Weekday

No longer on air.

Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

Twitter: @KUOWsteve | Facebook: KUOWsteve

To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

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Your Take On The News
10:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Decisions From The Supreme Court, Wendy Davis, And Avoiding A Government Shutdown

Weekday's “News in Review” roundtable comes together to talk over the week’s news.

It was a big week at the Supreme Court. The justices struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and decided the federal Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional. A filibuster by Wendy Davis rocked the Texas legislature, stopping a vote on an abortion bill. The bill will be revisited in the second special session Gov. Rick Perry called.

Washington's own legislature's second session budget problems still divide the floor; but issues will need to be resolved soon to avoid a government shut down on July 1.

What stories caught your attention? What hasn’t been covered enough? What story made your blood boil? Share your thoughts with the panel right now by emailing Weekday.

Science News And Pet Problems
9:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

A Budget Deal, Immigration, Understanding Cancer, And Pet Questions Answered

Mischief comes with pet ownership, but Steve Duno is here to help!
Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Budget Deal In Olympia
Everett Herald columnist and Weekday’s regular Olympia guru Jerry Cornfield brings us analysis of the tentative budget deal reached by state lawmakers.
 
Immigration Deal In DC
Yesterday's immigration reform vote is being hailed as a rare example of bipartisanship. The Senate voted 68 to 32 yesterday to overhaul the nation’s immigration system. It now heads to the House. We talk with Jill Jackson of CBS News from Washington, DC.

Rethinking How We Study Cancer
A scientist at Johns Hopkins University developed a mathematical model to better understand why some cancer tumors are resistant to cancer fighting drugs. Science reporter Carl Zimmer explains the study and how scientists are changing the way they think about cancer.

Pet Questions Answered
Got a difficult dog or cat? Pet trainer, Steve Duno, tackles your questions at 206.543.5869 (KUOW).  Also, is neutering dogs always a good idea?  

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Radio Retrospective
10:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

The State Legislature, The Legacy Of Nelson Mandela And Kid Protections In Radio Broadcast

Flickr Photo/Australian Broadcasting Company

What’s The Deal With The Budget?
Jordan Schrader of the Tacoma News Tribune reports on the latest happenings in Olympia.

The Legacy Of Nelson Mandela
Robert Taylor, former dean of Seattle's St. Mark's Cathedral, was born and raised in South Africa. He bore witness to the breakdown of apartheid. He reflects on the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

Radio Retrospective: Protecting Kids
Parents worried about what children heard on the radio, just like they worry about television, movies and video games today. During radio’s heyday, it was estimated that there were 1,500 murders a week on the air. As a result, strict guidelines were put in place for kids' shows. Did they work?

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman recommends a lunch spot and a cookbook.

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Divorced Band
9:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

US Relations With Africa, Two Queensryches, And Seattle Transgender Pride

Chaos is right! Seattle band Queensryche has split into two entities, making the future of the Queensryche banner uncertain.
From Queensryche's Facebook page.

President Obama Visits Africa
President Obama is making his third and longest trip to Africa, his first visit since winning reelection. The president intends to “reinforce the US' commitment to expanding economic growth” in Africa. We talk with Witney Schneidman, nonresident fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative.

Art Of Our City: Dueling Queensrÿches
Fans of the Seattle band Queensrÿche have a lot be psyched about this week: a brand new album and two live shows. Queensrÿche performed last night at The Crocodile, and they’ll perform again this Saturday night at The Moore. Problem is, it’s actually two different bands, both using the name Queensrÿche. Following a huge fight last summer, the band split in two. What’s going on here? Decibel Magazine editor-in-chief Albert Mudrian helps us sort it out.

Seattle Transgender Pride
The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act this week, paving the way for same-sex married couples to receive the same federal rights and protections afforded to heterosexuals. The ruling is celebrated within the LGBT community as a huge step towards equality. But for transgender people – the T in LGBT – discrimination and inequality is still a very real and pressing threat across the country.

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Canada, Culture, Commerce
10:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Floods In Canada, New Documentaries And CEO Pay

Poster for the movie "20 Feet from Stardom."

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Vaughn Palmer, Robert Horton, Jon Talton
A huge, destructive flood hit Alberta causing an estimated $5 billion in damage. Canadian correspondent Vaughn Palmer gives us the lay of the land. Film critic Robert Horton joins us to preview two documentaries about music: "20 Feet from Stardom" and "Secret Disco Revolution." Then in business news, Jon Talton examines excessive CEO pay.  

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Working Out
9:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

How To Exercise, And Unhappy Workers

Flickr Photo/George C Slade

How To Exercise
Weight training, cardio, intensive intervals, 20 minutes a day, or three times a week: There is a plethora of advice on what the best or most effective workout regimen is, but how do you parse through the different studies and recommendations to find the most beneficial exercise for you? Priscilla Bell is a certified fitness professional with over 20 years of experience. She demystifies exercise and explains the best practices for a healthy workout.

Are Thousands Of Bad Bosses Making American Workers Unhappy?   
Last week Gallup released a poll suggesting that seven out of 10 workers are “checked out” or “actively disengaged” at work. Columnist Timothy Egan says our bosses are to blame.  

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Greendays
10:00 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Greendays Gardening Panel

Flickr Photo/Judy van der Velden

Study Finds Improvement Among Nation's Charter Schools
A new study out of Stanford University shows charter schools across the country are both attracting more students and, in some cases, doing a better job of educating them than public schools. We talk with study leader Dr. Margaret Raymond of Stanford’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes. 

Seattle Times Tries To Help Solve a Mystery
If you read the Seattle Times, on Sunday you might have noticed a front-page story about a mystery woman who died in 2010. It turns out not even her husband knew her true identity. Investigators are still trying to figure out who she was, and the Seattle Times is asking its readers to help. We talk with reporter Maureen O’Hagan.

Greendays Gardening
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert and vegetable gardening expert. They answer your gardening questions every Tuesday.

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Music and Food
9:00 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Voting Rights, New Music Recommendation, And What Is In Your Food?

Flickr Photo/Dan4th Nicholas

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Voting Rights Act
The U.S. Supreme Court issued another of its long-awaited decisions, this one on the landmark 1964 Voting Rights Act. The Court ruled 5-4 to strike down a provision of the law that involves federal oversight for states with a history of racial discrimination in voter registration. How might the ruling affect current charges of voter suppression? We talk with attorney and voting rights advocate Brenda Wright.

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists.  Branch out! Paul De Barros, critic for the Seattle Times, recommends jazz violinist Zach Brock.

What’s In Your Food?
Take a look at a food label. Under the list of ingredients there are sure to be items you recognize, but what about polyglycerol? Aspartame? Or phosphoric acid? The Food Additives Amendment of 1958 was enacted to make sure chemical ingredients were safe for consumption, but how does the FDA monitor all of the chemicals and ingredients food producers use? Professor Marion Nestle, from the department of nutrition food studies and public health, explains what goes into the food we consume and how to be a more informed consumer.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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Your Theme Song
10:00 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Listener Call-In: What Is Your Theme Song?

What music track accompanies you into a room - whether costumed or not?
Flickr Photo/Cliff Nordman

  What Is Your "Walking Into A Room" Theme?
When you think of Darth Vader, you undoubtedly hear "The Imperial March" playing as he swoops in, black robes flowing behind him. His theme song is as distinct to him as his dark clothing and red light saber. It sets the mood of the room before he even enters it, and it tells you a lot about him and his personality, without having to say a word. So if a theme song played every time you walked into a room, what song would you choose? Tell us what your song is and why by leaving a message on our feedback line at 206.685.2526 or by  emailing Weekday.

A History Of Food
9:00 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Appropriating Technology, This Week In Olympia And The History Of Food

William Sitwell's book"A History of Food in 100 Recipes."

 This Week In Olympia
Lawmakers have until July 1 to reach a budget agreement or the government will shut down. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a look at what’s happening in Olympia this week in special legislative session number two.

The History Of Food
We eat every single day, but  we rarely pause to consider why we eat the food we do. How did food evolve throughout history? Where did pasta come from for instance? Who baked the first cupcake? When did humans start recording recipes in cookbooks? William Sitwell has written "A History of Food in 100 Recipes."

Computer Science And Social Justice
Computer science technologies play a powerful role in service of the military and industry, but don’t seem to be widely used by visionaries in the fields of social justice and sustainability. Ideas like complexity theory and nanotechnology seem to have a distant connection to making an impact on social change. Mathematician Dr. Ron Eglash believes in the power of computing for social justice and sustainability. He explored the state of technology today and how it can impact future social change in his work as co-editor of recent book “Appropriating Technology.”

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Your Take On The News
10:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Change Of Heart For The Police Guild, Boeing In Paris And More News Of The Week

  It’s Friday—time to talk over the week’s news. The president of the Seattle Police Officers’ Guild Rich O’Neill has said he’ll accept the DOJ reforms and urges the members of the police union to do the same. The state is preparing for a shutdown if a deal is not made on the budget. Airbus expresses its interest in Washington state, as Boeing’s 787 faces more trouble in the air. Our regular panel is in to discuss the news of the week. What news piqued your interest this week? Share your thoughts by email.

Space News And Radio Satire
9:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Farm Bill, Science News, And Stan Freberg

Flickr Photo/Eric Horst

Farm Bill Is Defeated
It used to be relatively easy to pass the Farm Bill.  Not this time.  The Bill was defeated in the House  What happened?  What does that mean for farmers and people on food stamps?  Todd Zwillich the Washington correspondent for The Takeaway explains what’s next for the Farm Bill.

The News From Space
NBC News Digital science editor Alan Boyle discusses the latest news in physical and space science.

A Conversation With Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg is a well-loved humorist and satirist of radio and television.  He and his wife Hunter Freberg appear live in the KUOW studios to reflect on his career.  

Video highlights from our interview with the Frebergs

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Federal Politics
10:00 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Supreme Court Decisions, Jonathan Alter And Radio Retrospective

Jonathan Alter's book "The Center Holds."

 SCOTUS, DOMA And Proposition 8
The Supreme Court is due to make a decision soon on two major cases effecting marriage equality. Law professor at the University of Washington,Peter Nicolas explains what we can expect from SCOTUS in the coming days. 

The Center Holds
Jonathan Alter has spent more than two decades covering national politics in Washington, D.C. In his new book “The Center Holds,” he examines the challenges President Obama faced in his 2012 reelection campaign, from a Republican Party determined to retake control of Congress and millions in unregulated campaign spending, to Obama’s own distaste for politics.

Radio Retrospective: Radio Expert Frank Buxton
Frank Buxton is an expert on the Golden Age of Radio and a voice talent to be reckoned with. 

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. This time she recommends Shanik.  Prefer to cook for yourself? She reviews "Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables."

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Seattle Opera
9:00 am
Thu June 20, 2013

SPD Reforms, Art Of Our City, Jobs And The Opera Director

Aidan Lang, new director of the Seattle Opera.
Seattle Opera's Facebook page.

 Seattle Police Union President Backs DOJ Reforms
The president of the Seattle Police Officers' Guild Rich O'Neill is now urging members to accept the reforms the Department of Justice has mandated. Seattle Times reporter Steve Miletich explains O'Neill's position.  

Art Of Our City
When Seattle Theater Group took over the Neptune Theatre, the idea was the use the historic venue for concerts and other live performances. Now STG has launched a program to provide the Neptune free of charge for community group shows. Vicky Lee from STG and Bill Anderson, producer of "Out And In," explains the launch of "Nights At The Neptune."

We Hate Our Jobs!
A new Gallup poll suggests that seven out of 10 workers are “checked out” or “actively disengaged” at work. Sandeep Krishnamurthy, Dean of the University of Washington Bothell School of Business explains how the workplace has changed and why that would lead to dissatisfaction.

Who Replaces Speight Jenkins?
Seattle Opera General Director Speight Jenkins has been at his job for three decades, but next year one of the region’s best known arts leaders will step down.  After more than a year, and an international search, Jenkins’ successor has been named:  Aidan Lang, current Director of New Zealand Opera. He talks about what he’ll bring to one of Seattle’s oldest art institutions.

Canada, Culture, Commerce
10:00 am
Wed June 19, 2013

Another Canadian Mayor In Trouble, Apocalyptic Films And Business News

Michael Appelbaum stepped down as the mayor of Montreal on Tuesday, a day after being arrested on 14 counts of fraud.
Flickr Photo/Montreal metropole culturelle

  Canada, Culture And Commerce
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, including the arrest of the mayor of Montreal. Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton reviews "Bling Ring" and "World War Z," opening this weekend. Are these movies signs of the impending fall of the empire? Then, Michele Matassa-Flores of the Puget Sound Business Journal brings us the region’s latest economic news.  

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