Marcie Sillman

Host, The Record

Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The new century brought new challenges. Marcie and Dave Beck created The Beat, Seattle's only broadcast program to focus specifically on arts and culture. In 2002, after more than 15 years as a daily host, Marcie decided to become a full-time cultural reporter. During her career, more than 100 of her stories have been heard on NPR's newsmagazines, as well as on The Voice of America. In 2005, she became KUOW's first special projects reporter. In this role, she produced in-depth audio portraits and documentary series about life and culture in the Puget Sound Region.

In September, 2013, Marcie was part of the team that created The Record, a daily news magazine focussed on the issues and culture of the Puget Sound region.

Ways To Connect

Harold Scoggins was nominated by Mayor Ed Murray for the role of Seattle's Fire Chief.
Office of Ed Murray

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle's new Fire Chief Harold Scoggins about how he became a firefighter.

Marcie Sillman talks with John Horvick, vice president of DHM Research, about a poll he conducted for Oregon Public Broadcasting on race relations in Washington and Oregon.

Shell's oil rig Kulluk became stranded in Kodiak, Alaska two years ago. This photo of the stranded vessel  was taken  Jan. 7, 2013.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Command (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez, reporter for Alaska Public Radio, about the resolution scolding Washington for protesting the Shell Artic drilling rig's arrival to Washington waters amid serious budget talks.

Ginny Gilder
Courtesy of Ginny Gilder

Marcie Sillman talks to Ginny Gilder, Olympic rower and co-owner of the WNBA's Seattle Storm, about her new book, "Course Correction."

Kurt Cobain, front man of the rock group Nirvana, is shown during a benefit concert at the Cow Palace in Daly City, Calif., April 9, 1993.
AP Photo/Sam Morris

Marcie Sillman talks with author and journalist Charles R. Cross about the new Kurt Cobain documentary, "Montage of Heck." 

Cary Chin works at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees this week that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dan Price, founder and CEO of Seattle-based credit card payment processing firm Gravity Payments. He recently raised his company's minimum wage to $70,000 a year for all employees.

Spectrum Dance Theater unveils a new "Carmina Burana" dance performance this month by its artistic director Donald Byrd.
Courtesy Spectrum Dance Theater

You may not know it by name, but you've likely heard Carl Orff's 1937 cantata, "Carmina Burana."

Chorale groups present it, commercials and films use it in soundtracks, and choreographers make dances to it. 

This spring, two Seattle dance companies will present works set to "Carmina Burana."

Scientists say progress is being made on technological replacements for animals in research and testing.
Flickr photo/Understanding Animal Research (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with Joanne Zurlo,  senior scientist with the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing at Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health, about how far science must go to develop alternatives to using animals in research and testing.

The Americas are seen from space on Earth Day 2014 in a photo captured by NOAA's GOES-East satellite.
NASA/NOAA/GOES Project

Marcie Sillman talks with Denis Hayes, local environmental activist and founder of Earth Day, about how the perfect name for the day was determined.

Who'll replace former Seattle City Council member Sally Clark?
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with political analyst C.R. Douglas about the eight finalists for a short-term Seattle City Council seat. (The full list, in alphabetical order: Jan Drago, Noel Frame, Sharon Lee, John Okomoto, Sharon Maeda, David Moseley, Sheley Secrest and Alec Stephens.) One will be appointed April 27.

Marcie Sillman talks to author Christine Dupres about her new book "Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed And Sustained Its Identity." 

A sign along Highway 29 between Fort St. John and Hudson's Hope, British Columbia, protests the proposed Site C dam.
Flickr photo/Emma Gilchrist, DeSmogCanada (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the British Columbia government's proposal to build another hydroelectric dam on the Peace River. 

This adorable bushtit in Seattle probably has no idea how much residents here would pay to support it.
Flickr Photo/Tom Talbott Jr. (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There is proof that we Seattleites love our native songbirds.

We put an economic value on them of at least $120 million a year, according to a recent study co-authored by a University of Washington professor. That’s roughly $12 per Seattleite and includes spending on birdseed, feeders and bird-supporting activities. 

Flickr Photo/Justin Grimes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Estevan Munoz-Howard of Honest Elections Seattle about Seattle Initiative 122. If it makes the November ballot, voters would be asked to approve a property tax hike to pay for an election reform package that includes giving voters vouchers worth $100 to donate to their favorite candidates.

Marcie Sillman talks to State Treasurer Jim McIntire about his proposal for a state income tax and overhaul of our current tax system to raise enough revenue to cover the state budget. 

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