Deborah Wang

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close on public television station KCTS9.

Deborah is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from more than two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. During that time, she covered the the Persian Gulf War from coalition headquarters in Saudi Arabia, and then spent many months in Kuwait, Turkey and Northern Iraq filing stories on the war's aftermath. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways To Connect

A wildfire burns behind a home on Twisp River Road early Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015 in Twisp, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Three Forest Service firefighters killed in a wildfire threatening Twisp were in a vehicle accident before flames overran them, state and federal officials said.

The fire in the Methow Valley is one of many burning across Washington, "an unprecedented cataclysm in our state,” Gov. Jay Inslee told news media Thursday in Chelan after being briefed by fire officials.

Ross Dam on the Skagit River is one of Seattle City Light's major power generation sites.
Seattle City Light

Seattle’s electric utility says it's taking a big financial hit because of the weather: The lack of rain has affected its ability to produce surplus power to sell in the open market.

Its revenue from selling that surplus is down more than 40 percent, KUOW has learned.

sprinkler lawn water
Flickr Photo/Amanda Graham (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Residents of Seattle, Tacoma and Everett are being asked to cut back on their use of water by 10 percent.

That’s because the summer’s historic high temperatures and lack of precipitation have worsened the region’s water supply outlook. In addition, water supply managers are worried about forecasts for drier than normal conditions this fall.

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, center, and U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, right, get a tour of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network from Paul Bodin, left, and John Vidale, rear.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The alert comes in on your cell phone: “Earthquake! Earthquake! Moderate shaking expected in 31 seconds.”

That could be just enough warning to let you take action that could save your life, say scientists building an earthquake emergency warning system on the West Coast.

The primary election for Seattle City Council is Aug. 4. The general election is Nov. 3.
Flickr Photo/Theresa Thompson (CC BY 2.0)

Take us somewhere special. 

That’s what we asked the 47 candidates running for the new City Council districts in Seattle.

Christy McDanold owns the Secret Garden Bookstore on Northwest Market Street. She bought her home in Ballard 20 years ago. Today, she says, she couldn't afford the house she lives in. "I couldn't afford a condo in Ballard today," she said.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The pressure is on in Seattle’s District 6 – pushing up rents for Fremont’s new tech workers, pushing in townhouses where Ballard’s bungalows once sat, pushing on maritime businesses along the waterfront.

This U.S. Geological survey map shows the hot zones for potential earthquakes in the U.S.
U.S. Geological Survey

KUOW's Deborah Wang produced this story as part of her 2010 series “On Shaky Ground.”

The rocks and mud of the Pacific Northwest tell the story of much larger earthquakes that have hit this region in the past – and that could hit us again in the future.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 4, which includes Northeast Seattle up to Northeast 85th Street, there are five candidates running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

Mayor Ed Murray speaks at an announcement of the city's proposals to build more affordable housing.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray unveiled a package of proposals Monday aimed at dramatically increasing the supply of affordable housing in a city that would be taller and denser.

The goal is to build 20,000 more affordable housing units over the next decade. 

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

There are seven districts and two at-large positions – those council members will be elected by every voting Seattle resident.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 7, which includes Magnolia, Queen Anne and downtown, three candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 6, which includes the Green Lake, Ballard and Phinney Ridge neighborhoods, four candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

District 5, which extends north beyond 85th Street, includes Bitter Lake and Northgate. There, eight candidates are vying to represent the area.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 3, which includes Montlake, Madison Park and parts of Capitol Hill, five candidates are running. We asked them to meet us somewhere meaningful in their district.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 2, which includes the International District south to Rainier Beach, there are three candidates.

We asked them to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

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