U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Peace (right) and her wife, Debbie, with their youngest daughter at their home in Spanaway, Wash.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Capt. Jennifer Peace walks into the room, a tall, thin woman in crisp uniform, with minimal makeup and trim brown hair.

But when soldiers call her ma’am, she has orders to correct them. They must call her sir.

1962: Remembering The Deadly Columbus Day Storm

6 hours ago
Photo by Seattle Municipal Archives.

A lot of strange things happened in October 1962.

In Hollywood, Bobby "Boris" Pickett topped the charts with “Monster Mash.” In New York, James Brown recorded his incredible "Live at the Apollo" album. And in Cuba, offensive missile sites were being built, marking the start of the Cuban missile crisis.

Closer to home, the Pacific Northwest was about to face one of the most destructive natural disasters in American history.

The White House sent out this pool report by Seattle Times reporter Jim Brunner.
White House local pool report

Our radio friends at KEXP and KNDD got some love from the Obama press corps when the president was in town last week.

Jim Brunner, a government reporter at the Seattle Times, was taking notes for local reporters. At 6:39 p.m., Brunner filed a brief report that was later shared by the White House press office. The motorcade had just left the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle, where Obama was fundraising for Sen. Patty Murray.

Two workers injured in the explosion at a hydroelectric dam in central Washington remain in critical condition Friday afternoon with burns covering more than 20 percent of their bodies.

"Spite Mounds," 1910. The most famous image of the Denny Regrade is often described as depicting "spite mounds." But writer David Williams says, at least in one case, it wasn't spite at all that kept these mounds standing. Just paperwork.
Courtesy of University of Washington Special Collections/Asahel Curtis

There’s an easy explanation for all of mountain-moving ambition of Seattle’s forefathers.

“They were crazy,” geology writer David Williams told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

"Ken Meeks, PWA," by Alon Reininger
Courtesy of Tacoma Art Museum/Contact Photo Images

Tacoma Art Museum has opened a new exhibit called "Art AIDS America." It includes what co-curator Jonathan David Katz calls the first work of AIDS art, an abstract piece from 1981 by Israeli-born artist Izhar Patkin.

The presidential motorcade and Air Force One at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport in Arizona earlier in 2015.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Get ready for what could be another epic evening commute, Seattle. President Barack Obama will be in town Friday for a campaign fundraiser for Sen. Patty Murray.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir's "The Luncheon of the Boating Party," finished in 1881. Renoir was a founder of the impressionist painting movement but moved on to other styles.

Was Pierre-Auguste Renoir a “far more complex and thoughtful painter than generally assumed” who influenced a generation of avant-garde artists, or was he “the most overrated artist east, west, north and south of the river Seine”?

KUOW reporter Ruby de Luna interviews David Whedbee about the challenges of navigating a wheelchair around bad curb cuts in Seattle.
Courtesy of Disability Rights Washington

Crossing Seattle streets can be hazardous for people with disabilities. That’s because curb cuts are either missing, broken or poorly placed.

Disability Rights Washington, an advocacy group for people with disabilities, wants to change that and has filed a class action suit against Seattle.

A file photo of a member of Puget Sound's Swinomish tribe participating in a ceremonial salmon blessing. Northwest tribes hold vigils along the Columbia River to pray for the return of salmon.
KUOW Photo/Katie Campbell

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced Thursday the state is pursuing clean water rules that match federal recommendations for protecting human health.

Inslee said he would direct the Washington Department of Ecology to draft new rules that reduce pollution enough for people to safely eat more fish from Washington waters.

On stage at Ignite Seattle 27
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart (CC BY-SA 2.0)/

The Ignite series started here in Seattle in 2006 and has expanded to over 100 countries. Each Ignite event gives you the chance to talk about something that inspires you. The thing is, you only have 5 minutes to do it on a stage in front of hundreds of strangers at Town Hall Seattle.

Their motto is “enlighten us, but make it quick!”

The Grief I Chose: Placing My Baby For Adoption

Oct 8, 2015
Baby Benjamin before he was placed in his adoptive mother's arms.
Courtesy of Beth Roberts

Ten years ago, Nathan and I placed our firstborn son for adoption. 

I was barely 23 when I got pregnant with Benjamin. I had just graduated from Northwest University, a Christian college on the Eastside, and was preparing to spend two years in Jakarta, Indonesia, as an associate missionary. I got my acceptance letter to the program the same week I took a pregnancy test. 

This Adoptee Went Back To China But Couldn't Connect

Oct 7, 2015
Lydia Nasser in China: “This was just me standing alone, Lydia and China.”
Courtesy of Lydia Nasser

Lydia Nasser celebrated her 19th birthday on July 17, but she doesn’t actually know when she was born.

“I could’ve been born anywhere between the 15th and like the 20th," Nasser explained. “Sometimes it’s funny thinking about that. It never affects me in a bad way, it’s just a question mark in my life.”

Nasser doesn’t know her birth date because when she was 2, her parents adopted her from China and brought her back to Washington state, where she has lived ever since.

Seattle Public Utilities says its dams are about three-quarters full.
Flickr photo/Konstantin Stepanov (CC BY 2.0)

Way to go, Seattle and Tacoma and Everett. You’ve cut your water use by 14 percent over the past eight weeks. That handily beat the goal of the region’s city water managers of a 10 percent reduction.

The bad news, the cities said Wednesday, is that typical fall rains still haven't arrived (despite the drizzle outside) to end the drought gripping Washington state.

Flickr photo/sea turtle (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Audio Pending...

Seattle may be one of the country’s most progressive cities, but it falls short on services for elderly LGBTQ people, according to University of Washington researchers.

So they advise creating a new program to train health and human service providers in caring for older adults who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.