades saw heavy snowfall Tuesday night, and more of it is in the forecast. It’s a bonanza for skiers. But a power outage has affected some ski operations.

The weather has been causing problems for power lines at Snoqualmie Pass. 

Washington state law requires hospitals to screen patients for financial need before demanding payment. But that doesn’t always happen. Now courts are paying attention.

A ruling against Yakima Regional Medical and Cardiac Center highlights the problem.

Alfonoso Adinolfi at his office in Kent. Like many Americans with hepatitis C, Adinolfi didn't know he carried the virus until he was diagnosed in 1996.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Ask Alfonso Adinolfi how he got hepatitis C and he’ll point to his upper right arm. “Right there,” he says, “that tattoo.”

He’s lived with the blood-borne virus for decades since being infected, possibly with a dirty tattoo needle. He's one of about 10,000 baby boomers in King County who are thought to have hep C, though many may not know it. So if you were born between 1945 and 1965, Seattle-King County Public Health wants you to get tested.

washington state vaccination rates historic
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

Washington is prepared for infectious outbreaks — or so it seems.

But a new report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health says the state can do better.

The report evaluated states on indicators such as flu vaccine rates and needle exchange programs. These indicators are related to prevention, detection and response to outbreaks.

Dr. Uma Pisharody advises parents to cut back on sugar in their kids’ diets, even sugar from unsweetened fruit juice.
Flickr photo/stvcr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Juice boxes and children seem to go together. Juice is often the main drink in school cafeterias and at kids’ parties and sports events. But at Swedish Medical Center's First Hill campus, fruit juice is now off the pediatric menu.

Group Health members are reacting to the news of Kaiser Permanente acquiring the Seattle-based cooperative.

KUOW’s Ruby de Luna went to Edmonds where she found loyal, longtime members.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jxhkty

The University of Washington is opening a new center focusing on the immune system and how to fight a range of infections and autoimmune disorders.

The hope is to find therapies for infections like Ebola and dengue fever, as well as therapies for autoimmune disorders.

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