Ross Reynolds

Host, The Record

Ross has been co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record since September 2013. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways To Connect

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Do we need zoos to promote conservation?

Kathryn Gillespie, a lecturer and member of the University of Washington’s critical animal studies working group, believes zoos should be phased out.

A gorilla at Port Lympne Wild Animal Park.
Flickr Photo/Willard (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Dr. Kathryn Gillespie, a lecturer and member of the University of Washington's critical animal studies working group about the case against zoos. 

Woodland Park Zoo
Flickr Photo/Jug Jones (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Mike Keele, the former director of elephants habitats at the Oregon Zoo, about why he feels zoos are important. 

Note: On Monday The Record will interview Dr. Kathryn Gillespie of the University of Washington. She explains why we should rethink zoos. 

UW To Give Minority Law Students A Helping Hand

Apr 16, 2015
University of Washington Law School
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kellye Testy, dean of the University of Washington Law School, about their Gregoire Fellows program. The program aims to boost diversity in the law school and the legal profession.

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and local attorney Bob Chadwell about the unfolding story of Washington state auditor Troy Kelley's indictment and what the legal ramifications could be.

Ross Reynolds talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist with the Vancouver Sun, about the controversy around an oil spill in Vancouver's English Bay.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Bill Schrier, former chief technology officer for the City of Seattle, about Tacoma's city-run internet and cable program and why the city is considering leasing it to a private company. 

Kathy Parrish as a child with her father, George Dean, at the YWCA pool in Seattle. The pool would be heated to a higer degree for polio patients at certain times.
Courtesy of Kathy Parrish

Ross Reynolds speaks with polio survivor and post-polio syndrome sufferer Kathy Parrish about her experience as a child with polio and the lasting impacts of the disease. Parrish was diagnosed with the disease in 1950, five years before the Jonas Salk vaccination was declared safe.

Paving the Fairview Avenue trestle, 1924
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with civil engineer Steve Muench about the state of city and state-owned transportation infrastructure in Seattle. Also, John Buswell, road structures manager for the Seattle Department of Transportation, talks about the Fairview Avenue North bridge, Seattle's last remaining bridge built on timber supports.

Supreme Court SCOTUS
Flickr Photo/Kjetil-Ree (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the decision by Alaska's attorney general to sign a letter with 15 other states advising the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. 

Flickr Photo/krupp (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Science fiction writer Isaac Asimov came up with three laws of robotics: a robot may not harm a human, a robot must obey humans and a robot must protect its own existence.

The Washington State Senate thinks even more regulating laws are necessary. On Wednesday senators voted unanimously to outlaw ticket bot computer software that buys up to 40 percent of the tickets for a concert before the public gets a stab at them.  This is only the latest effort to regulate robots and robotic software.

Scantron test
Flickr Photo/biologycorner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Katie Brown, an English language learner teacher at Shuksan Middle School in Bellingham, and Ross Reynolds talks to Lyon Terry, a fourth grade teacher at Lawton Elementary school in Seattle, about the challenges and advantages of the new Smarter Balanced Assessment test that students across Washington state will take this spring. 

Ross Reynolds talks to Crosscut's Knute Berger about what is lost when the state makes cuts to heritage sites like the State Capital Museum. 

A vivid portrait by Bll Schenck at the Tacoma Art Museum, a gift from the Haub family of Germany. The Haubs fell in love the Tacoma area in the 1950s and have collected an impressive collection of western art for decades.
Courtesy of Tacoma Art Museum

The story behind a massive new art collection in Tacoma is one of coincidences.

A wealthy German couple honeymooned in the area in the 1950s and then, years later, started collecting art of the American West.

Those paintings hung on walls near Tacoma and Wyoming and in Germany until recently, when the family bequeathed the stunning collection to the Tacoma Art Museum.

Safe Haven

In the mid-1950s, Erivan Haub, a German businessman, visited friends on Fox Island in Puget Sound. He immediately fell in love with the area. When he returned home to Germany, he enthused about the area to his girlfriend, Helga.

When they honeymooned here later, Helga said the area reminded her of growing up in the Black Forest in Germany.

A department at UW uses reverse engineering to improve flight technology based on nature.
Flickr Photo/Steve Edwards (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tom Daniel, director of the University of Washington Air Force Center of Excellence on Nature-Inspired Flight Technologies and Ideas, about how reverse engineering biology can improve flight technology.

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