David Hyde

Contributing Reporter, Interviewer, And Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a contributing producer and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create radio that really matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Don't count on Charles Adkins, a Sanders delegate from Everett, to get on the Clinton train just yet.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

Washington state delegates are split into two camps in Philadelphia this week at the Democratic National Convention.

Nearly three quarters of our state’s delegates are Bernie Sanders supporters. The rest back Hillary Clinton. 

So you’d expect some tension.


Washington state delegates who supported Ted Cruz pose in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night in Cleveland.

That ended what's been a pretty dramatic national convention. KUOW’s David Hyde told host Emily Fox what it’s been like.


One of the stickers for sale at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The Republican National Convention wrapped up last night with Donald Trump accepting the party's presidential nomination.

KUOW's David Hyde and Matt Martin were in Cleveland all week, covering Washington state's delegation.

Here are some of the voices they heard, produced by Kate Walters and Andy Hurst.


Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 


Washington state's Cruz supporters pose at the Republican National Convention. Reporter David Hyde said some have not transferred their allegiance to Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with David Hyde at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland about the Ted Cruz speech that made waves last night because it failed to endorse nominee Donald Trump.

Hyde tells us how the Washington state delegation reacted to Cruz's call for people to vote their conscience.

Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke at the Republican convention Wednesday night — and got booed.

It wasn't something he said. It was what he didn’t say: He refused to endorse Donald Trump.

And that didn’t sit well with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison.

Lots of members of Washington state's delegation to the GOP convention still back Ted Cruz. They wore these T-shirts Wednesday morning at their hotel in Cleveland.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

In the end, the rebellion was crushed. Donald Trump was nominated as the GOP’s presidential candidate.

All of Washington state’s delegate votes were cast for him Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

“Forty-four votes for Donald J. Trump!” state GOP chair Susan Hutchison said in delivering the delegation on the convention floor.


Washington state Republican delegate Eric Minor says he will not be voting for Donald Trump in November.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Pandemonium. That’s what broke out on the floor of the Republican National Convention on Monday as a group of delegates tried to derail Donald Trump’s nomination.

It all came down to rules. Getting delegates to pass the rules set out for the convention is usually a formality. But in Cleveland, there was a rebellion.

Washington state delegate Braedon Wilkerson says Donald Trump fails the constitutional test.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Call it the five stages of grief for delegates who oppose Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention.

KUOW’s David Hyde is in Cleveland, and he told host Emily Fox that many in Washington state’s delegation are feeling that.

Delegates react as some delegates call for a roll call vote on the adoption of the rules during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

David Hyde speaks to Braedon Wilkerson, a Washington state delegate from Olympia at the Republican National Convention.   

A push by anti-Trump delegates to change the rules of the Republican National Convention failed Monday. Delegates wanted to be free to vote for any candidate in Cleveland. 

Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

The countdown to Donald Trump’s acceptance of the Republican nomination has begun in Cleveland. But some members of Washington state’s delegation to the GOP convention still aren’t at peace with that.

“Well, I’m coming with a heavy heart because Donald Trump is our nominee, and the reason I have a heavy heart is he’s not even a Republican,” said Maria Apodaca, one of the alternate delegates. “He’s hijacking the Republican Party.”

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Donald J. Trump is the presumptive Republican nominee. "We will have so much winning if I get elected, that you will get bored with winning... believe me," he said in a speech.

But an eleventh-hour battle is raging behind the scenes that could deny Trump the Republican nomination.  And some members of Washington State's delegation are playing a big role.  

Local Seattle comedians Anica Cihla, Abraham Tadesse, Christan Leonard and Billy Anderson outside Jai Thai on Capitol Hill.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

The top two presidential candidates are pretty unpopular this year, with some of the highest unfavorable numbers in decades.  

But comedians and impressionists like Kate McKinnon as a maniacal Hillary Clinton or DanaCarvey as a supervillain Donald Trump seem to be enjoying themselves.

"I mean I'm not saying I want Donald Trump to be president,” Carvey said. “But I never want to live in a world where Donald Trump isn't running for president."


The U.S. Men’s National Team poses ahead of a Copa America match against Paraguay on June 11.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

The eyes of the soccer world are on Seattle this week for the COPA America Tournament. On Tuesday, a diverse crowd poured into CenturyLink field to watch the world’s top-ranked men’s national team, Argentina, take on Bolivia.

The U.S. Men's National Team plays in Seattle in a quarterfinal match Thursday night. Millions are expected to watch the game in the U.S.

An aerial view of the proposed addition of the Washington State Convention Center.
Courtesy of Washington State Convention Center

Here in Seattle we like to debate almost everything: a monorail, the downtown tunnel, more light rail.

But some big-ticket decisions are hardly debated at all, like a proposed $1.4 billion plan to build an addition to the Washington State Convention Center.

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