Weekday

No longer on air.

Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

Twitter: @KUOWsteve | Facebook: KUOWsteve

To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

Composer ID: 
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Sex Education
6:00 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Gloria Steinem, Gang Violence And Talking To Kids About Sex

Flickr Photo/Ali Haines

Gloria Steinem: The Next 30 Years

Gloria Steinem, founder of Ms. Magazine, leader of the women’s movement and journalist, visited KUOW in 2006. Steve Scher talked with Steinem about what modern feminism means and her goals for the next 30 years.

Gang Violence In Seattle And Tacoma

In 2006, Seattle and Tacoma saw a sudden surge in gang violence. Rival gangs were battling over street corners and engaging in drive-by shootings. Steve Scher talked with Lt. Eric Sano of the Seattle Police Department, Gabriel Morales who trains law enforcement officials to prevent gang violence, and Dennis Turner, a former gang-member-turned prevention specialist in Pierce County. Steve asks why these gangs were proliferating, what can be do to prevent them and we hear personal stories of gang life.

Talking To Kids About Sex

It may well be the subject every parent dreads: the sex talk. But Amy Lang, founder of Birds + Bees + Kids, is here to make it easier. Marcie Sillman talked with Lang back in 2006 about strategies to talk to kids about sex.

Presidential History
6:00 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Products For Big Americans, George Carlin And The Life Of Alexander Hamilton

Ron Chernow's biography "Alexander Hamilton."

Big Americans: From Comfortable Products To Confidence

     

Americans are bigger than ever, and many are finding the need for products, such as seat belt extenders, to make their lives more comfortable. In 2004, Steve Scher talked with Susan V. James, founder of Abundance Northwest, and Bill Fabrey, then president of Amplestuff.com, about fat acceptance and how products can help build confidence.

A Conversation With Comedian George Carlin

American comedian, actor and writer George Carlin was known for his black humor. His comedy routine “Seven Dirty Words” remains to this day the same list of words deemed unsuitable for broadcast programming. Carlin passed away in June, 2008. Steve Scher talked with George Carlin back in 1997 about his life, pet peeves and politically correct language.

The Life Of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton spent his childhood in the Caribbean. He left to become an architect of modern American government. Historian Ron Chernow chronicled Hamilton’s life in the biography, "Alexander Hamilton." Steve Scher talked with Ron Chernow in 2004 about Hamilton’s time in war, his education and the perhaps misplaced bad rap Hamilton often receives.

War Writers
6:00 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Writing About War, Black In Seattle And Maggie Greenwald

Anthony Swofford's book "Jarhead"

The Art Of Writing About War

War is hard to describe. In his memoir, "Jarhead," Gulf War Marine Anthony Swofford writes, "This is not funny, the possibility of death, but like many combatants before us we laugh to obscure the tragedy of our cheap, squandered lives." Swofford and writers Dave Danelo and Michael Yon joined us in 2008 to discuss the challenges of war and the challenges of writing about it.

Black In Seattle: What It Was Like In 2002

Back in 2002, Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large asked his readers to share thoughts on what it’s like to be black in Seattle. In 2002, living patterns were shifting rapidly, and a few shootings put race on the public’s mind. Steve Scher talked with Large and listeners about what it was like to be black in Seattle.

Director Maggie Greenwald On Making “The Ballad of Little Jo”

Maggie Greenwald is an actress, director and screenwriter. She is perhaps best known for writing and directing “The Ballad of Little Jo,” a film based on the true story of a woman attempting to escape the stigma of having a child out of wedlock by living as a man. Marcie Sillman talked with Greenwald in 1993 about making “The Ballad of Little Jo.”

Ocean Debris
6:00 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Bugs, Bill Nye And Flotsam

Flickr Photo/Efrafan Days

Sue Hubbell: Author, Beekeeper And Bug Lover

Sue Hubbell is the author of many books on entomology, including “A Book of Bees: And How to Keep Them.” She wrote for The New Yorker, Smithsonian and Time. Steve Scher talked with Hubbell back in 1993 about the many reasons to appreciate bugs.

Bill Nye On Getting People Interested In Science

Bill Nye, forever dubbed The Science Guy, is an author, comedian, scientist and former television host. Though his Disney/PBS show, "Bill Nye The Science Guy," is long off air, his legacy as a science educator lives on. Many people can still remember this tune "Bill, Bill, Bill, Bill!" Dave Beck talked with Nye in 1993, the first year his television show aired.

Flotsam With Curtis Ebbesmeyer: The Secret Life Of Ocean Debris

Oceans are full of many mysterious things, some of which make their way to shore. Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer tracks the debris that makes its way around the world. Steve Scher talked with Ebbesmeyer back in 2003 about the many objects — plastic ducks, glass balls, tires — that show up on our beaches and what that tells us about our oceans.

Live Surgery
6:00 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Steve Allen, Live Surgery, And Salman Rushdie

Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Steve Allen: On Television And Performing

Steve Allen was an American television personality, musician, composer, comedian and writer. He was the first host of “The Tonight Show,” and one New York Times article dubbed him "The Father of All Talk-Show Hosts."  Allen passed away in 2000. Steve Scher talked with Allen in 1993 about television, creativity and making people laugh.

Behind The Scenes: Surgery

As part of Weekday’s How-To series, Steve Scher sat down with two surgeons: Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, chairman of neurological surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and Dr. Eric Froines, then-chief of general surgery at Capitol Hill Specialty Center Group Health Permanente. Scher asked what the life of a surgeon is like and what it feels like to repair human brains, and took a field trip to a live surgery.

Salman Rushdie On Starting The Iraq War

In late 2002, the prospect of a war in Iraq was looming. British-Indian author and essayist Salman Rushdie sat down with Steve Scher. Rushdie discusses his concerns about the potential of a war in Iraq and his thoughts on terrorism.

Imaginary Friends
6:00 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Imaginary Friends, Ruth Reichl, And Robert Olen Butler

Flickr Photo/Jared Eberhardt

Imaginary Friends: Can’t Live With 'Em, Can’t Live Without 'Em

Most of us have fond memories of our childhood friends, but what about our friends that weren’t real? Imaginary friends come in many shapes and sizes, and they often provide handy scapegoats. Steve Scher talked with Marjorie Taylor, professor and head of psychology at the University of Oregon and author of "Imaginary Companions." He also talked to Stephanie Carlson, professor of child development at the University of Minnesota, about where our imaginary friends come from and why they leave.

Ruth Reichl On How And What Americans Eat

At the end of 2009, legendary Gourmet Magazine printed its last issue. Steve Scher talked with then-editor and author Ruth Reichl just four days before the announcement of the magazine’s end about how and what Americans are eating.

Robert Olen Butler On Vietnamese Expat Communities

Robert Olen Butler is the author of “A Good Scent from a Stranger Mountain,” a collection of short stories about Vietnamese expats. In his book, Butler recalls many stories from Vietnamese expats around the world and the often, as he deems them, temperamental dynamics of these communities. Steve Scher talked with Butler back in 1992.

Life And Culture
10:00 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Girls Gone Mild, Surfing, And Fantasy Fiction

Cold water and threatening currents don't keep avid surfers away from the waves in the Pacific Northwest.
Flickr Photo/daisydoubleoh

Girls Gone Mild: Demands For Modest Fashion

In 2004, an 11-year-old girl in Redmond wrote a letter to Nordstrom complaining that the choice of clothing available to her was too revealing; midriff shirts, low-riding pants. Today many still worry about the revealing clothing options for young girls. KUOW’s Steve Scher talked with Dr. Pepper Schwartz, professor of sociology at the University of Washington, and Laura Portolese Dias, an instructor of business administration now at Central Washington University, about where these trends come from and where to find modest clothing for children.

Surfing: Pacific Northwest Style

Frankie Avalon surfed in every beach party movie he made while Annette Funicello looked on lovingly. The movie "Blue Crush" profiled a bunch of girls who surfed competitively. Even Elvis surfed in one of his movies. But none of them surfed in the Pacific Northwest, which has the best swells in the world according to a study by legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau. The Pacific Northwest also has notoriously cold water, but that's not the worst of a surfer's worries compared to the strong currents and undertows. Marcie Sillman talked with Bobby Arzadon, owner and founder of the Perfect Wave Shop in Kirkland, and Eric Fleming, then middle school art teacher and longboard surfer, about surfin’ in the PNW.

The Allure Of Fantasy

Authors Terry Brooks and Greg Keyes have sold millions of copies of books. Both writers have legions of fans around the nation and the world, and both are part of a parallel universe of fantasy and science fiction: "Star Wars," "Star Trek," "The Lord of the Rings;" the list could go on and on. In 2004, Steve Scher talked with Brooks and Keyes about writing, working with George Lucas and the lasting allure of fantasy.

Science And Stories
9:00 am
Mon August 19, 2013

War Stories, The Science Of Aggregation, And David Sedaris

Flickr Photo/NOAA's National Ocean Service

War Stories

War is often remembered through history textbooks. Shortly before Veteran’s Day 2004, Weekday took a look at war through the eyes of soldiers and their families. Steve Scher talked with two Medal of Honor recipients: retired Air Force Col. Joe M. Jackson and retired Army Maj. Gen. Patrick H. Brady.

Aggregation: Swarming, Flocking And Schooling

Many of us have experienced "the wave" at a baseball game, and most of us have marveled at fish swimming in schools or starlings whirling around in the evening sky. In 2009, Steve Scher talked with Julia Parish, associate director of the school of aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington, about why animals move together.

David Sedaris On Smoking

In this past month, Washington state cut funding for the smoking cessation hotline. Humorist David Sedaris has a different approach to quit smoking. Instead of calling the hotline, Sedaris moved to Japan. His story "The Smoking Section" is just one of 17 essays in his book “When You Are Engulfed in Flames. Steve Scher talked with David Sedaris back in 2008 about smoking and other tales.

Weekly News Review
10:00 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Your Take On The News

Your Take On The News
It’s Friday — time to talk over the week’s news. Our regular panel of journalists: Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders are in to talk about the news brewing inside the city and beyond. What stories caught your attention? What hasn’t been covered enough? What happened this week that made your blood boil? What’s your take on the news?

Weekend Weather Forecast
Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

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Goodbye From Weekday
9:00 am
Fri August 16, 2013

News From Egypt, Animal Eye Surgery, And Inside Weekday Warehouse

KUOW Photo/Katy Sewell

An Update From Egypt
Tens of thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters took to the streets of Cairo today, following yesterday’s violent crackdown by the Egyptian military in which more than 600 people were killed. The protests come more than six weeks after President Mohamed Morsi was deposed by the military. We’ll get the very latest from journalist D. Parvaz. She’s covering the situation in Cairo for Al Jazeera English. Then Dr. Stephen Majeski, political science professor at the University of Washington, explains how President Obama’s foreign policy plan has been working in Egypt.

On the Job: Animal Eye Surgery
Katy Sewall visits the Seattle Animal Eye Clinic to watch Dr. Thomas Sullivan perform a Vitreoretinal surgery on a miniature poodle.  

A Visit To The Weekday Warehouse
Steve Scher and Katy Sewall meet at the “Weekday Warehouse” to unearth some of the strange and wonderful interviews that were featured on Weekday.

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Northwest Hip-Hop
10:00 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A New Chairman Of The Fed, 30 Years Of Northwest Hip-Hop, Radio Retrospective And Sara Dickerman

Flickr Photo/wiuxflickr

  

Fed Reserve Chair
This fall, President Obama will select a new chairman of the Federal Reserve to replace two-term Chairman Ben Bernanke. During a news conference on Friday, the president mentioned two candidates he’s considering: former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers and Janet Yellen, current vice-chairwoman of the Fed. Some critics are calling for the president to widen his search. Who else should be considered for the post? How big of an impact could the new Fed chairman have on the economy?

30 Years of Northwest Hip-Hop
Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, Sir Mix-A-Lot, The Blue Scholars and Shabazz Palaces. Forget grunge, Seattle’s got hip-hop. Hip-hop is as Northwest as The Wailers; as much a part of our cultural landscape as Nirvana, Soundgarden or Mudhoney. MC Geo of the Blue Scholars and Dr. Daudi Abe, author and professor at Seattle Central Community College, join us for a look back at the people, culture and industry that made three decades of local hip-hop music.

Radio Retrospective: The Alternate Lives of Sinister Hosts
During radio’s Golden Age, mystery shows were often hosted by a “sinister” host. Characters like The Man in Black, The Whistler and The Mysterious Traveler. Who are the men behind these shadowy narrators, and what other roles did they play throughout their career?

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Today she highlights Blind Pig Bistro. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook.

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Pacific Northwest Ballet
9:00 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Vaccination Rates In Washington State, Art Of Our City, Peter Boal And Pinball History!

Flickr Photo/Kryziz Bonny

Washington State Vaccination Rates
During the 2008-2009 school year, Washington state kindergarteners were the least vaccinated in the United States. The opt-out rate of at least once vaccine was 7.6 percent. According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control, the opt-out rate has decreased to 4.6 percent. It’s a marked improvement for sure, but Washington state still has the seventh highest vaccination opt-out rate in the country. How have public health officials tackled this issue? Why is Washington state such a likely to place for parents to opt their kids out of vaccinations?

Art Of Our City
Religious leaders often talk about the role of devotion in their work, but what about artists? Or just regular people? Seattle writer Rebecca Brown has invited a range of Seattle-area folks to contemplate devotion. The result is an exhibition at the Hedreen Gallery at Seattle University. What does devotion mean in your life?

Pacific Northwest Ballet Artistic Director Peter Boal
Eight years ago the leadership changed hands at Pacific Northwest Ballet. Peter Boal came to Seattle to assume the role of PNB’s artistic director. The former New York City Ballet principal dancer was committed to PNB’s focus on the work of choreographer George Balanchine. But Boal has expanded PNB’s repertoire, bringing in much more new work and focusing on such choreographers as Twyla Tharp and Christopher Wheeldon, hot shots of contemporary dance making.

Pinball: History You Play!  
Everyone has played pinball, but do you remember that it was once banned? Producer Katy Sewall visits the Seattle Pinball Museum to find the stories behind the fun. Why was the “tilt” invented? What recurring themes show up year after year? How has the sound of pinball changed through the decades?

Canada, Culture, Commerce
10:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

News From Canada, Robert Horton On Film, And Tech News

Flickr Photo/Alex Indigo (CC BY-NC-ND)

Les Layne from the Victoria Time Colonist brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the movies. Then, Todd Bishop brings us the latest business and technology news.  

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Nature Conservancy
9:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence In Egypt, PacMed Building And Peter Kareiva

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.

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Greendays
10:00 am
Tue August 13, 2013

The Transportation Package, Letters Written In Wartime And Gardening

Flickr Photo/Mark Atwood

  

Olympia And The Transportation Package
When state lawmakers adjourned in June, they left a $10 billion transportation package on the table. Now, senate leaders have announced they’ll hold hearings in the fall on the state’s transportation priorities and how to pay for them. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield joins us with details.
 

Letters Written In Wartime
Wartime letters capture a uniquely vivid history not found in text books. They place us in the author’s shoes. Take this quote from a letter written in 1941: “A man just brought us our gas masks. I don’t know why I’m writing this, because if we’re hit with a bomb they won’t find enough of me — let alone this letter. I imagine it’s to show myself that I can be calm under fire.”  We experience history by reading the letters of those who lived it.


Greendays Gardening Panel
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert and vegetable gardening expert.  They’re on hand to answer your gardening questions. 

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