Jenna Montgomery

Director, Digital Media

Jenna Montgomery is a Seattle native with over 10 years' experience writing and designing for the Web. She also has a love for paper, having pursued two degrees in printmaking. Her prints have been in several shows, including one jurored by the Whitney's David Kiehl, and she has held artist residencies in Seattle and Carson City, Nevada.

While at the University of Iowa, Jenna built and managed websites for the Center for the Book, Health Sciences Library and the graduate student union. She came to KUOW in 2006 from Kagedo Japanese Art where she managed the gallery, studio photography, traveling exhibits and website for four years. In 2007, Jenna became the director of digital media at KUOW, a new position within the organization.

Jenna lives near Lake Washington with a cat, a toddler and a photographer.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/NCinDC

We’ve seen lots of sports scandals in the news over the years that have to do with performance-enhancing drugs, commonly referred to as doping. Dope, from the Dutch word doop, is actually a gravy or a sauce, so how did we go from gravy to drugs? Lexicographer Ben Zimmer gives KUOW's Ross Reynolds the straight dope on dope.

KUOW is creating a new, fast-paced, two-hour news show called The Record on KUOW, airing 12 p.m. - 2 p.m., Monday through Friday, starting September 3, 2013. Find out more: www.kuow.org/faq

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Kenneth Bae, an American man from Lynnwood, Wash., has spent more than nine months imprisoned in North Korea. Bae had been telling his family that his health was failing, possibly from diabetes-related complications. Bae is now suffering from severe back and leg pain and has lost more than 50 pounds, his sister Terri Chung told CNN late Sunday.
News
KUOW Photo/Carlos Nieto

UPDATE: 8/7/13, 1:13 p.m. PT

Peter Steinbrueck, who was trailing Ed Murray and Mike McGinn in the Seattle mayor’s primary this morning, spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on Weekday today and conceded the race.

The Seattle Times/Genevieve Alvarez

Audio Pending...

Sub Pop Records may have started small but the label has always made a big impression. Sup Pop, which began as a fanzine and evolved into a record label in the late 1980s, is considered the epicenter of the grunge movement. Megan Jasper, vice president at Sub Pop, gives Ross Reynolds a tour of the office.

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Getting federal money to repair the country’s aging transportation infrastructure is getting increasingly difficult. The Atlantic Wire pulled together the numbers.
News
AP Photo/Francisco Rodriguez

Dr. Gordon Giesbrecht, a thermophysiologist from the University of Manitoba, has studied over 100 car submersions. He says  you have 30-60 seconds to get out of a sinking car, and you don't want to wait until the car is completely underwater.

Alternate Routes Around I-5 Skagit River Bridge

May 24, 2013
WSDOT

WSDOT is asking drivers to allow ample time for travel through the I-5 Skagit River area. Both directions of I-5 are detoured in Skagit County.

Ray Suarez at his desk
PBS

Journalist Ray Suarez just finished writing a new book called "Latino Americans." The way he sees it, American history as it's currently taught tends to ignore Latinos. He hopes to change that. His book starts in the 17th century and goes up until yesterday, when he sent the book off to his publisher. Suarez gives Ross Reynolds the long view of "Latino America." Below are highlights from the interview, along with excerpts from his 2010 speech, "The Browning of America."

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Former King County Executive Ron Sims announced today on KUOW that he will not run for Seattle mayor as many people have speculated.

groucho / Flickr

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jared Diamond joins Ross Reynolds in front of a live studio audience. For decades he has studied Papua New Guinea cultures. He writes about what we can learn from traditional social organizations in his new book "The World Until Yesterday." Below are highlights from the interview.

El Narco
Courtesy Bloomsbury Press

Since 2006, more than 40,000 soldiers, police officers, traffickers and citizens have died in Mexico’s bloody drug war — from the mountains where pot and poppies are grown to the streets of Mexico City. Journalist Ioan Grillo tracks the rise of the cartels and their increasing influence north of the border in his book, "El Narco." He joins Steve Scher with a report from the front lines of the Mexican drug war.

Andrew Morrell / Flickr

Coming up on Spotlight, December 31 at 8:00 p.m.

In this hour of BackStory, we're all about the boozin'. Along the way, we ask when and why consumption and production has ebbed and flowed. We look at why rum became the drink of choice among revolutionary troops, why American Indians were rejecting alcohol two centuries before the rest of the country, and follow the long march toward Prohibition.

Originally produced a few years ago, this episode has been revised to include new segments and reflect fresh insight into the subject.

Flickr/Better Than Bacon

Dan Savage is a sex columnist, author, advocate and more.  He is behind the It Gets Better project, an archive of hopeful videos aimed at troubled gay youth, and the author of "The Commitment: Love, Sex, Marriage and My Family." Savage talks to Ross Reynolds about marriage and what he plans to do now that same-sex marriage is legal in Washington state.

Jay Inslee
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Governor-elect Jay Inslee announced three members of his transition team yesterday, just as the state revenue council announced their prediction of a $900 million budget shortfall over the next two years. Inslee spoke with KUOW’s Steve Scher about his approach to closing that gap and his role in supporting the initiative that passed recreational use of marijuana.

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