Weekday

No longer on air.

Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

Twitter: @KUOWsteve | Facebook: KUOWsteve

To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

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News And Analysis
10:00 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Your Take On The News: IRS, NBA And DUI

Flickr Photo/Tom Lohdan

The White House has received a lot of criticism this week over three issues that have gained national attention. A series of emails were released by the White House in relation to the Benghazi hearing. The IRS seems to have been targeting political leaning groups, in particular conservative ones, for audits. Journalists from the Associated Press had their phone records obtained by the government without their knowledge. How do these latest controversies effect the political climate in Washington D.C.?

Also, Washington Governor Jay Inslee has unveiled his top three budget priorities for the special session, the National Transportation Safety Board wants to lower the legal alcohol limit to 0.05, and 400 people showed up to a King County Council meeting this week to object to the potential cuts in bus service.

Finally, will this be the last time that Eli Sanders, C.R. Douglas and Knute Berger have to talk about the NBA, the Sacramento Kings and the Sonics on our panel?

Write to us at weekday@kuow.org to tell us what news stories you have been following this week.

Science
9:00 am
Fri May 17, 2013

The Latest News In Biotech And Comedian Paul Reiser

Flickr Photo/Horia Varlan

 New News In Biotechnology
The American Society of Clinical Oncology conference is convening in two weeks. At the conference physicians and drug makers will be discussing the emergence of cancer immunotherapy. Also, local diagnostic companies have been cultivating a rich understanding of the human genome. Their discoveries are leading to new diagnostic tests and treatments. Luke Timmerman, national biotech editor for Xconomy brings us the latest news in biotechnology.  

A Conversation With Paul Reiser
Paul Reiser is an actor, writer and stand-up comedian.  Television fans fondly remember him for the NBC series Mad About You which he co-created and starred in.  He’s also author of three books, most recently "Familyhood," about his life as a married father of two boys.  

Weekend Weather Forecast
Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

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Politic & Government
10:26 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine And Radio Retrospective

Flickr photo/topquark22

 Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine
Every month, King County Executive Dow Constantine joins us to chat about issues facing King County. Today he’s here to discuss the possible cuts to King County Metro, Dow’s re-election campaign, and of course Seattle’s unyielding desire for an NBA franchise. If you have a question for the King County Executive, feel free to give us a call at 206-543-5869 or toll-free at 800-289-5869.  
 
Radio Retrospective: When Music and Comedy Merge
Radio had a huge effect on the music industry. Suddenly musicians had regular work composing and performing on radio dramas.  Radio also turned select musicians into actors.  What happens when music and comedy merge?

A Lunch Recommendation
For our Thursday lunch recommendation, food writer Sara Dickerman profiles the Blossom Restaurant in Renton.   If you prefer to cook for yourself, she suggests “The Duke’s Table: The Complete Book of Vegetarian Italian Cooking.”

Health
8:43 am
Thu May 16, 2013

No Sonics This Time, Art Of Our City, And The Book Of Woe

Darian Asplund and Ahkeenu Musa with the band Kore Ionz played a gig in Seattle wearing their Sonics gear, May 15.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Kings Stay In Sacramento
The inevitable was confirmed yesterday in Dallas by NBA commissioner David Stern. In a 22-8 vote, the NBA Board of Governors voted to keep the Sacramento Kings in Sacramento. Investor Chris Hansen said the struggle makes the payoff sweeter and that he hopes the Sonics will return to Seattle eventually. We’ll talk with Ben Adler from Capital Public Radio in Sacramento and Art Thiel in Seattle on how the decision came to be.

Art Of Our City: The Massive Monkees
Earlier this year the hip-hop dance troupe Massive Monkees opened their first official dance studio, called the Beacon.  As part of a Seattle program to invigorate empty storefronts in the city, the Monkees applied for and received a three-month residency in a storefront in the Chinatown-International District.  Over the course of that residency, the Beacon offered classes for students as young as three up to their 50s and beyond. Now Massive Monkees' official residency is over, but they have the opportunity to make the Beacon permanent.  The landlord has agreed to a longer lease with one catch:  They need to raise some money for capital repairs.  To that end, they’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign. We revisit a tour we took to the Beacon in February of this year.

The Book Of Woe
The American Psychiatric Association is currently revising the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a tool used by clinicians to diagnose patients with mental disorders. According to Gary Greenberg it is more like an “anthology of suffering.” Greenberg is a psychotherapist and author of the new book, “The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry.” In his book he explains the history of the DSM and how the current revision of the DSM-5 is, as he argues, the most flawed yet. He says the DSM turns suffering into a commodity, leading to over- and misdiagnosis of mental illness.

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International
10:00 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Robert Horton's SIFF Picks And News From Canada And Commerce

Seattle International Film Festival logo

Canada, Culture And Commerce
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada.  Film critic Robert Horton joins us with the films he's looking forward to seeing at this year's Seattle International Film Festival. Then, Jon Talton brings us the latest business news on Microsoft, Boeing and the Dow.

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Health
9:00 am
Wed May 15, 2013

The NBA Meets, The SIFF Festival Opens And The Cost Of Health Care

Flickr photo/Jose Goulao

The End Of The Seattle/Sacramento Kings Saga?
Months of speculation about the NBA’s return to Seattle could end today. League owners are in Dallas to vote on Chris Hansen’s deal to buy the Sacramento Kings and move the team to Seattle. Meanwhile, a rival group of NBA-backed Sacramento investors is waiting in the wings to keep the team in town. Seattle Times reporter Bob Condotta joins us from Dallas.

Seattle International Film Festival Opens
It’s mid-May, which means summer is around the corner. But before you frolic outdoors, you’ll probably head into a movie theater for the annual Seattle International Film Festival. Organizers bill it as the biggest film festival in North America. Get a sneak preview with the minds behind the madness.

The Cost Of Health Care
Last week the government released costs for 100 common procedures at hospitals around the country.  The numbers varied wildly between geographic regions, but also between hospitals in the same city. University of Washington professor Aaron Katz explains what that means for consumers.

Veterans
10:00 am
Tue May 14, 2013

The Challenges Facing Female Veterans And Greendays Gardening Panel

Flickr photo/Expert Infantry

 The Challenges Facing Female Veterans
Women comprise 14 percent of the military, but VA hospital services and the military system are still primarily male-oriented.

Seattle US Marine veteran, Angela Arellano, and local post-traumatic stress disorder expert, Bridget Cantrell, appear in a new documentary by independent filmmaker Marcia Rock called “Service: When Women Come Marching Home.” They talk about the challenges facing disabled female veterans and how PTSD is addressed. Also, military sexual trauma remains a major issue.

Washington Senator Patty Murray introduced the Combating Military Sexual Assault Act of 2013 last Tuesday. We'll ask them how the act has been received among female veterans.

Greendays Gardening Panel
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert and vegetable gardening expert.  They answer your gardening questions every Tuesday. Call 206.543.5869 with your gardening questions, or email them to us at weekday@kuow.org    

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Arts and Entertainment
9:00 am
Tue May 14, 2013

New Music And Writing Nonfiction

Flickr photo/Brett Levin

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut? We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists. Branch out with new music recommendations every Tuesday at 9:20 a.m. KUOW’s Dave Beck focuses on William Henry Fry, a Philadelphia-born journalist, composer and outspoken advocate for American music.

Writing Nonfiction With Susan Orlean
Susan Orlean spends a lot of time working on her nonfiction. She spent 10 years researching her most recent book “Rin Tin Tin,” for example. Susan Orlean talks about her process and her passions and what it means to devote yourself to a subject for so long.

Understanding Cyber Security
A rise in the amount of cyber attacks has drawn concern over the safety of private information. Hackers will target anything from The Onion’s Twitter page to the processing systems of energy corporations. Their motivations range from political to criminal, be it stealing confidential information or debilitating essential operations.

In a world that relies more and more on technologies to run and store our lives, cyber security is a paramount concern. UW Professor Tadayoshi Kohno studies technological security and the methods of hackers. He joins us to discuss cyber security.     

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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Music
11:51 am
Mon May 13, 2013

The Onlies: Seattle High School Students Make Beautiful Music

The Onlies Play Live in KUOW Performance Studio
Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman interviews The Onlies.

When it comes to musical talent, there's no shortage in Seattle. The city boasts a thriving indie rock scene, great jazz and classical musicians, and the country's most popular hip-hop act, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. 

But the string trio The Onlies are little outside the norm. For one thing, Sami Braman, Ryan Calcagno and Leo Shannon play fiddle-inspired old-time and traditional tunes. And for another, despite performing together for a decade, none of the three is old enough to have a driver's license.

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Arts and Entertainment
10:00 am
Mon May 13, 2013

This Week In Olympia, What Makes A Good Death, And The Onlies

The Onlies in Big Sur, 2012.
Courtesy The Onlies

This Week In Olympia
The state legislature begins its special session today. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a  look at what to expect.

What Makes A Good Death?
Retired pulmonary and critical care doctor, Jim deMaine, has seen his fair share of good and bad deaths.  He shares his views on making a good and peaceful exit.  

The Music Of The Onlies
Samantha Braman, Riley Calcagno and Leo Shannon have been playing fiddle since they were 6, 4 and 5, respectively. Now 10 years later they’ve released their first full-length CD, "Setting Out To Sea." As freshmen at Garfield High School, The Onlies play their folk string music at concerts, festivals, weddings, dances; busking from Port Townsend to Portland, Ore. They’ve been a band for five years, creating original fiddle-driven music as well as traditional Celtic, old-time, American and Canadian inspired tunes.

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Politics & Government
9:00 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Ask The Seattle Mayor

Courtesy/City of Seattle

Ask Mayor McGinn
Chris Hansen has upped his bid for the Sacramento Kings by another $75 million. We will ask Mayor Mike McGinn about the future of the Seattle Sonics and whether the city will build a stadium without a team.

Also, we’ll ask the mayor for his take on May Day, Seattle parks, new Seattle Police Department hiring rules and just what happened with those guns turned peace bricks? He will be in to answer those questions, and if you have any questions for the mayor call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

What To Expect From The NBA This Week
The NBA Board of Governors are meeting this Wednesday to decide whether or not to approve the relocation of the Sacramento Kings to Seattle. King 5 reporter Chris Daniels has been following the saga from its onset. He regularly tweets updates on the Sacramento Kings and NBA decision.   

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News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Your Take On The News

NBA commissioner David Stern, April 2007.
Cody Mulcahy

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and C.R. Douglas.

Mayor McGinn announced the guns the city collected in the gun buyback would be turned into peace plaques. However a majority of the guns have already been melted down into rebar. It turns out we will have to wait until the next gun buyback to get our plaques of peace.

The NBA is due to announce its final decision on the Sacramento Kings next week. David Stern has a chance to redeem himself in Seattle, however he probably won't.

The special legislative session starts Monday in Olympia and top of the priority list is the budget. 

While it has only been a few months since the last presidential election, pundits already have an eye on every potential 2016 candidate. Chris Christie's weight loss surgery makes him a viable contender according to some. Washington state's former Governor Chris Gregoire was polled as a favorable 2016 contender — in Washington state that is.

What are the stories that caught your attention this week? Call us at 206.543.5869, email weekday@kuow.org or use #weekinreview to share your thoughts with us on Twitter during the show.

Social Issues
9:00 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The Tribes And Same-Sex Marriage, Science News, And Beverly Washburn

The Suquamish Tribe Recognized Same-Sex Marriage In 2011: Will Other Tribes?
In March, a Northern Michigan Indian tribe became the third in the US to recognize same-sex marriage. The Suquamish Tribal Council voted to recognize same-sex marriage in 2011. Other tribes have passed laws against. And the US Supreme Court is expected to issue a landmark marriage ruling this summer. Ron Whitener, executive director at Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, explains how the nation’s 563 recognized tribes are approaching the issue.

What’s New In Science News?  
Local virologists are tracking the latest flu in China, and the economics of studying science have led to some new ways to raise money for research. Sally James, Northwest science writer tells us what’s new in science news.

A Conversation With Former Child Star Beverly Washburn
Chances are you’ve seen Beverly Washburn perform, but you didn’t know her name. Have you seen Old Yeller? She was the little girl, Lisbeth. Washburn grew up performing opposite Hollywood greats like Lou Costello and Bing Crosby.   

Weekend Weather Forecast
How will the weather be for Mother's Day this Sunday? Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

Social Issues
10:00 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Defining Genius, Radio Retrospective, And A Lunch Pick

Audio tape reels.
Flickr Photo/Carbon Arc

Your Bike Helmet Isn't As Safe As You Think
You probably think your bicycle helmet keeps you safe getting a concussion. You’re wrong. It doesn’t. Most helmets only prevent skull fractures. As a result, bicycle deaths are down, but concussions and other brain injuries are on the rise as biking becomes more popular. Writer Bruce Barcott explains that some helmet manufactures have ignored the concussion problem because they believed it couldn’t be fixed. Others thought consumers would be unwilling to pay more for a protection they assume they already have.

Who's A Genius?
We often toss around the word “genius,” but what does it really mean? How does the definition of genius change depending on region or expertise? Eleven years ago, the staff at The Stranger weekly newspaper came up with the tongue-in-cheek Genius Awards for artists in the Seattle area. They were joking, but over the past decade, awards have gone to some people who would fit the dictionary description.

Radio Retrospective: From Live To Tape
During the early years of radio, performances were always live  — that is, until tape was invented and accepted by the industry. How did tape change radio?

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

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Arts and Entertainment
9:00 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Park Plans, Art Of Our City, And Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not!”

"We Are All Failing Them"

Seattle Parks Plan
Seattle officials want to hear from you about the future of the city’s parks. They're holding meetings this month to get public input on a parks plan that will guide where the city directs its resources in the years to come. We hear more from City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw.

Art Of Our City
A new live music and film project explores the line between ambition and bad luck as it applied to the Donner Party. "We Are All Failing Them" is a new commission by Seattle’s Northwest Film Forum (teaser below). It’s a song cycle performed live to film. We talk with composer Robin Holcomb about the latest venture in her wide-ranging career.

Neal Thompson On Robert “Believe It Or Not!” Ripley
A 1936 newspaper poll declared Robert Ripley the most popular man in America. How did a young, awkward newspaper cartoonist become a worldwide adventurer synonymous with the strange and unusual? Official Ripley biographer  Neal Thompson joins us.

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