Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle TV writer Melanie McFarland about how RuPaul's Drag Race helped her out of the deep, dark pit of depression. Drag Race is a reality TV show that pits drag queens against each other in fashion and lip-syncing challenges. 

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why he disagrees with a U.S. Chamber of Commerce study that ranks Seattle 11 out of 25 American cities in terms of "readiness to capitalize on the inevitable shift to a digital economy."

Woodie Guthrie, 1943
Public Domain

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Greg Vandy about his new book, "26 Songs in 30 Days: Woody Guthrie's Columbia River Songs and the Planned Promise Land in the Pacific Northwest." 

Rebecca Benson, a public health nurse in King County, holds up a box now being given to parents for their babies to sleep in. Benson, who shared a bed with her own babies, now believes that giving babies their own space to sleep is preferable.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When infants die in King County, the medical examiner investigates.

One hundred babies were found to have died of SUID – sudden unexpected infant death – between 2009 and 2015, according to data obtained by KUOW.


Found photo of an Indiana family.
Flickr Photo/Brent (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8mjHW2

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Stephanie Coontz about her updated and revised book, "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap." Coontz teaches history and family studies at Evergreen State College in Olympia.

Aji Piper (top row, middle) Adonis Piper (second row, right) and attorney Andrea Rodgers (top row, right) at King County Superior Court, outside the courtroom where they won their case.
Courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Aji and Adonis Piper, two of eight youth plaintiffs in the case, Zoe and Stella Foster vs. Washington Department of Ecology, and  their attorney Andrea Rodgers.

The kids took the Department of Ecology to court over inaction on curbing carbon emissions in the state. 

Kahlil Joseph. Streetlight, 2014. Motion picture still.
Courtesy Frye Art Museum

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the Frye Art Museum's current exhibition "Young Blood."

The show features the art of two local brothers, Kahlil Joseph and Noah Davis, who made big names for themselves in film and painting, respectively.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about what happens to plans for a new sports arena in Sodo after the Seattle City Council said no to selling the developer a key public right-of-way.

Washington State University cheer squad advice graphic
Facebook Photo/Washington State University Cheer

The University of Washington cheerleading team took some flak for an image they posted on Facebook showing the dos and don’ts for the right tryout look: athletic physique, false lashes, but not too much makeup.

The graphic was intended to give advice to aspiring cheerleaders, but others called the image offensive, exclusionary and ignorant.

A frequent sight in our newsroom: Business reporter Carolyn Adolph arguing with Siri, the iPhone personal assistant.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire's Monica Nickelsburg about why virtual assistants like Siri typically have female sounding voices.

Chipping paint is a lead poisoning danger to kids.
Flickr Photo/Nancy Waldman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/2Unkx2

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about lead risks in Washington state. Children in the state have low risks of lead poisoning, but health officials say the biggest lead risks are not in the water; they exist in lead paint in old houses and other environments like some construction sites. 

Lisa Hallett holding a photo of her husband John
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Mile one: “Oh my God, the babies didn’t stop crying for the last hour and a half.”

Mile two: “I need to buy diapers, what am I going to make for dinner, there’s baby food stuck in the carpet, what am I going to do?”

Mile three and four: “All of a sudden the business and the high energy of that day to day life with young children, it starts to quiet down.”

Mile five: “It’s just quiet, there’s nothing.”

Mile six: “Oh shit, my husband died.”

Jeannie Yandel talks to Mukilteo's Mayor Jennifer Gregerson about the reaction to a proposal to build a mosque in the city. 

What Song Changed Your Life?

Apr 18, 2016
Bob Boilen, Host of NPR's 'All Songs Considered'
Courtesy of NPR/Maggie Starbard

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Bob Boilen, host and creator of NPR's All Songs Considered, about his new book, "Your Song Changed My Life."

Officials confirmed this brown bat found in King County, Washington, contracted white-nose-syndrome.
Courtesy of Progressive Animal Welfare Society

Jeannie Yandel talks with Earthfix reporter Jes Burns about a deadly fungus called white nose syndrome that's killed millions of bats on the East coast. In March, a single bat with white nose syndrome was discovered in Washington state. Burns talks about what the spread of this syndrome could do to the state's ecosystem and agriculture. 

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