Deborah Wang | KUOW News and Information

Deborah Wang

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close on public television station KCTS9.

Deborah is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from more than two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. During that time, she covered the the Persian Gulf War from coalition headquarters in Saudi Arabia, and then spent many months in Kuwait, Turkey and Northern Iraq filing stories on the war's aftermath. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways to Connect

A march protesting the Seattle police shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21 moves through downtown Seattle on Feb. 25, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Deborah Wang speaks with Jeff Robinson, about the possibility of changing Washington state law that protects law enforcement officers involved in a deadly shooting. The law currently states that police officers can only be convicted of the shooting if it is proved they acted with "malice" and with a lack of "good faith." Those are the most protective standards in the country. Robinson believes the law unfairly shields police from prosecution. Robinson is deputy legal director and director of the Trone Center for Justice and Equality at the ACLU.  

Wang also spoke with Craig Bulkley, president of the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs,  about why he believes the law should stay the way it is written. Bulkley, who is also a law enforcement officer in Spokane, says there is no evidence that police are hiding behind the word "malice."

A legislative task force is expected to make a recommendation on how the state law should be changed. 

Deborah Wang talks to Erik Vance about his book, "Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal."  

Republican candidates for Washington State Treasurer Duane Davidson and Michael Waite.
KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

Washington's treasurer is like the state’s banker. The office managed more than $408 billion in cash last year. 

And the two candidates for that office have very different ideas about what to do with all that money, and the office itself.

Paul Graves, Republican candidate in the 5th Legislative District, speaks with Jackie Treadwell on her porch in Maple Valley.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not hard to see what Republicans in Western Washington are up against this year. State House candidate Paul Graves runs into it at Jackie Treadwell’s door in Maple Valley.

“Are you a Democrat or a Republican?” asks Treadwell.

Natasha Marin is the creator of the Reparations project.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Natasha Marin is a Seattle artist who noticed a divide on her Facebook feed: Her black friends were angry and frustrated about police shootings of black men, and her white friends were saying they wanted to help but didn’t know what to do.

“There is a discrepancy in the lives of people of color and white-identified people in the United States,” Marin said.

Marin put together the Reparations site and accompanying Facebook event. It was a place where people of color could post needs, and white people could help meet those needs.


'If, for my birthday dinner, I could order anything I wanted, I'd request a Maine lobster or a tarantula spider. ' - David George Gordon
Courtesy of Chugrad McAndrews

Deborah Wang speaks with Seattleite David George Gordon, author of the "Eat-a-Bug Cookbook," about his favorite insects to eat and why. Plus: what he serves to trick-or-treaters at Halloween.

Want to get started with entomophagy? See Gordon's recipe for deep-fried tarantulas. Or head over to Central Co-op in Seattle to pick up some crickets.

Habtamu Abdi, the Seattle Police Department's East African Community Liaison
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Seattle is home to one of the nation's largest East African communities.

An estimated 25,000 East Africans live in King County, according to the 2014 American Community Survey.

It's a community that consists of mostly recent  immigrants and refugees from countries like Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea.

Alaskan Way viaduct, Seattle waterfront, downtown
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Deborah Wang talks with Initiative 123 backer Kate Martin and opponent Patrick Gordon about whether Seattle should build a waterfront view park along Alaskan Way — and potentially scrap its existing waterfront plans in the process.

Alissa Wehrman and Eula Scott Bynoe.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

High-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, as well as shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, prompted Eula Scott Bynoe to organize a public discussion with white people about race.


Washington state's Cruz supporters pose at the Republican National Convention. Reporter David Hyde said some have not transferred their allegiance to Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with David Hyde at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland about the Ted Cruz speech that made waves last night because it failed to endorse nominee Donald Trump.

Hyde tells us how the Washington state delegation reacted to Cruz's call for people to vote their conscience.

Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Deborah Wang talks with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo about the abuse minority groups receive online

Deborah Wang speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the Canadian reaction to Donald Trump's official nomination. Palmer also talks about Vancouver's housing market and the return of humpback whales to British Columbia.

Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, about Donald Trump's GOP nomination, which was made official Tuesday night.

Hutchison says Trump can win Washington state and it's time for Republicans to get behind the official presidential nominee. 

Deborah Wang talks to Kelly Rider with the nonprofit Housing Development Consortium and Brianna McDonald, a Seattle homeowner, about Proposition 1, the property tax levy renewal for affordable housing. 

What's behind all these college protests?

May 12, 2016

Deborah Wang speaks with Chronicle of Higher Education reporter Sarah Brown about the inspiration behind protests against racial inequality on college campuses across the nation. Such protests have been happening on the University of Washington and Seattle University campuses this week.   

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