Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Dumi Maraire, the hip hop artist better known as Draze, will be performing at Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend.
Facebook Photo/Draze

Some of the roots of Seattle hip hop go back to Zimbabwe.

In 1968, Dumisani Maraire came to the University of Washington as an artist in residence to share the music of the Shona people. He was supposed to stay a year, but stayed and raised a family here. 

Now his two sons are active in Seattle’s hip hop scene: Tendai is half of Shabazz Palaces and Dumi Jr. is the hip hop artist “Draze.” Music was life for the Maraire family. 

Geoffrey McGrath delivers a petition bearing more than 125,000 signatures, urging Amazon to stop donating money to the Boy Scouts on May 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks with former scoutmaster Geoffrey McGrath about the president of Boy Scouts Of America's call for an end to the ban on openly gay adult leaders. 

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-area author Bev Harris about finding out that her 2004 book, "Black Box Voting: Ballot Tampering in the 21st Century," was among those listed in a declassified government document called "Bin Laden's Bookshelf."

Eli and Oliver Abrahamson at home in 2012.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Memorial Day weekend in the Seattle area means barbecues, camping trips and the annual Northwest Folklife Festival.

This four-day festival of folk traditions convenes again Friday, May 22, at the Seattle Center. Attendees can experience everything from do-it-yourself drum circles to square dancing to a bevy of string bands.

Three years ago, we introduced audiences to the Oliver and Eli Abrahamson, two boys who got their musical start busking at Folklife. At the time, they and their parents performed together as the Smalltime String Band.

Los Angeles
Flickr Photo/Ron Reiring (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with David Rolf of Service Employee's International Union 775 about Los Angeles' move to become the latest and largest American city to bump its minimum wage to $15 an hour.

A member of a fire crew. wildfire
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about an early start to the wildfire season in British Columbia.

The Polar Pioneer oil rig in Terminal 5 at the Port of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the Shell Arctic drilling rig newly docked at the Port of Seattle.

The iconic sculpture in McCaw Hall, home of the Pacific Northwest Ballet and Seattle Opera.
Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A new national survey ranks Seattle fourth in the nation when it comes to the number of nonprofit arts and culture organizations. That's higher than San Francisco or Minneapolis.

Longtime arts administrator Sue Coliton isn't surprised by that news.

Marcie Sillman talks to Nancy Pearl about a new planned trilogy that promises the same thrills and devotion as "Harry Potter." Pearl gives the first book in Edward Carey's series, "Heap House," two thumbs up. 

food delivery
Flickr Photo/Mark Turnauckas (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about their investigation into the practices of the online restaurant delivery service OrderAhead. 

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about new mental health policies and how the state will pay for them. 

The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 as seen from the east.
Flickr Photo/Washington DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Carolyn Driedger, a hydrologist and outreach coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, about what volcanologists have learned since Mount St. Helen's erupted 35 years ago and what other risks we face from Northwest volcanos.

Jennie Reed rides during qualification for an individual pursuit race in London on Feb. 18, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Marc (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Seattle-area resident Jennie Reed thought that after a world championship and two Olympics, she was ready to end her racing career in track cycling.

But when a fellow racer asked her to be part of the first-ever women's Olympic cycling team pursuit event, Reed decided to answer the call.

Studhorse is the name of this Methow Valley home in Central Washington state. Here, compact living pavilions surround outdoor living spaces.
Courtesy Benjamin Benschneider/Olson Kundig Architects / Olson Kundig Architects

Marcie Sillman speaks with Tom Kundig, owner and principal of Olson Kundig Architects, about how the landscape and culture of the Northwest influenced his newest award-winning building, and how Northwest architecture reflects our changing culture.

Meditators at Seattle's Frye Art Museum during a recent weekly session.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Five years ago, Frye Art Museum senior deputy director Jill Rullkoetter was casting about for the perfect public program to accompany an art exhibit called "Seance" which featured the work of German artist Albert Von Keller.

"He depicted images of women in seances, and kind of having these out of body experiences," Rulkoetter explains.

She wanted to create some kind of participatory event that would bring museum-goers into the spirit of this artist's work.

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