Bill Radke

Host, KUOW's Morning Newsmagazine

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts KUOW’s Week In Review. He also hosts the morning newsmagazine, as he did 20 years ago! After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was the morning host in the 90s and the creator of past show Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/

If America's gun debate is stuck, what would un-stick it? Is it time to ban youth football? Was Renoir that bad at painting? And who else is overrated?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with writer Sherman Alexie, Washington state Senator Pramila Jayapal and Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center.

Community members gather for a candlelight vigil for those killed in a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015.
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

We'll bring you the latest on investigations into the Roseburg, Oregon, shooting and last week's fatal Aurora Bridge crash. Plus: Shell’s Arctic oil abandonment as seen from the Aleutian Islands. Where did all the I-405 drivers go? And now that the Seattle Mariners have named Jerry Dipoto as their new general manager, will they finally put the right pretty Lego castle pieces in place and leave them there?

Bill Radke figures out the week’s news with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, journalist Erica C. Barnett, former state lawmaker Bill Finkbeiner, KUOW’s John Ryan reporting from Alaska, Seattle Times reporters Lewis Kamb and Geoff Baker, Northwest News Networks’s Chris Lehman and WSDOT tolling director Craig Stone.

Shell's Polar Pioneer was greeted by dozens of protesting kayakers when it arrived in Seattle this spring.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Environmentalist are celebrating Shell’s decision to stop oil exploration off Alaska’s northern coast indefinitely, but the immediate future of the company’s base at the Port of Seattle is unclear.

Daniel Bagley Elementary School in north Seattle.
Joe Wolf/Flickr Photo (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with Seattle school board member Harium Martin-Morris about a new policy to stop suspending elementary students for nonviolent misbehavior.

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Is the Aurora Bridge too narrow for six fast-moving lanes? Tim Eyman is in trouble again, and unrepentantly so. What did China’s president bring to Seattle besides traffic? Will Seattle’s tallest landmark be eclipsed by a long shot? And what if the Seahawks never win again?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Bill Finkbeiner, plus KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph, Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins, Puget Sound Business Journal’s Emily Parkhurst  and Mike Pesca of Slate’s The Gist podcast.

Seattle Aquarium veterinarian Lesanna Lahner checks Mishka's fur after the otter was transferred from Seward, Alaska in February 2015.
KUOW Photo/Sara Lerner

Did the Seattle teachers strike change the conversation about public education? Why is China’s president stopping in Seattle on his way to D.C.? And why does a sea otter at the aquarium need an inhaler?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter, Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center and former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels.

Seattle students Tamar Rosenblum, 7, and Natalya McConnell, 10.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke speaks with Natalya McConnell and Tamar Rosenblum. They returned to school today, along with more than 50,000 Seattle students, after the teachers' union reached a tentative contract agreement with the school district. 

Kids on the picket lines in Seattle.
Courtesy of @QAMassage via Twitter

What will bring striking Seattle teachers back to the bargaining table? What's next for Washington state's charter schools? Should Seattle approve a near billion dollar transportation levy? And if you work at Amazon, Microsoft, Boeing or another big local company, are you getting an illegal perk if your landlord cuts you a deal on rent?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with KIRO 7’s Essex Porter, Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center and ‘The C is For Crank’ blogger Erica C. Barnett.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Mount McKinley is reverting to its native Alaskan name, Denali. So how about renaming Mount Rainier? Plus, Seattle teachers, who might strike next week, are in a union – should Uber drivers be, too? And which words are too offensive for the college classroom?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Eli Sanders, Knute Berger and Erica C. Barnett.

 Grist's Katie Herzog, Crosscut's Knute Berger, KUOW's Bill Radke and Seattle Channel's Joni Balter in the KUOW offices on Friday, Aug. 28, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bellevue High School’s dominant football program is investigated over an alleged “diploma mill.” Gun rights groups sue Seattle over its “gun violence tax.” Has Amazon energized Seattle or ruined it?

Bill Radke reviews the week’s news with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter and Grist’s Katie Herzog.

File photo of softball and mitt
Flickr Photo/Hillarie (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Why should the rest of us care whether Amazon employees love or hate their jobs? How can we make wildfires less destructive? What are we teaching our kids when we tell them to throw a little league game to win a tournament?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with New York Times writer David Streitfeld, Geekwire's Todd Bishop, former GOP leader Bill Finkbeiner, state Senator Michael Baumgartner, former firefighter Kyle Dickman and journalist Erica C. Barnett.

Erica C. Barnett, Joel Connelly, Ijeoma Oluo and Bill Radke breakdown the week's news.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

We’ll play you audio from Saturday’s rally with Bernie Sanders which was disrupted by two Black Lives Matter activists and debate the meaning of the protest and the subsequent reaction. Also, the Washington Supreme Court fines us $100,000 a day for failing to fund education – will that finally force the legislature to act? And should you get a $124 ticket for getting stuck in an intersection and “blocking the box”?

Bill Radke explores those stories and more of this week’s news with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo and journalists Joel Connelly and Erica C. Barnett.

Eli Sanders, Rob McKenna and Mayor Ed Murray participate in KUOW's 'Week in Review' in front of a live audience at the Vera Project on Fri. July 31, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

For the last stop on our summer tour, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray stopped by to say why he relented on a controversial affordable housing proposal. Plus, a new Tim Eyman initiative qualifies for the ballot, Russell Wilson stays a Seahawk and Bill Radke answers the question: "Should I be using less water?"

Featuring Radke,  The Stranger's Eli Sanders, former state attorney general Rob McKenna, Northwest News Network's Phyllis Fletcher, Seattle Times sportswriter Percy Allen and a happy crowd at The Vera Project at Seattle Center.

Bill Radke, Deb Wang, Chris Vance and Luke Burbank  at the Leif Erikson Lodge as part of the 'Week in Review' summer tour.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

KUOW's Week in Review was at Leif Erikson Lodge in Ballard in front of a live audience as part of the show's summer tour. On the docket: what's the solution for affordable housing? Also, should we save a little viaduct to preserve that view? Is there a fairer way to enforce the outdoor pot smoking ban? And a week after the New Yorker earthquake piece, are you still shaking?

Bill Radke convenes a panel of Live Wire radio's Luke Burbank, KUOW's Deborah Wang, former state GOP head Chris Vance and special guests.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata and Roger Valdez of Smart Growth Seattle about whether or not it is time for the city to intervene in rent prices, which have climbed faster here than anywhere in the country.