Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Awards:  Finalist, PRINDI Award for Breaking News, 2014  

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways to Connect

Celebrating the GIX groundbreaking: Tsinghua University VP Yang Bin, UW VP of Innovation Strategy Vikram Jandhyala, Governor Jay Inslee, Tsinghua President Qiu Yong, UW President Ana Mari Cauce and Consul General Luo Linquan
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

An unusual center for learning is taking shape in Bellevue. It’s a partnership between the University of Washington, Microsoft and Tsinghua University in China to build a school for innovation.

The University of Washington said this is the first time a Chinese research university has established a physical presence in the United States.

A photo from the Seattle Fire Department's Twitter feed shows  the side of a bus ripped open after a collision with a duck amphibious vehicle on the Aurora Bridge in Seattle, September 24, 2015. .
Seattle Fire Department

September 24 marks a year since the Aurora Bridge crash. That’s when a Ride the Ducks tourist vehicle broke an axle, crossed the center line and slammed into a bus of international students from North Seattle Community College. Five people died and dozens were injured.


KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s City Council has passed a measure that will ensure workers' schedules are predictable. It’s the latest in a series of low wage worker protections the council has passed. There’s been the $15 minimum wage, paid sick leave, and restrictions on criminal background checks.

Fatal crashes
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

Traffic deaths are up in Washington state, and by a lot. Last year, 567 people lost their lives in crashes. That’s a hundred more than the previous year.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Everywhere, people are deserting the public space.

They’re not standing in line at the bank: They’re banking online. They’re not shopping for clothes at the mall: They’re getting clothes mailed to them at home. The internet is enabling people to meet their needs without going out.

AirAsia bought 100 Airbus A321neos at the Farnborough Airshow. Airbus has more than 1,200 orders for the new plane.
Airbus YouTube

Boeing has a problem with its airplane product lineup, and its name is the Airbus A321neo. The A321neo is bigger and longer-range than the Boeing 737 MAX 9. As a single-aisle jet, it’s a different plane from Boeing’s next size up, the wide-bodied 787.

Airlines around the world are rushing to order the A321neo, which has posted more than 1,200 orders so far. And that leaves Boeing with a question: Does it need a new plane?

Hanjin Scarlet is at the dock in Prince Rupert BC after several days anchored offshore.
screenshot/ www.marinetraffic.com/

A judge in New Jersey has issued an order that is moving Hanjin cargo around the continent. 

The federal judge temporarily allowed Hanjin Shipping to have its South Korean bankruptcy protections recognized in the U.S.

A Hanjin shipping container ship dwarfs a Washington State Ferry.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Youngstrom (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4HNML6

Hanjin of South Korea filed for bankruptcy protection earlier this week. It's one of the biggest shippers in the world, with ships often seen on Puget Sound and containers piled near our ports.

Now retailers are worried about the holiday goods that are in those containers.

The National Retail Federation is pleading with shippers to keep the movement of goods going. But around the world, port terminals are turning their backs on Hanjin ships.

Nove and Susan Meyers of Olympic Cascade Services Inc., said they were ending their legal challenge to Washington State Ferries' decision to give the food contract to Centerplate Inc. of Connecticut.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The food on Washington State Ferries is set to change.

Today a court injunction expires; that frees Washington State Ferries to sign a new contract with Centerplate of Connecticut.

As Shoreline's planning commission met Thursday night, people in the Ridgecrest neighborhood hold the biggest event on their calendar: their annual ice cream social. Shoreline mayor Chris Roberts, in green, is serving ice cream.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Shoreline’s planning commission has approved the rezoning of a large area around the future 145th Street light rail station near the city’s border with Seattle.

It happened as its citizens learned that more residents would be displaced than previously thought.

Jennifer Weitman, left, and Carrie Anderson, right, outside one of their teenage haunts at Totem Lake Mall: Denny's Pet World, now closed. The mall is being readied for redevelopment.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Malls are facing trouble everywhere. But Totem Lake Mall in Kirkland is in a category of its own.  It’s a zombie: an undead mall with just a few remaining businesses. People have been trying to revitalize it for years.

And finally, there’s action. The mall has been bought by a California developer who is reenvisioning it as a place where people can shop, work, play and live. It's a big change from the mall's former identity as a hangout for young people.


Mayor Ed Murray and Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole address the social consequences of systematic racism at a press conference.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s mayor and police chief held a news conference this afternoon to appeal for calm and for dialogue following the shootings of police officers in Dallas and the shootings of African-American men by police. KUOW’s Carolyn Adolph sends this report.

A major bank is giving away up to $5 million today and tomorrow so that people in King County can buy a home. 

Wells Fargo says it will give up to $7,500 to people who qualify today and Saturday at an event at the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle.

What Seattle techies make, compared to the national average. The rest of us are in here somewhere too.
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Seattle-area computer programmers are the highest-paid in the nation. That's according to new data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, released today.

The Great Recession killed a third of construction jobs in the Seattle metro. Despite our current boom, not all those jobs are back. CLICK ON THIS IMAGE for more graphs.
WA Employment Security Department: Anneliese Vance-Sherman

The last recession is long gone, but jobs still haven’t recovered in two major sectors. Both are tied to that last big bust: construction and financial services. 

The financial services sector isn’t back because lending is a much tighter business than it was during the run-up to the economic collapse in 2008.


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