Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dona Ponepinto, president and CEO of United Way of Pierce County about a new study commissioned by United Way that found one in three Northwest households are living just above or below the poverty line. 

Yakima City Council (clockwise from top left): Mayor Avina Gutierrez, Holly Cousens, Carmen Mendez, Dulce Gutierrez, Maureen Adkison, Bill Lover, and Kathy Coffey.
Yakima City Council

Jeannie Yandel speaks with newly appointed Yakima City Mayor Avina Gutierrez about the City Council supporting the Voting Rights Act in Olympia.

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Rep. Graham Hunt of Orting doesn’t want to see a naked lady in the locker room.

“If I'm in the restroom, or I'm in the locker room, and I'm changing, and I turn around and there's a woman standing there completely naked, and she has different parts than I do – how is that OK?” he told KUOW’s Bill Radke.

In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, Sgt. Rick Nelson works on locating information on a hard drive with Det. Caitlin Rebe at the Internet Crimes Against Children unit in Manchester, N.H.
AP Photo/Jim Cole

17,000.

That’s the number of seats in the Key Arena – and the number of people believed to be trading child porn right now in Washington state.

Prosecutors say it’s so tough to keep up with technology – and then build successful cases – that they’re always playing defense.

Shilo Murphy at the People's Harm Reduction Alliance in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Shilo Murphy, executive director of the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, about his plan to start a safe consumption site for drug users in Seattle.  

A motel room on Aurora. There are about 50 to 60 women who work as prostitutes on Aurora. Many are addicts, and many have pimps who control their every move. Those without pimps are often homeless and struggle to pay for a night at a cheap motel.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Solving America’s prostitution problem starts with boys in middle school.

That’s how Peter Qualliotine, who runs a treatment program for johns through the Organization for Prostitution Survivors, sees it.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Jon Talton about why commercial and residential construction, Amazon, and Boeing were the Seattle area's biggest economic drivers of 2015.

Homeless Camp Evictions On The Rise In Seattle

Dec 21, 2015
A Seattle homeless camp's eviction notice, taken in January 2015.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Jeannie Yandel talks to Jason Johnson, deputy director of Seattle's Department of Human Services, about the rise in city 'clean ups' of unauthorized homeless tent encampments on public lands.

Scott Bonjukian

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Scott Bonjukian about his proposal before the Seattle City Council to build a lid over the downtown Interstate 5 corridor to create a new central park for the city.

Joby Shimomura's stained glass work at Alki Beach in West Seattle.
Courtesy of Joby Shimomura

Joby Shimomura says working for Gov. Jay Inslee “is like working for the mob.”

“You never leave the family,” said Shimomura, who recently stepped down as Inslee’s chief of staff after a 20-year career in politics. “They totally suck you back in.”

Josephine Howell of Seattle band Radio Raheem .
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Josephine Howell used to find it too painful to talk to her eldest son.

Charles is in prison on the East Coast, serving to two life sentences for second-degree murder. He was convicted at the age of 17 and has been locked up since 1999.

Howell fronts Seattle band Radio Raheem. They’ve written a new song about her son called, “Dear Charles.”

Howell told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel that the song is a way that she attempts to express depths of her feeling in grappling with Charles’ situation.

Marijuana plants growing at Seattle's first legal pot farm, Sea of Green.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Rick Steves doesn’t think Big Marijuana should control your pot. That’s one reason people in Washington state should be able to grow their own weed, Steves told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

KEXP DJ John Richards began the 'Mom Show' a decade ago after his mother died of cancer.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

When KEXP DJ John Richards lost his mom to lung cancer, he went on the air, played songs that he played at her funeral and talked about what he was going through.

A decade later, Richards still does that on the anniversary of his mom's death. But now listeners get involved too.

Rosa Parks on a Montgomery bus on December 21, 1956, the day Montgomery's public transportation system was legally integrated.
Wikipedia Photo

Bill Radke talks to Carla Saulter, writer of the blog Bus Chick, about how Rosa Parks' legacy has impacted her life. 

T-Mobile employees protest outside the company's headquarters in Bellevue.
Courtesy of Communication Workers of America

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Angela Agganis about her lawsuit against T-Mobile. She says the company forced her to sign a nondisclosure agreement after she reported being sexually harassed by her supervisor.  

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