Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 1985

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways to Connect

Pacific Northwest Ballet company members in George Balanchine's "The Nutcracker."
Angela Sterling

You take a chance any time you swap out an old favorite for something new.

Make a change during the holiday season and a nonprofit arts group could risk a significant portion of its annual income if tickets don’t sell. But play it safe and there’s the risk of producing stale art.

'The Prize: Who's in Charge of America's Schools?' by Dale Russakoff
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading recommendations from Nancy Pearl, "The Prize: Who's in Charge of America's Schools?" by Dale Russakoff. This new book chronicles one big effort in Newark, New Jersey to improve its public schools. 

photo by Lindsay Thomas

Long before Misty Copeland grabbed international headlines as the first African American woman named principal dancer at American Ballet Theater in New York, Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet was scouting for young people like Copeland: potential dancers who might not find ballet on their own.

music symphony
Flickr Photo/Jason Burrows (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Calling all Francophiles!

Front Row Center is headed to the Seattle Symphony on Dec. 6 for Gabriel Fauré's "Requiem," which the Symphony calls "a masterpiece of utter serenity".

The Seattle Symphony and Chorale will perform together for this all-French program which will include Olivier Messiaen's "Poèmes pour Mi," and Claude Debussy's "Danses Sacrée et Profane."

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with reading guru Nancy Pearl about a series of reprints of classic children's books, including "The Highly Trained Dogs of Professor Petit," by Carol Ryrie Brink.

Musician Wayne Horvitz.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

When Wayne Horvitz moved to Seattle, he was looking for a quiet place to chill out between road trips.

He never imagined himself in a symphony hall.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks to librarian Nancy Pearl about a favorite "comfort book" -- one that she chooses to read over and over again. This week's recommendation is "Larry's Party," by Carol Shields.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman gets a historically-inspired mystery novel suggestion from book maven Nancy Pearl. "Tabula Rasa," by Ruth Downie, is the latest in a series based on the history of the Romans in the British Isles.

A dancer and stager rehearse Loïe Fuller's 'Lily of the Nile.'
University of Washington/Steve Korn

One of the things that’s so exciting about dance is one of the things that can be most frustrating:

Dance is ephemeral.

It’s live, it’s in the moment, and then, poof, that dance you’ve just seen is a memory.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about a unique way of transmitting history: through poetry of the era. Pearl's reading recommendation this week is a new anthology from Michael Hulse and Simon Rae called "The 20th Century in Poetry."

Jim Woodring won the 2010 Stranger genius award in literature. Woodring is best known for his cartoonish animalish creations. This is a still from Frank in the 3rd Dimension, 2015
Frye Museum

Name the first genius that comes to mind.

Artist Leonardo da Vinci?

What about composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart?

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman gets a reading recommendation from librarian Nancy Pearl, who suggests that if you are a fan of Terry Pratchett, you may like "The Murdstone Trilogy: A Novel," by Mal Peet.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jason Andrews, CEO of Spaceflights Industries, about the booming space industry in the Northwest. 

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks to history and book buff Nancy Pearl about a fresh take on Britain's 19th and early 20th century: "Parallel Lives: Five Victorian Marriages," by Phyllis Rose.

Apples on one of the original trees in Piper's Orchard. The orchard was planted more than 100 years ago.
KUOW photo/Marcie Sillman

Seattle's Carkeek Park has a secret.

Hidden in plain sight, on a steep south-facing hillside, just a few hundred yards down a trail from the Environmental Learning Center, you’ll find Piper’s Orchard.