Daniel Lyon is seen this summer, his first season as a firefighter.
Courtesy Lyon Family

His 'Best Ice Cube' Ever: Burned Firefighter Battles On

Daniel Lyon, the firefighter severely injured during the deadly Twisp River Fire, is slowly making progress but not out of danger, his doctors said Tuesday.
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Crabs, shrimp and fish lie dead in shallow water near Potlatch State Park along Hood Canal on Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015.
Skokomish Tribe Department of Natural Resources/Seth Book

Fish And Crabs Struggle For Oxygen In Hood Canal’s Depleted Waters

Flickr Photo/Amancay Maahs (CC BY-NC-ND)

More Power To Drivers-For-Hire, O'Brien Says

Election season is here.

What question do you have about local politics in the Puget Sound region?

Georgie, age 35, wearing her favorite Christmas earrings.
Courtesy Georgie Bright Kunkel

When World War II came, millions of women joined the fight – not on the front lines but doing the vital work of building weapons to defeat the Axis powers. Georgie Bright Kunkel was one of them.

“It was a life-changing event,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel about the experiences that American women had by the time the war formally ended Sept. 2, 1945.

This is the second story in our two-part series on how drought and climate change are changing the way the Northwest looks to reservoirs to meet its water needs. Read part one here.

This summer’s hot, dry weather has left Northwest apple growers hurting for water to irrigate their orchards. It’s a hint at what’s predicted as the climate continues to warm.

Kent Stokes says hundreds of miles of fenceline will have to be rebuilt after last year's Carlton Complex and this year's Okanogan Complex wildfires. Cattle ranchers depend on good fences and good neighbors to manage thier lands well.
N3 Photo/Ian C. Bates

In the poem “Mending Wall,” Robert Frost lays down the well-worn quote, “Good fences make good neighbors.” In this year’s dramatic Northwest wildfires, ranchers and neighbors are cutting down “good fences” of all kinds.

Neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks at the 2009 Brooklyn Book Festival. Sacks died this weekend. He was 82.
Luigi Novi / Wikimedia Commons

Oliver Sacks didn’t just look at the brain. He looked at the whole person, he told KUOW in a 1987 interview. 

"One should never just look at diseases or disorders, but how it is for the whole person,” he said. “The person is always struggling to survive and to manage some way or another.”

North America's highest mountain has a new name. Or rather, an old one. President Obama has announced that Alaska's Mount McKinley will now be called Denali, which is what natives call the peak.

It’s a dilemma many American families confront: when to ask mom or pop if they’re ready to move into an old folks’ home. For newer Americans, the very idea often clashes with cultural expectations.

The Washington State Department of Ecology has just released its draft environmental review of two proposed oil terminals on the Washington coast. A third proposed terminal has not yet begun the environmental review process.

The terminals could be built in Grays Harbor, near Aberdeen, doubling current vessel and train traffic levels there.

The state's review found that traffic delays at railroad crossings in the nearby communities of Hoquiam and Aberdeen would increase significantly.

The phrase "police militarization" conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. But familiar as that image is, we don't know how common it is. There are simply no good statistics on police tactical operations in America. The federal government doesn't keep track, and neither do the states — with one exception: Utah.

Participation in sports by girls and young women has soared in recent decades — by 560 percent among high school students since 1972, and 990 percent among college students, according to the Women's Sports Foundation. Highly committed young female athletes now run track and play soccer, basketball, water polo and other demanding sports that require strong bodies.

It seems to be part of human nature to want to belong to a group. People constantly form groups, in all kinds of situations, and high-stakes negotiations on climate change are no exception.

Ever heard of the Umbrella Group? Or the Like-Minded Developing Countries? How about the Group of 77? (Here's a hint — it doesn't actually have 77 countries.)

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