Transportation

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

When the Capitol Hill and University link light rail stations open up in about a year, it will change how many people get around Seattle. Something else is changing too: the way King County Metro organizes its bus routes. It’s considering two very different strategies. At a series of open houses this month, it’s asking the public for feedback.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols has more.

Picture yourself standing at a bus station in Nairobi, Kenya. The unwritten rule is that none of these minibuses (shared taxis, called matatus) will leave until they have enough passengers. That can be around 20 or more people. So every matatu has a tout shouting at top volume — even banging on the side of the bus — to corral more customers.

All of a sudden, what looks like a discotheque on wheels pulls up.

The United Steelworkers union and major oil refiners have reached a tentative contract settlement.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about his 10-year transportation plan

Marcie Sillman talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about a vote in Vancouver, B.C., on a tax increase to fund a $7.5 billion transportation package.

A group of Republican lawmakers in Idaho is offering a plan they say could raise up to $81 million for road and bridge repairs by next year.

Workers stand on the reddish-gray surface of Bertha.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bertha the drill should be back at work on the tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct by August. There’s still some unstable soil left to drill through.

Officials will be watching Pioneer Square for patches of settling. After that, the ground becomes more firm, and project managers predict smooth drilling at the maximum rate of 65 feet per day.

Rainier Avenue street Seattle
Flickr Photo/Matthew Rutledge (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phyllis Porter, outreach coordinator and events specialist at Rainier Valley Greenways Project, about the Seattle Department of Transportation's plan to improve traffic safety on Rainier Avenue.

How Big Of A Risk Are Oil Trains?

Mar 6, 2015
oil train, transportation
Flickr Photo/Russ Allison

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lisa Copeland, of the Washington State Department of Ecology, about the risk oil trains could pose to the state.

Also, Reynolds speaks to Kevin Book, an analyst from ClearView Energy Partners in Washington, D.C, and with Kristen Boyles, attorney for environmental law firm Earth Justice, about the implications of oil trains in our region.

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House Wednesday approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

Tacoma Link Light Rail train approaches
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Politicians in Olympia are negotiating the final size of a transportation package. But we found out this week it may not be as much as some people hoped. Transit advocates hope the final package will pay to extend light rail from Seattle to Everett and Tacoma. 

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols went to Tacoma to find out more.

Northwest Officials Unite Against Coal And Oil Trains

Mar 4, 2015

More than 150 elected officials from across the Northwest have teamed up to speak out against coal and oil trains. Their new group, the Safe Energy Leadership Alliance, held its third meeting in Portland Tuesday.

Washington's King County Executive Dow Constantine has stepped up to chair the group. It includes officials from Oregon, Washington, Idaho and British Columbia.

A line of Car2Gos in the South Lake Union district of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Car-sharing company Car2Go expanded in Seattle this week. That means a little more competition for parking spots that can already be hard to come by. Is the city trying to make life harder for car owners? And is that fair? Bill Radke talks with Seattle journalist Erica C. Barnett.

Rachel Martin owns and manages Ballard Blossom. She says she monitors the news, apps and public websites to determine the most efficient route for her delivery drivers.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Mayor Ed Murray laid out his 10-year transportation plan Monday. The move sets the stage for renewing the transportation levy that expires this year. He plans to reveal a new levy proposal in a few weeks.

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