Weekday

No longer on air.

Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

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To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

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Mountaineering
9:00 am
Mon March 18, 2013

National Geographic's Explorer Of The Year: Mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner

At sunset behind Capitol Peak as seen from the summit of K2.
Flickr Photo/Jack Brauer

Mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner is the first woman to summit all 14 of the world’s 8,000-plus meter peaks without supplemental oxygen. This accomplishment came with a price. Her 2010 attempt to summit K2 — her last peak — ended when her good friend and partner slipped and fell to his death. A year later, she tried again and was rewarded with a view like she’d never imagined. She said, “I had the feeling that I was one with the universe." We’ll talk with National Geographic's 2012 explorer of the year.

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News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Your Take On The News

It's Friday — time to review the week's top news stories with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. A federal judge approved a first-year plan to reform the Seattle Police Department. Meanwhile, the plan was challenged in court by the Seattle Police Officer's Guild and the Seattle Police Management Association, over concerns about collective bargaining rights.

Also, a bill that would expand background checks for gun owners died in the state House. And the state's budget shortfall grew by $300 million. What stories were you following this week? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Government Stimulus
9:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Was The TARP Bailout A Failure?

Did the TARP bailout fund help you during the 2008 financial crash?
Flickr Photo/Taber Andrew Bain

Why didn’t the TARP bailout fund help the small businesses and homeowners who were slammed by the 2008 financial crash? Neil Barofsky left his job at the US Attorney’s Office in New York to become special inspector general in charge of overseeing the bailout money. He says, from his first days on the job he was met with hostility from the treasury officials overseeing the TARP fund. He charges that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner funneled money to Wall Street firms in ways that bordered on corruption. Neil Barofsky joins us with the inside story.

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Real Estate Development
10:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Rising Popularity Of Microhousing

Microhousing construction in Capitol Hill.
Credit Flickr Photo/Jseattle/Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

As the cost of living continues to rise in the city, people are finding it harder to find an affordable place to live. To accommodate the demand, developers are building microhousing -- tiny studio apartments with private bathrooms that share a kitchen with other units. The microhouses boast affordable living in high-demand neighborhoods such as Capitol Hill and the University District. However, residents in some neighborhoods fear the developments skirt zoning laws and create too much density too fast. City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen is considering legislation that could put new restrictions on microhousing. He joins us to explain.

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Religion
9:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

The New Pope: Jorge Bergoglio Of Argentina

A sign in Italian reading "Hail to the Pope" is held up after the election of Pope Francis I, the 266th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope.
Credit AP Photo/Angelo Carconi

As white smoke billowed from the Sistine Chapel yesterday, millions of Catholics around the world received  the 266th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church: Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina, who will be known as Pope Francis. He's the first pope from Latin America and the first from the Jesuit order. We'll get an account from reporter Tiffany Parks who was in St. Peters Square when he was elected. Also, we'll talk with Father Stephen Sundborg, president of Seattle University.

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News & Culture
10:00 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Coal Ports And Movie Direction

Coal transport by train.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ryan Sitzman

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. And it turns out Canada doesn’t want a coal port either. Then, film critic Robert Horton asks the question: What does it mean when something is “directed” in a movie? Also, Seattle Times economy columnist Jon Talton explores how the sequester cuts will affect our local economy.   

Police Reform
9:00 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Monitor Merrick Bobb's Plan For Seattle Police Reform

Seattle Police patrol cars.
Credit Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay

Tuesday, a federal judge approved a plan to reform Seattle's Police Department. This comes a day after the Seattle Police Officers Guild and Seattle Police Management Association filed a court challenge to the plan, raising concerns about the collective bargaining rights of police officers. We'll talk with independent monitor Merrick Bobb and senior police expert Joe Brann about the details of the reform plan.

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Historical Curiosities
10:00 am
Tue March 12, 2013

The Curious Fates Of Famous Corpses

King Tutankhamun's mostly intact tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter and George Herbert. Global exhibitions of his tomb make the pharaoh a popular and well-known historical figure.
Credit Flickr Photo/Tutincommon

American culture loves celebrity. Magazines and television shows follow the lives of celebrities like an ongoing mini-series -- until they die. That’s when we typically set down one tale and start another. But the story doesn’t always end there. Some famous corpses had very curious fates. Seattle writer Bess Lovejoy is author of "Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses." She joins us.

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Religion
9:00 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Conclave For A New Pope Begins

Police officers are seen outside St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Monday, March 11, 2013. Cardinals have gathered for their final day of talks before the conclave to elect the next pope amid debate over whether the Catholic Church needs a manager pope to clean up the Vatican's messy bureaucracy or a pastoral pope who can inspire the faithful and make Catholicism relevant again.
Credit AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

An historic conclave to select the new pope begins today. One hundred and fifteen cardinal-electors will vote one by one to select the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church. It's the first conclave in 600 years to take place while the previous pope is still living. What's the mood in Rome right now? Writer Tiffany Parks joins us live from St. Peter’s Square to explain the conclave process and which candidates have Rome buzzing.

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Seattle Mayoral Race
10:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Ron Sims And The Seattle Mayoral Race

Ron Sims in his former role as King County executive at the press conference that announced that President Obama nominated him to be deputy secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in 2009.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Former King County Executive Ron Sims has retired from his position as deputy secretary for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Will he join the race to be Seattle’s next mayor? He joins us to answer that question.  

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Seattle Politics
9:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Ask Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn
Credit Courtesy/City of Seattle

Last week, court-appointed monitor Merrick Bobb submitted his first-year plan for reforming the Seattle Police Department. On Friday, Mayor Mike McGinn accepted the plan, saying there's a mutual understanding that it's a living document that can be amended. Meanwhile, the Seattle Police Department is rolling out software that it claims will help predict where crimes are likely to occur. What's the proof that it works? Have a question for the mayor? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Your Take On The News

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes clash over police reform. Seattle Public Schools comes under federal review over a racial disparity in how it disciplines students. Washington state floats sending its Hanford nuclear waste to New Mexico. And one week after sequestration, spending cuts caused by failure to reach a budget deal begin to make an impact in Washington state. What’s your take on the news? Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Musical Performance
9:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl Live In Studio

Shelby Earl performing at Neumos in 2011.
Credit Photo Credit/Dave Lichterman For KEXP

Seattle singer-songwriter Shelby Earl released her debut album, the folk-rock "Burn the Boats," in 2011. Since then she’s been touring and working on her second album, due out this year. She stops by the studio to play a few songs ahead of her trip to Austin's South by Southwest festival.

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Police Reform
10:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Connie Rice On Seattle Police Reform

Seattle Police on patrol.
Credit Flickr Photo/ Eric Peacock

A plan from the court-appointed monitor overseeing Seattle’s police reforms to address biased policing and excessive use of force within the SPD was overshadowed this week by a standoff between Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes. The two argued publicly over who has authority to act on the city’s behalf. Yesterday, Mayor McGinn said he regretted the public argument and called for a pause. L.A.-based civil rights attorney Connie Rice is advising the mayor's office as the city moves forward on a consent decree with the Justice Department. We’ll speak with her about the work so far and what she calls a “quest for trust” in Seattle.

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Politics
9:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Winning The White House In 2016

White House.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ivan Makarov

In an interview with Fox News earlier this week, Mitt Romney said that failing to reach minority voters was his biggest mistake of the 2012 campaign. What will it take to win the next election? UW Professor David Domke says winning over voters in so-called "carve-out states" — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — will be one key to victory. He joins us with rules of the road for winning the White House in 2016.

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