What's Your Local Wonder Question?

For a previous Local Wonder assignment, KUOW reporter Deborah Wang asked Washingtonians if they believe they have an accent.
For a previous Local Wonder assignment, KUOW reporter Deborah Wang asked Washingtonians if they believe they have an accent.
Credit KUOW photo/Isolde Raftery

Local Wonder is an experiment in a new method of storytelling at KUOW. It begins with your questions. 

Submit any question* about Seattle, the Puget Sound region, or its people via the form below. Every other month, KUOW editors pick three questions and ask our listeners to vote on their favorite. Whichever question gets the most votes is then investigated by a KUOW reporter. 

Follow KUOW on Facebook or Twitter to stay up-to-date on all our Local Wonder stories.

*We think the most successful questions have at least one of these qualities:

  • Raises issues unique to this region
  • It's open-ended (i.e., not a "yes/no" question)
  • It sparks conversation or friendly debate
  • Has potential to teach well-established locals something they didn't already know about their community

Scroll down to browse the archive of previously answered Local Wonder questions.

Still have questions about the project? Contact localwonder@kuow.org.

Seattle gets more clouds than blue sky, so do we really buy that many sunglasses?
Flickr Photo/Phil Buckley

Do Seattleites buy more sunglasses than residents of other cities?

Was there really a dead horse in Ballard’s water supply in the early 1900s?

And did prostitutes start the Seattle School District?

Listener Kristie Fisher of Belltown asked about Seattle’s urban myths as part of our Local Wonder project. So we asked our Facebook friends to share their favorites and chose a few for KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel to investigate.

KUOW reporter Deborah Wang asked native Washingtonians if they believe they have an accent. They said no. But they also pronounced "caught" and "cot" the same way -- one of the subtle distinctions of this region's accent.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Do Pacific Northwesterners have an accent and what does it sound like? Listener Molly in Tacoma asked that question as part of KUOW's Local Wonder series. 

Molly never thought she had an accent until she moved to Virginia and was told she had one.

Some regional accents are obvious. But many in the Pacific Northwest describe themselves as speaking “standard,” “normal,” or “plain” English. But is that really the case? What do the experts say?

Who Are The Descendants Of Seattle's Early Families?

Oct 19, 2014
KUOW/Joshua McNichols

What are the descendants of Seattle's pioneers up to? KUOW Listener Ben Lee wanted to know.

For KUOW's Local Wonder project, I escaped into Seattle's past in hopes of turning up the present. Turned out that finding Seattle's dead pioneers was the easy part. 

They’re all in one spot: Lakeview Cemetery on Capitol Hill.

KUOW Photo/Jake Warga

What’s on the bottom of Lake Washington? Listener Merry McCreery wanted to know.

For KUOW Public Radio’s Local Wonder project, I embarked on a strange journey that took me to the heart of this vast lake that separates Seattle from the Eastside. What I learned was astonishing, often gross and, on occasion, heartbreaking.

KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

KUOW listener Nancy Beaudet had a question: Why are there so few mosquitos in Seattle?

As part of our Local Wonder series, we sent our environmental reporter, Ashley Ahearn, onto the muddy trails of the Washington Park Arboretum to find out why skeeters don’t plague Seattle summers.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

When John Reese moved from northern Illinois to Seattle last year he kept hearing people talking about the Seattle Freeze. So far he hasn’t seen any sign of it. In fact, he says people are nicer here than they are back home.