Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Justin Huertas, center, and fellow "Lizard Boy" cast members William A. Williams and Kirsten deLohr Helland.
Courtesy Seattle Repertory Theatre / Andry Laurence

Justin Huertas is one of those people who seemingly can do everything.

Only in his mid-20s, he’s already been a musician with the national tour of the hit Broadway show "Spring Awakening." He’s also performed Shakespeare and musical theater.

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about her pick of the week: a first novel by author Rebcecca Scherm titled, "Unbecoming."

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dr. Nathan White, an emergency room physician at Harborview Medical Center, about an injectable substance he created with UW bioengineers Suzie Pun and Leslie Chan. The product is in very early stages of testing, but White says it could help stop bleeding in trauma patients and save lives.

A summit with leaders of the member states of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement in 2010.
Wikipedia Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about why she supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Then, Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about why he's raising concerns about the TPP.

horse racing
Wikimedia Commons

Marcie Sillman talks with Doug Moore, executive secretary of Washington State's Horse Racing Commission, about trends in the industry and what the future of Emerald Downs could mean for horse racing in Washington.

Newlywed bride and groom stepping into car, circa 1955.  Sign in front passenger side window reads "Hold Her Tight."
MOHAI, Al Smith Collection, 2014.49

Seattle is a young city, young enough that most of its history can be traced through photographs.

Until recently though, most of those photos have been official portraits or documentation of public works projects like the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin.
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Marcie Sillman talks with Dan Rankin, who was transformed from sawmill owner and part-time mayor of Darrington to full-time leader of a community facing its greatest challenge after the deadly mudslide in nearby Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014.

Breast cancer: Radiographic marker in lumpectomy specimen
Flickr Photo/Ed Uthman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Joann Elmore, University of Washington professor of medicine, about the findings of her new study that suggest the results of breast cancer biopsy tests might not be accurate.

The site of the deadly Oso, Washington mudslide on March 22, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Washington State DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to David Montgomery, University of Washington geology professor, about his geological recommendations for the state after last year's Oso landslide and how much progress has been made since the slide.

Dr. Mary-Claire King
University of Washington/Mary Levin

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Dr. Mary-Claire King about her groundbreaking research that changed the way we treat breast cancer today. 

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman speaks with librarian Nancy Pearl about a new collection of short stories that caught her eye: "Single, Carefree, Mellow," by Katherine Heiny.

A still from the trailer for "Kill Team."
YouTube

Marcie Sillman talks with filmmaker Dan Krauss about his new documentary, "The Kill Team." The film features the story of Private Adam Winfield, who attempted to warn the military of war crimes against innocent civilians in Afghanistan. He later plead guilty to involvement in a killing and was sentenced for three years in prison.

Cheryl Stumbo at TEDx Seattle in 2013.
Flickr Photo/TEDx Seattle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman interviews Cheryl Stumbo, the subject of a short documentary film called "The Accidental Activist" premiering at Seattle's Jewish Film Festival. Stumbo became an activist for gun control after being wounded in the 2006 shooting at the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. 

Marcie Sillman talks with state Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, about his push for more transparency in government.

Also, Ross Reynolds gets the scoop on various transparency bills in the legislature from KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins.

A shot-down fire balloon reinflated by Americans in California.
Wikipedia Photo

On March 13, 1945, World War II came to the U.S. mainland when a Japanese bomb fell on Everett, Washington.

But no airplane dropped it: A hydrogen balloon launched from a beach on Japan’s Honshu island had carried the incendiary device thousands of miles in just three or four days. Once the 30-foot diameter balloon reached 30,000-35,000 feet, strong westerly winds of the upper atmosphere – the jet stream – carried it toward North America.

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