Amy Radil

Reporter

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways To Connect

John Syverson, facilities manager for the Frye Hotel downtown, doesn't sugar coat the problems around his buildings.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The Frye Hotel in downtown Seattle evokes a certain nostalgia. Two towering brick buildings are connected by an awning where one imagines a white-gloved doorman standing.

But outside, facilities manager John Syverson doesn’t hide the less charming problems with the building.

Christopher Monfort is escorted into the courtroom on the first day of his trial for murdering SPD Officer Timothy Brenton, along with other charges, on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Christopher Monfort should spend the rest of his life in prison without parole for the ambush slaying of a Seattle police officer, a King County Superior Court jury decided Thursday.

The iconic sculpture in McCaw Hall, home of the Pacific Northwest Ballet and Seattle Opera.
Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Tourists have spent more time and money in King County than expected in recent years. Now officials say those tourist taxes will soon translate to upgrades for county arts facilities.

Until last January, hotel and motel taxes in King County went to pay the debt for the demolished Kingdome, right down to repairs for fallen ceiling tiles. 

The primary election for Seattle City Council is Aug. 4. The general election is Nov. 3.
Flickr Photo/Theresa Thompson (CC BY 2.0)

Take us somewhere special. 

That’s what we asked the 47 candidates running for the new City Council districts in Seattle.

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

There are seven districts and two at-large positions – those council members will be elected by every voting Seattle resident.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 7, which includes Magnolia, Queen Anne and downtown, three candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 6, which includes the Green Lake, Ballard and Phinney Ridge neighborhoods, four candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

District 5, which extends north beyond 85th Street, includes Bitter Lake and Northgate. There, eight candidates are vying to represent the area.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 3, which includes Montlake, Madison Park and parts of Capitol Hill, five candidates are running. We asked them to meet us somewhere meaningful in their district.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 2, which includes the International District south to Rainier Beach, there are three candidates.

We asked them to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 1, which encompasses West Seattle and South Park, nine candidates are running.

We asked them to meet us somewhere in the district that signifies why they’re running.

(Photo courtesy of the University of Washington)

Update: Two days after this story was published, on Tuesday, June 30, Gov. Jay Inslee signed Washington’s state budget. The new budget includes $20 million over the next two years for drug prevention and education.

The campaign to legalize marijuana promised that almost a quarter of the taxes from those sales would fund education and prevention efforts.

And pot is selling well: Washington state’s marijuana retail stores are selling over $1 million worth of marijuana a day.

Terrell Jackson reopened his family's Catfish Corner restaurant in Rainier Beach, closer to old customers.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

If you want to track displacement from Seattle’s Central Area, just follow the restaurants. Jackson’s Catfish Corner in Rainier Beach started on East Cherry Street. That former restaurant, a neighborhood mainstay, was sold last year and is now boarded up.

Officer Timothy Brenton's brother and stepmother embrace at the King County Courthouse following the guilty verdict of Christopher Monfort. Monfort was found guilty of mudering Brenton while he was sitting in his patrol car in 2009.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

A man who shot and killed a Seattle police officer as he sat in a patrol car was found guilty of first-degree murder on Friday.

A King County jury rejected defendant Christopher Monfort’s insanity plea in the 2009 murder of officer Timothy Brenton.

Lee Townsend with the Metroplitan Improvement District checks his "hotspots" in Belltown for litter...and worse.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Over the past year, street sweepers in downtown Seattle saw a dramatic increase in the number of syringes on the ground. But those numbers have declined since March. They’re a data point in the larger debate over policing and drug use downtown.

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