Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Awards:  Finalist, PRINDI Award for Breaking News, 2014  

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways to Connect

Jennifer Weitman, left, and Carrie Anderson, right, outside one of their teenage haunts at Totem Lake Mall: Denny's Pet World, now closed. The mall is being readied for redevelopment.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Malls are facing trouble everywhere. But Totem Lake Mall in Kirkland is in a category of its own.  It’s a zombie: an undead mall with just a few remaining businesses. People have been trying to revitalize it for years.

And finally, there’s action. The mall has been bought by a California developer who is reenvisioning it as a place where people can shop, work, play and live. It's a big change from the mall's former identity as a hangout for young people.


Mayor Ed Murray and Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole address the social consequences of systematic racism at a press conference.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s mayor and police chief held a news conference this afternoon to appeal for calm and for dialogue following the shootings of police officers in Dallas and the shootings of African-American men by police. KUOW’s Carolyn Adolph sends this report.

A major bank is giving away up to $5 million today and tomorrow so that people in King County can buy a home. 

Wells Fargo says it will give up to $7,500 to people who qualify today and Saturday at an event at the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle.

What Seattle techies make, compared to the national average. The rest of us are in here somewhere too.
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Seattle-area computer programmers are the highest-paid in the nation. That's according to new data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, released today.

The Great Recession killed a third of construction jobs in the Seattle metro. Despite our current boom, not all those jobs are back. CLICK ON THIS IMAGE for more graphs.
WA Employment Security Department: Anneliese Vance-Sherman

The last recession is long gone, but jobs still haven’t recovered in two major sectors. Both are tied to that last big bust: construction and financial services. 

The financial services sector isn’t back because lending is a much tighter business than it was during the run-up to the economic collapse in 2008.


Barb Brown and Ozzie Wheeler met at the pride parade last year. They said they considered the possibility of violence at this year's parade. But Wheeler said, 'I'd rather come out and risk being slaughtered for who I am than live in the closet.'
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Thousands of people filled downtown Seattle for the pride parade Sunday.

This year’s celebration came in the wake of a mass murder at an Orlando gay nightclub.


Britain's decision to leave the European Union is shaking investor confidence around the world. Stocks plunged, staged a minor rebound and then trailed downward as the uncertainty caused by the Brexit vote sunk in.


Demand is soaring for Seattle-area homes. Buyers who want to succeed are bidding up prices. This Seattle house recently sold for $100,000 over the asking price.
Seattle MLS

House prices in Washington state are rising faster than in any other state in the country.

Rents are also rising, and it’s all because Seattle companies are hiring. It’s an unusual predicament for people looking for a foothold in this real estate market.

About 40 people gathered outside Seattle Universtiy to support embattled dean Jodi Kelly, who has been placed on administrative leave. This is a hostile takeover type of situation, said Beth Derrig, who held a sign that said, We want the truth.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

About 40 people gathered outside Seattle University on Thursday afternoon in support of Jodi Kelly, dean of Matteo Ricci College.


Bricks that fell from an earthquake cover parked cars in Seattle's Pioneer Square district, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2001 after a magnitude 6.8 earthquake which damaging buildings and roads, and closing Seattle's two airports.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Emergency responders across the Pacific Northwest are holding an exercise to test their skills in a magnitude 9.0 earthquake. It's called Cascadia Rising

And one of the challenges that responders would face after a real earthquake would be getting supplies through downtown Seattle.


Kji Kelly of Historic Seattle, at the Good Shepherd Center in Wallingford. The city of Seattle says the building is unreinforced masonry and is expected to be dangerous in a quake. These brick walls could collapse, hurting people inside and outside.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

After a big earthquake it could take 10 days for help to arrive, so neighborhoods will be on their own.

The City of Seattle says communication hubs would allow neighbors to meet up. Many neighborhoods already have a natural meeting place, but a major earthquake brings complications.

Many cats and dogs live as pets to residents of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Members of Seattle’s City Council want to stop the mayor from clearing out the homeless encampment known as the Jungle.

A committee led by Councilmember Sally Bagshaw is introducing an alternative that would have the city wait until it can offer permanent housing to everyone there.


A homeless encampment in what the city calls the I-5 East Duwamish Greenbelt. It's unofficially known as The Jungle. But officials say they are preparing to move the people who live here.
City of Seattle Photo

State and Seattle officials have a plan for emptying out a two-mile stretch of homeless camps under Interstate 5 around Dearborn. It means the end of the area known as the Jungle.

Officials say the plan is to keep people from returning - without building a fence.


A drawing by a child in Professor Kristina Olson's study. Olson has found that transgender and non-trans girls have an equally deep sense of their gender identity.
Courtesy of Marlo Mack

When Marlo Mack heard the White House's guidance on transgendered students, she almost couldn’t believe it. “I’m kind of in shock, elated shock,” she said.


Dow Constantine
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

There is more evidence that the middle class is shrinking in metropolitan Seattle. A report from the Pew Research Center says the middle class has slipped by 7 percent since 2000 to just over half the region’s households. 

Here’s where our region is different from the overall trend: the households replacing those in the middle class here are mostly richer, not poorer. 

Economy reporter Carolyn Adolph discusses this issue with King County Executive Dow Constantine.

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