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KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

On Wednesday Seattle media devoted their coverage to people experiencing  homelessness. That same day billionaire Paul Allen announced he would invest $1 million to build 13 units in Columbia City for people who are homeless. Is this a workable solution?   

Earlier this year two Seattle police officers shot and killed a man named Che Taylor. This week the Seattle Police Department’s Force Review Board ruled that the shooting was “reasonable.” Are these shootings happening because the police have a problem with implicit bias?      

Dr. Michael Katze of the University of Washington microbiology department.
University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with Buzzfeed News reporter Azeen Ghorayshi about the sexual harassment allegations against University of Washington microbiology professor Dr. Michael Katze.


republican GOP kuow event
KUOW/Lisa Wang

Oh, boy. Some Washington state Republicans are not digging the Donald. 

Like Chris Vance, a Republican running for U.S. Senate. 

“At some point, you have to say, 'My party may not always be right,'" Vance said. "And I have to follow my conscience and my principles. There is no honor out there right now in this idea of, ‘No matter who we nominate we have to fall in line.’ I can’t do it and I won’t do it.”


Female House members on the steps of the House on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.  Jan. 3, 2013, prior to the official opening of the 113th Congress.
AP Photo/Cliff Owen

It’s been 100 years since the first woman was elected to Congress. Since then, the rise of women into positions of political and corporate power has been slow-going to say the least.

Jay Newton-Small is TIME Magazine’s Washington D.C. correspondent and the author of “Broad Influence: How Women Are Changing the Way America Works.” She had to dig, and hire a team of researchers, but the data she discovered reveals how a critical mass of women in public and private leadership positions clearly benefits both realms.

Tori Zivkovic / KUOW

People sometimes take unlikely paths to get where they're going. This is the story of an unlikely scholar.


Alex Williams, an operator for 211, King County's information line for emergency food or shelter.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with Mark Ellerbrook about King County's new approach to connecting homeless people with shelters and housing. Ellerbrook is regional housing and community development manager for King County.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Homemakers and entrepreneurs, farmers and retirees: What unites them? These are some of the most frequently-held occupations among Republican donors in Washington state.

On Thursday, June 30, KUOW is hosting an event in Bellevue where we hope to bring Washington state Republicans together to discuss the present and future of their party.

Nika Nellum (right) graduated Wednesday from the rigorous King County Juvenile Drug Court program. The program has drawn national attention. But Nellum gave her mother most of the credit.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s graduation week at the King County Juvenile Drug Court. Four teenagers made it through a tough program that’s drawn attention from around the nation. Instead of incarceration, they got help.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

It’s been nearly eight months since Seattle Mayor Ed Murray declared a state of emergency around homelessness. But the situation seems to be as bad as ever, or worse.

Murray said the state of emergency has given the city access to more resources, local and federal. But he acknowledges the city still has a long way to go to solve the homelessness crisis.


Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

On Tuesday, Pacific Lutheran University made its plans for KPLU official. The university agreed to sell KPLU radio to a newly formed community group. That cancels KUOW's agreement to purchase the station.

The group Friends of 88.5 FM has already raised the $7 million needed to buy the station (and $1 million in underwriting for PLU). 

Troy Morgan and his sister Robin Morgan moved from Las Vegas. After experiencing high Seattle costs, they moved into a tent encampment because they didn't want to split up.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Troy Morgan lived in Las Vegas for about a decade. It was nothing fancy, he and his sister lived in a hotel.

Morgan suffered from chronic pain, the result of a workplace injury and subsequent spinal fusion. So when he heard the University of Washington had a good medical program, he and his sister packed up all their belongings and headed for Seattle. 

Blues singer Courtney Weaver performs in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kenneth Fiaui had always been jealous of his girlfriend. He was even jealous of her 4-month-old cat.

On the night he shot her, Courtney Weaver was preparing to go out with some friends for the evening. Fiaui didn’t want her to go.

Local Seattle comedians Anica Cihla, Abraham Tadesse, Christan Leonard and Billy Anderson outside Jai Thai on Capitol Hill.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

The top two presidential candidates are pretty unpopular this year, with some of the highest unfavorable numbers in decades.  

But comedians and impressionists like Kate McKinnon as a maniacal Hillary Clinton or DanaCarvey as a supervillain Donald Trump seem to be enjoying themselves.

"I mean I'm not saying I want Donald Trump to be president,” Carvey said. “But I never want to live in a world where Donald Trump isn't running for president."


Pfc. Holly Horned of the Indiana Army National Guard adjusts her gas mask before entering a gas chamber during a nuclear, biological and chemical warfare training exercise at Camp Atterbury, Ind., June 15, 2010.
Flickr Photo/DVIDSHUB (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8cwDmR

Author Mary Roach has a specialty of sorts; she writes about the funnier aspects of science. Along with the humor, she’s known for her thorough research.

Her books include “Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers,” “Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex” and now “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.”  

Mary Roach spoke with Seattle Review of Book’s co-founder Paul Constant at Town Hall Seattle on June 15. The event was sponsored by University Book Store. Ana Sofia Knauf recorded their conversation.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee wants to recognize the LGBTQ community for more than just one month out of the year. 

So he's issued a directive to promote LGBTQ inclusion practices and policies into state government. 


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