A Dallas police officer shows a robbery victim a photo of a suspect in 2009. The Dallas police department in Dallas has been a leader in blind lineups, which experts say reduces mistakes made by eye witnesses.
AP Photo/LM Otero

Why Eye Witnesses Often ID The Wrong Person

You see someone get assaulted. The cops ask you come down to the police station to check out a photo lineup. You pick the wrong person. It wasn’t malicious on your part – it was normal. Witnesses often identify the wrong suspect, according to Lara Zarowsky, policy director for The Innocence Project Northwest.
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When you buy gas for your car, you're paying a flat, per-gallon tax. But Oregon is starting a new program July 1 that would change things.

Organizers of the U.S. Open men's golf championship are exuding confidence that Chambers Bay Golf Course overlooking Puget Sound will be ready for the tee off in less than three weeks.

Preparations for a state government shutdown are underway because Washington lawmakers haven’t agreed on a budget for the next two years.

Melinda Jankord-Steedman and Phyllis Jantz at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center for the 'Week in Review' summer tour stop on Friday, May 29.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing – that issue is atop the minds of a lot of people in West Seattle and beyond.

KUOW's Week in Review broadcast live Friday from Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle's Delridge area to kick off the show's summer tour through all of the newly formed Seattle City Council districts (find yours on our district map). 

The revamped entrance to The Parker Apartments on Queen Anne Hill.
Bellwether Housing

Money is a big problem for nonprofits trying to build affordable housing. It’s expensive to redevelop old buildings or build new ones.

There are tax credits and grants, and in Seattle there’s money from the city housing levy.

But one group is tapping a new source: private investors, who get a return on the money they put into affordable housing.

The Bureau of Land Management released new plans Thursday for managing sage grouse habitat across public lands in Oregon, Idaho and eight other Western states.

Sage grouse populations have been hit hard east of the Cascades: from habitat loss, invasive species, grazing, and wildfires. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service has called these threats “a death of one-thousand cuts.”

The agency will decide by this September whether to list the sage grouse under the Endangered Species Act.

As promised, Washington Governor Jay Inslee has called an immediate second special session of the legislature. It begins Friday.

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia. And so on.

It was one of the many surprises of an evening spent watching the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night near Washington.

Another big surprise was how much I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I had expected to see a bunch of highly trained kids who've spent months and years memorizing the dictionary, essentially regurgitating that information.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bellevue College wants to partner with Washington State University to expand its slate of four year degrees. It’s a small step in a much bigger transformation.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols has more.

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