Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways To Connect

A Lyft for-hire car rolls down a street in San Francisco.
Flickr Photo/urbanists (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with financial journalist Felix Salmon about a bill headed to the Seattle City Council that would allow for-hire drivers to unionize. 

Georgie, age 35, wearing her favorite Christmas earrings.
Courtesy Georgie Bright Kunkel

When World War II came, millions of women joined the fight – not on the front lines but doing the vital work of building weapons to defeat the Axis powers. Georgie Bright Kunkel was one of them.

“It was a life-changing event,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel about the experiences that American women had by the time the war formally ended Sept. 2, 1945.

On Memorial Day, May 30, 1948, a dike at Vanport, Ore., broke and the flood engulfed the nearby Portland Air National Guard Base.
Oregon Air National Guard

Jeannie Yandel talks to Shawn Daley, chief innovation officer and assistant professor of education at Concordia University in Oregon, about the lost town of Vanport, Oregon.

Myriam Marquez at her apartment with her cocker spaniel, Joe Cocker.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with Myriam Marquez, former Skagit County public defender and Alzheimer's Association of Washington board member, about how being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease changed her life. 

Misty Upham arrives for a screening at the Cannes film festival in Cannes, France, on May 17, 2013.
Todd Williamson/Invision/AP, File

Native American actress Misty Upham had an impressive resume, having appeared on screen with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in the film "August: Osage County," and with Benicio del Toro in "Jimmy P." But her personal life was in stark contrast to her Hollywood dream.

In October 2014, Upham was living in Auburn with her parents when she went missing. A recent investigative report on the disappearance by Kristen Millares Young for The Guardian found the Auburn police did very little to help find her.

Masooma, pictured with her children, recounted the events of pre-dawn March 11, 2012 when she says a U.S. soldier rampaged through two villages killing 16 people, mostly children. Staff Sergeant Robert Bales pleaded guilty to the massacre.
AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Adam Ashton, military reporter for the Tacoma News Tribune, about Sgt. Robert Bales and how the military evaluates the mental health of their troops. A new report from the military shows Bales exhibited warning signs of potentially violent behavior before killing 16 Afghan civilians in 2012.

The Undre Arms apartments: great or terrible name?
Flickr Photo/Paul Sableman (CC BY 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Cal McAllister, founder of Wexley School for Girls advertising agency, about what makes a great, or terrible, apartment name. 

Lightning over Lakeview, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Emily Neef (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to state climatologist Nick Bond about thunder patterns in Washington state. 

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

When two black women stormed a Seattle rally for Sen. Bernie Sanders last week, the crowd booed and shouted at them to get off the stage. The women refused to back down.

“Now you've covered yourselves and your white supremacist liberalism,” one yelled back.

An event organizer, left, tries to persuade two women who had taken over the microphone from Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., back right, to relinquish it at a rally Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015.`
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

David Hyde talks with Native American writer and activist Gyasi Ross about how he ended up on the stage at Westlake when two Black Lives Matters activists disrupted a Bernie Sanders rally and what he thinks about their actions.

'The Blog' is indicated by dark orange on the West Coast of the U.S. The Blob is a patch of warm water that was detected by a University of Washington climatologist in 2013.
Courtesy of Nick Bond

Call it “The Blob.”

It’s an unusually warm patch of water off the West Coast that has flummoxed climatologists.

“It’s still rearing its ugly head,” said Nick Bond, Washington state climatologist and regular contributor to KUOW. He first detected The Blob in 2013. 

Chef and mixologist Kathy Casey at the Ballard Farmers Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel meets chef and mixologist Kathy Casey at the Ballard Farmers Market to shop for fresh peaches and honey to make a sparkling summer beverage: a honey lavender peach fizz (recipe below!).

For four Saturdays this August, Pike Street between Broadway and 12th will be closed to car traffic.
Google Maps

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Heidi Hall, business districts advocate for the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development, about an experiment to make three blocks of Pike Street pedestrian only. The experiment will take place during four Saturday nights this August.

Jeannie Yandel talks with New York Times writer Nick Wingfield about e-sports and their rise in Seattle. 

Halibut catch in Alaska.
Flickr Photo/Jay Cross (CC BY 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Lee van der Voo, a Portland-based investigative reporter for Investigate West, about her reporting on how some sustainably-certified pollock and sole fisheries are actually harming small, Native halibut fishing communities in western Alaska. 

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