Kara McDermott

Web Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2013

A former intern of the KUOW web department, Kara was hired as a web producer in 2013. She supports KUOW's web content with graphics, photography and video. 

She is a graduate of the University of Washington where she received a B.A. in English and certificates in editing and data visualization. Kara has worked as a freelance editor, soccer reporter and business office manager.

Ways To Connect

Melinda Jankord-Steedman and Phyllis Jantz at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center for the 'Week in Review' summer tour stop on Friday, May 29.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing – that issue is atop the minds of a lot of people in West Seattle and beyond.

KUOW's Week in Review broadcast live Friday from Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle's Delridge area to kick off the show's summer tour through all of the newly formed Seattle City Council districts (find yours on our district map). 

How well do you know the Seattle City Council district you live in? In 2013, Seattle voted to split the city into seven districts to elect council members with two more members elected at-large. This year will be the first election under that system.

To help navigate the new voting framework, we gathered demographic and other information on the new districts from Seattle's Department of Planning and Development and surveyed our listeners about their thoughts as they prepare to choose the new City Council.

Michelle, 26, and Benjamin, 27, spend time together on their bed at the back of their school bus. Michelle works as a janitor and Benjamin is employed as a dishwasher. They shower at community centers or at friend's homes.  Both of them consider themselve
KUOW Photo/Suzanne Tennant

Smoke rises from an old school bus parked in the Interbay area of Seattle – but it’s not coming from the tailpipe. Inside, Michelle, 26, is adding fuel to the wood-burning stove.

She lives in it with her boyfriend, Benjamin, 27. The couple prefer to call their lifestyle “houseless” instead of “homeless.” They consider themselves a part of a growing community of people getting by in vehicles across Seattle — some by choice, others as a last option.

KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

In 2002, when the Bush administration started pushing cities to adopt 10-year plans to reduce homelessness, Seattle/King County was already on board.

The feds suggested targeting chronic homelessness – typically the most visibly homeless people. But Seattle was ambitious and promised to end all homelessness by 2015.  

It’s been 10 years since the Seattle plan was launched, and the number of homeless people here has surged. This isn’t a national trend – across the county, homelessness has dropped by nearly a quarter.

Jessica Cote picks up her daughter, Anna Cote, at the Spartan Recreation Center in Shoreline after students were moved to that location for reunification Wednesday morning, Jan.7.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Updated at 4:11 p.m., 1/7/2015:

Reports of an armed male on school grounds sent Shoreline schools into lockdown on Wednesday morning, said Sergeant DB Gates of the King County Sheriff's Office.

Lockdown was lifted at 10:15 a.m., and students were sent home. Police stayed at schools until all students were safely released.

An armed male was reportedly seen at Meridian Park Elementary at Meridian Avenue North and North 175th. Police released a limited description of the man on Twitter: "Only suspect is a male, camo pants, dark hoodie. Unknown race, unknown age. Had a firearm."

A food service employee spotted the man; staff at the elementary school called 911 at 7:50 a.m. Children had been at the school as early as 6:30 a.m. for child care.

Glaciers set the North Cascades apart. Their runoff allows fish to navigate streams when rainfall is scarce. Their trickle gathers in rivers with currents powerful enough to generate hydroelectricity for millions of residents. But they're not powerful enough to withstand climate change.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When asked to describe South Lake Union in a word, KUOW’s Bill Radke chose “treacherous.”

“I rarely go to SLU so I forget it’s no longer deserted. Intersections that used to be a rolling stop now have cyclists and dogs and cycling dogs and chatting friends who just go!” he explained.

FIFA, the international soccer federation, has released its official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup.

It’s an artistic rendering of a woman looking up serenely as her long flowing locks are swept away from her face in graceful curves.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In a unanimous vote, to a standing ovation, the Seattle City Council approved a bill to increase the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

The crowd cheered “We made 15 possible!” after the reading of the vote tally in a meeting marked with passionate pleas for its passage from the public as well as council members.

Failed Amendments

The packed crowd of vocal proponents for the passage of the bill, many of whom gave their personal stories during the section of public comment, booed the failure of four amendments to the City Council’s plan.

Flickr Photo/PJMixer (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Affordable housing means spending 30 percent or less of household income on housing, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Kathleen O’Toole, formerly the Boston police commissioner and Ireland’s chief inspector, has been selected as Mayor Ed Murray's nominee as Seattle's top cop.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Seattle’s minimum wage could increase to $18.13 an hour within the next decade, according to Mayor Ed Murray's office.

Speaking at Town Hall on Thursday, Murray said that large businesses would have to pay their employees $15 an hour in three years.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and his Income Inequaltiy Committee have not yet reached an agreement in raising the minimum wage.

Murray was expected to announce an initial proposal for the City Council at a press conference Thursday afternoon, but said that though the committee had reached an agreement in principle, there was not yet a viable proposal.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

As the local community held Sunday church services a week after the devastating Oso mudslide, searchers continued their work in the sodden destruction zone.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner confirmed on Sunday evening that 21 people have died in the mudslide. Of these, only 15 have been officially identified.

Flickr Photo/GovInslee (National Guard) (CC-BY-NC-ND)

With 100 percent chance of rain in the forecast for Friday, Snohomish County Fire District 21 Chief Travis Hots held a brief conference in the morning to update on the progress of the Oso mudslide.

Hots said the rain makes the efforts of the workers in the debris field, now in their seventh day of search operations, slow and complicated. “We’ve got a hard day ahead of us,” Hots said.

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