Technology

Cockroaches are widely despised. They're attracted to filth. They frighten people, even give them nightmares.

But for a team of scientists at Texas A&M University, the roach is a hero: the first animal that humans might successfully transform into a robot, a hybrid of insect and machine that we can send anywhere to be our eyes and ears.

The Perfect Roach

Professor Hong Liang opens the door to a small laboratory with hundreds, maybe thousands, of cockroaches. It's not for the faint of heart.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Schneier, author of the new book, "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles To Capture Your Data and Control Your World."

Participants at the 5th annual Compassion Research Day at Facebook's headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Facebook unveiled new tools on Feb. 25 to help prevent suicide.
Courtesy of Forefront/Katie Simmons

Marcie Sillman talks with Jennifer Stuber, director of Forefront, a suicide prevention organization at the University of Washington, about their partnership with Facebook.

Also, we hear from Stephen Miller, Forefront's operation's manager, about his own experience with Facebook and suicide. 

Idaho’s long stretches of open highway could be testing grounds for driverless cars under a bill the state Senate passed Thursday.

smart phone texting app
Flickr Photo/AdamFagen (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ellen Selkie, who works in the Adolescent Medicine division at Seattle Children's Hospital, about her recent study on the effects of college cyber bullying. 

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Starbucks is set to expand mobile ordering to its Pacific Northwest stores. KUOW's Kim Malcolm talks with retail analyst Brian Sozzi of Belus Capital Advisors about why the not-just-coffee company wants to move you out of the line and onto your phone.

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about Apple's big event on wearable technology. 

The free dating app Tinder has launched a paid subscription service called Tinder Plus.

The paid tier offers more functions than the free app, but it comes with a catch: users over age 30 are being charged twice as much as younger subscribers for the same service.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Tinder Plus with Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal.

RP's husband works in the Seattle area on an H-1B  visa. They lived together in Seattle for a year and a half before RP returned to work in India, due to visa restrictions.
KUOW Photo/Harsha Vadlamani

Washington is one of the top states that brings in high-skilled foreign workers, filling thousands of jobs every year.

This week, those workers got some long-awaited news from the federal government: A blanket rule that barred their spouses from working will soon be lifted.

The South Lake Union trolley.
Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Facebook's expansion into South Lake Union. 

computer high school education
Flickr Photo/Berkeley Lab (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Randy Dorn, the state superintendent of public instruction, about his proposal to make schools prove their students are getting a 21st century education.

We also hear from local high school students with their thoughts on this idea.

Chris Stolte at a Tableau Customer Conference in 2013.
From Tableau's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds speaks with Chris Stolte, chief development officer and co-founder of Tableau Software, a Seattle data visualization company whose goal is to make tools accessible to people who are not data nerds.

Every day, Americans use a lot of digital data, from checking Facebook to sending email. It all seems kind of intangible – stored and processed in the cloud. But this data actually exists on a server at one of the millions of data centers across the country.

Public Records Requests: How Big Is Too Big?

Feb 13, 2015

Ross Reynolds speaks with Toby Nixon, president of the Washington Coalition for Open Government, about the possible impact of a large public records request from local computer programmer Tim Cleman, who asked the email communication from every state agency. 

State Attorney General Bob Ferguson has told Clemans his request was too broad and state agencies do not have to act on it.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s strong growth means full buses and congested roads. The City of Seattle says maybe it should also mean more help for commuters. It’s holding a hackathon, bringing people together to build new tools that can help everyone get around.

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