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Education
9:31 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Steve Jobs' Death Inspired Goal To Get Kids Coding

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we are going to tell you more about former Texas governor Ann Richards. There's a new HBO documentary about her, and we are going to speak with her daughter. But first, something we like to focus on a lot on this program, which is efforts to open up tech careers and education to young people. Computer programming is one of the most sought after skills in the job market.

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Data Wizard
3:00 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Big Promises And Big Problems: Nate Silver Talks Big Data

Nate Silver in KUOW's green room.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with Nate Silver, editor in chief of the ESPN's FiveThirtyEight blog, about the promise and peril of using big data to make predictions.

He is also the author of "The Signal and The Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — but Some Don't."

Windows Phone
1:52 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Microsoft Faces Challenge Bringing Nokia Business Into The Fold

Stephen Elop, executive vice president of Nokia shows off his colored shoe while talking about the colors available of the new Nokia Lumia 930 phones during a keynote address at the Microsoft Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014.
AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Microsoft says its purchase of Nokia's mobile phone business is complete. The deal is meant to help Microsoft deliver a Windows phone to challenge Apple and Google. However the company said it's only the first step in a journey to bring the two organizations together as one team.

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Apple Patent
12:25 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Using Technology To Fix The Texting-While-Driving Problem

Driving while distracted by your phone is a nationwide problem. A new proposed phone function from Apple could play a big role in helping teens — and adults — avoid accidents.
Nils Kahle iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 2:29 pm

On a Wisconsin street, a woman in a white hoodie stands frozen in the act of stepping out of the road and onto the curb, her left hand reaching behind her. As part of a public service announcement, she explains why she's there, as string music slowly plays under her voice.

"I had my brother in my hand, and all of a sudden my hand was empty," Aurie says as a car drives past. Her little brother, 8 years old at the time of the PSA, was left paralyzed after being hit by a car driven by a texting driver.

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Gates Foundation
12:38 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Why Bill Gates Fights Diseases Abroad, Not At Home

By ensuring vaccines are invented and distributed, Bill Gates says, his foundation is dramatically reducing the number of childhood deaths in poor countries.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 10:18 am

This week in Seattle, Bill and Melinda Gates are attending a meeting of the minds.

Five hundred of the world's top innovators in global health have gathered for the Global Health Product Development Forum, an annual event in which scientists, engineers, policymakers and activists work to develop new tools for fighting diseases.

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Social Media
3:20 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Why Seattle Author Maria Semple Hates Facebook And Twitter

Credit Flickr Photo/Jason Howie (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Seattle author Maria Semple about why she thinks social media is the biggest threat to writing and art since Peter Criss' first solo album.

Environment
3:03 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

First Earth Day Organizer Offers Advice On Handling Eco-Complacency

Environmental activist Denis Hayes.
Credit Flickr Photo/cactusbones (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with environmental activist Denis Hayes about some Earth Day advice for people who have become eco-complacent. Hayes served as the national coordinator to organize the first Earth Day in 1970.

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Amazon
1:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Online Sales Taxes Shift Consumer Behavior, Study Shows

Monica Chavez packs up a box at an Amazon.com fulfillment center Dec. 2, in Phoenix.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 2:34 pm

Technically, consumers are supposed to pay taxes on things they buy online. In fact, few do.

Congress is considering a bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act that would force many online sellers to collect sales taxes for the first time.

In the meantime, some states have already enacted so-called Amazon taxes, forcing the giant online retailer to collect sales taxes the same way traditional brick-and-mortar stores do.

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Technology
3:21 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

How Microsoft's Windows Phone Stacks Up Against Its Competitors

Windows phone.
Credit Flickr Photo/Tayla Lyell (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the Northwest tech industry and how the updates to Microsoft's Windows Phone 8.1 will impact its place in the growing smartphone market.

Law Enforcement Technology
2:48 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

How UW's Age-Progression Software Could Help Find Missing Kids

A single photo of a child (far left) is age progressed (left in each pair) and compared to actual photos of the same person at the corresponding age (right in each pair).
Courtesy of the University of Washington

Ross Reynolds talks with Robert Lowery, vice president of the Missing Children Division at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, about the new automated age-progression software developed at the University of Washington.

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Earthquake
2:42 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Why Some Buildings Aren't Ready For 'The Big One'

Credit Flickr Photo/Richard Walker (CC BY-NC-ND)

When disaster strikes, architects and engineers see their best laid plans put to the test.

When the Nisqually Earthquake struck in 2001, home repair expert Roger Faris was at the Phinney Neighborhood Center celebrating the retrofit of the former school lunchroom.

Steve Scher recently met with Faris and engineer Dan Say to point out the work that was done to reinforce the old school building. They say there are still hundreds of un-reinforced masonry buildings at risk if and when the next earthquake hits.

Biotech
10:28 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Bionic Bulldogs And Spider Goats: The Future Of Biotech's New Beasts

Artistic interpretation of the future of pets, the Genpet by Adam Brendejs.
Flickr Photo/Adam Brandejs

How is biotechnology changing our pets, our livestock and other wild things? Ross Reynolds talks with Emily Anthes, the author of "Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts," about how biotech will change our pets and livestock.

This interview originally aired on March 14, 2013.

OpenSSL Foundation
12:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 10:01 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Anthropological Study
12:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 9:29 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Mexico City Quake
3:20 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

The Challenges To Predicting Earthquakes

Credit Flickr Photo/Richard Walker (CC BY-NC-ND)

Moments before the magnitude-7.2 earthquake struck central and southern Mexico, people received a text message warning on their phones.

Ross Reynolds talks with John Vidale, Washington state seismologist and UW professor, about the challenges to predicting earthquakes.

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