Jason Pagano


Year started with KUOW: 2012

Jason Pagano is a producer at KUOW, where he works behind the scenes to bring you interviews, news coverage and KUOW’s Week in Review. He’s also worked on KUOW’s Weekday and The Conversation. Before radio, he covered A&E at Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger, polished copy at a Philadelphia ad agency and hung about in a TV studio as much as he could at Seattle’s PBS station. Happy to be from New Jersey but living in Seattle, Jason is a graduate of Rutgers University.

Ways to Connect

The Alhamdan family -- two parents and six children -- arrived recently in Seattle from Syria. They are joining a tiny community of 25 recent Syrian refugees.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The Washington State Republican Party is accusing Governor Jay Inslee of distorting history when it comes to his open-door policy toward Syrian refugees following the Paris terror attacks.

Inslee has said we should continue slowly resettling Syrian refugees into the U.S. and Washington. To bolster his case, Inslee used the example of Vietnamese refugees who were welcomed here in the 1970s by then-governor Dan Evans.

How right is that comparison? And how should we balance American values in a time of fear?

Bill Radke talks these issues over with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison, former Washington Governor Dan Evans and Democratic Congressman Jim McDermott.

The French flag flies over the Space needle on Saturday Nov. 14. It was one of several displays of solidarity with France in Seattle after the terrorist attacks on Nov. 13.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Does the Space Needle flying the French flag in solidarity with victims of the Paris terror attacks represent a racist monopoly on grief? Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Charles Mudede.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip.
Flickr Photo/NIAID (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MtIngO

The sleuthing is under way to figure out what has sickened at least 22 people in an E. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle restaurants.

Health officials said Monday that they’re still unsure which food is responsible, but the number of cases is expected to rise beyond the 19 in Washington and three in Oregon reported so far. Seven people have been hospitalized in Washington, one in Oregon.

Seattle City Council District 3 candidates Kshama Sawant and Pamela Banks.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Pamela Banks, a candidate for Seattle’s District 3 council seat, calls her opponent "Budget Rally."

Seattle City Council position 8 candidates Jon Grant and Tim Burgess.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Standing outside the KUOW station, we asked Seattle City Council candidate Jon Grant what he would do if he lost.

He would pay off his debt, he said. Then he paused.

Did we know that 54 percent of the city voted against his opponent in the primary? (Grant got 31 percent in the primary.)

A traffic camera on Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds weighs the costs and benefits of the Move Seattle levy with Eugene Wasserman, of Keep Seattle Affordable: No on Prop 1, and Shefali Ranganathan with Transportation Choices Coalition. City leaders are asking Seattle voters to approve the nine-year, $930 million property tax for transportation projects they say will make it safer and easier to get around.

Daniel Bagley Elementary School in north Seattle.
Joe Wolf/Flickr Photo (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with Seattle school board member Harium Martin-Morris about a new policy to stop suspending elementary students for nonviolent misbehavior.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.

Law gavel
Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

Ross Reynolds talks with state Representatives Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) and Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) about a proposed initiative that would make state Supreme Court justices recuse themselves from cases involving donors who've given them more than $1,000.

Mount Baker glacier as seen from a helicopter in 2009.
Flickr Photo/judy_and_ed (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton about her story on the alarming melting of Northwest glaciers due to hot weather and low snowpack. Scientists say glaciers across the North Cascades could shrink by as much as 10 percent this year.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

It’s a bruising, even brutal, workplace where an employee caring for a dying parent is seen as “a problem” and people cry at their desks. Or it’s an exhilarating place where even lower-level workers can change the way business gets done in America.

Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop and the Seattle Times’ Jon Talton told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that a New York Times story over the weekend and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ passionate response to it provide an intriguing, complex look inside a company that has remade retail and the city it calls home.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Parks and Recreation superintendent Jesús Aguirre about how the city is cutting back on water use to help head off a water shortage.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

How Seattle reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ appearance at a rally this weekend reveals the city is still unwilling to honestly talk about race, an NAACP leader said Monday.

Gerald Hankerson, president of Seattle-King County NAACP, told KUOW’s Todd Mundt that the incident shows that’s “a difficult conversation to have, even with your allies.”

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks with Todd Donovan, professor at Western Washington University, about why more people won't be voting in Tuesday's primary election.