Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

week in review radke joni zaki rob
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this week when Hillary Clinton became the first woman to receive a presidential nomination from a major party in the United States. We’ll talk about the convention, Hillary’s moment, and party unity. What is party unity, anyway? And why does it matter? 

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about unity at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions and how the elections of the past compare to the 2016 conventions. 

Bill Radke talks with Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield about a new push for state lawmakers to pass an assault weapons ban in Washington.

A graphic created by Shoparttheft.com shows side by side comparisons of artists' work with Zara productions.
Courtesy of Shoparttheft.com

Seattle artist Michael Heck was shocked to find out one of his designs was handpicked for a pair of designer shorts; especially because his design – a drawing of Saturn, melting like a scoop of ice cream  – was used without his permission.

Heck is one of several independent artists who found their original designs popping up on clothing at Zara, a Spain-based retailer with stores around the world, including here in Seattle. 

WA delegate on Hillary Clinton's historic night

Jul 27, 2016
Washington Democratic delegate Jamian Smith.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke talks with Washington state delegate Jamian Smith and KUOW's David Hyde from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a town hall meeting at Hillside Middle School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Jan. 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Cvop2D

Twelve women have run for president – ever.

That’s partly because women didn’t get the right to vote until 1919. But Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the University of Washington, said that’s also because we view the presidency as a hyper masculine office.

A Ku Klux Klan rally in Oregon (estimated 1920s)
Courtesy of the Oregon Historical Society

Bill Radke talks with Alana Semuels about an article she wrote for The Atlantic about Portland, Oregon's history of racism. We all know the PDX has a reputation as a liberal, quirky city. Despite this stereotype, Portland today is the whitest city in America, partially as a result of deliberately racist policies in Oregon and Portland itself, some of which date back to the mid 19th century.

Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

Birkenstocks
Flickr Photo/Simon D (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/f6vQ64

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop about why Birkenstock has decided to stop selling their iconic shoes through Amazon's online marketplace.

Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

Bellingham band ODESZA is the biggest local band you've never heard of, according to DJ Marco Collins.
Flickr Photo/Adinda Uneputty (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/roKKFt

Bill Radke gets a preview of bands to watch out for at this weekend's Capitol Hill Block Party from Seattle DJ Marco Collins. His favorites include ODESZA, Iska Dhaaf, Car Seat Headrest, and JusMoni.

Jonathan Martin, Gyasi Ross, Bill Radke and Lorena Gonzalez made up our Week In Review panel today.
KUOW/Bond Huberman

This week, Ron Smith, the leader of Seattle’s Police Officers’ Guild, resigned. His resignation came after the fallout from a comment he posted to Facebook that read, “The hatred of law enforcement by a minority movement is disgusting … #Weshallovercome.”

However, according to Smith, his resignation has more to do with his approach to police reforms. So what does the city need to do next to keep police reform moving forward under new leadership?

The Blerch is a sort of life-coach spirit animal coaxing comic artist Matthew Inman to lace up and go running.
The Oatmeal/Matthew Inman (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/running)

Our daily lives can sometimes feel like an overwhelming monster. Some days we beat the monster and we feel on top of the world. Other days, we don't.

Local comic artist and creator of The Oatmeal, Matthew Inman, conjured up what his monster looks like: a creature called “The Blerch” that's constantly chasing after him. The Blerch is a key character in his book, “The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances."


Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a singer who changed the lyrics to the Canadian national anthem to say 'All Lives Matter' at the Major League Baseball All-Star game Tuesday. 


Preschoolers huddle beneath a table at Green Tree Early Learning Center in Seattle, which conducts monthly earthquake drills.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton about why so many Washington state schools are unprepared for a major earthquake.


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