Jesse Jackson visited Seattle on Wednesday, asking that the tech industry focus on hiring more people of color and women.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

Rev. Jesse Jackson called out Amazon during a visit to Seattle on Wednesday.

“The board of the directors is all white in 2015,” Jackson said at Northeastern University’s newest building on South Lake Union. “Our challenge is not just to point the blame, but to point out the solution. Which is inclusion.”

Ross Reynolds speaks with Joaquin Uy, a board member of the Filipino Community Center and communications director for the Low Income Housing Alliance, about how important fast internet is to immigrant and low-income communities.

Also, Reynolds talks with Michael Mattmiller, Seattle’s chief technology officer, about the release of a feasibility study for municipal run broadband internet that city officials say makes it too expensive to compete with private companies like Comcast and Century Link. 

Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the ethics of proposals by companies in this region -- like Microsoft -- to hire more foreign workers.

In 2001, Tim Hunt won a share of a Nobel Prize. In 2006, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. But in 2015, he's being widely criticized for his recent remarks about women in science, including: "when you criticize them, they cry."

Hunt, a biochemist, made that and other comments during a speech this week at the World Conference of Science Journalists that's being held in South Korea this week. He was quoted in a tweet that's since been shared hundreds of times, asking the audience to "let me tell you about my trouble with girls."

A few short years after voice mail was developed in the late 1970s, it quickly became an essential business tool.

But in the past few years, its use has been in decline. And some offices have opted to get rid of it altogether.

After JPMorgan Chase said last week it was canceling voice mail for most of its employees, I sent the bank's public relations department an email.

A bit later, there was that familiar red light on my desk phone:

On Friday, 24 robots and their masters will be going head-to-head in California for a $2 million prize. The robotics challenge is sponsored by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Those fearing the Pentagon-sponsored prize could signal the dawn of Terminator-style cyborgs needn't worry. "Even though they look like us, and they may look a little bit mean, there's really nothing inside," says Gill Pratt, the program manager running this competition. "What you're really seeing is a puppet."

It's a problem in a taxi economy if people don't like getting into cabs that are driven by strangers. A cab driver is a stranger almost by definition. But in the high-crime city of Nairobi, Kenya, people prefer to call up drivers they know or who their friends recommend.

An American named Jason Eisen spent years in Nairobi as a consultant until he had his big idea. He built an app that doesn't just tell you which taxis are close by, like Uber does. It also assigns the driver a trust score, by scouring riders' contacts and social media.

Amazon shipping box
Flickr Photo/Luke Dorny (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman rounds up the latest in Seattle-area tech news with Geekwire's Todd Bishop, including Amazon's new same-day delivery for customers in certain areas.

Jiya Bavishi was born deaf. For five years, she couldn't hear and she couldn't speak at all. But when I first meet her, all she wants to do is say hello. The 6-year-old is bouncing around the room at her speech therapy session in Dallas. She's wearing a bright pink top; her tiny gold earrings flash as she waves her arms.

"Hi," she says, and then uses sign language to ask who I am and talk about the ice cream her father bought for her.

You get a voicemail message from a friend. Her voice sounds a little ... weird. Like a chipmunk who had too much to drink.

After her message, you're told you can push a button on the phone and hear another kind of message: say, job listings in your neighborhood or tips on how to stop the spread of Ebola.

That's how a new game called Polly works. It was designed by computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University to help get useful information to people with little or no reading skills.

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Robi Ganguly, co-founder of the Seattle-based mobile startup Apptentive, about his company's goal to build a diverse workforce.

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

When President Obama took office back in 2009, "cybersecurity" was not a word that everyday people used. It wasn't debated. Then, mega-breaches against consumers, businesses and the federal government changed that.

The Federal Aviation Administration has recently granted clearance for takeoff to big batches of commercial drone operators.

food delivery
Flickr Photo/Mark Turnauckas (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about their investigation into the practices of the online restaurant delivery service OrderAhead. 

The challenge of strategizing the best route to work against the herd of other drivers can be as routine as the daily commute itself. A number of apps are out there to help shortcut one's route and evade traffic jams. But which ones are the most accurate? And how?

The All Tech Considered team put a few competing traffic apps to the test in Robert Siegel's usual short commute from Arlington, Va., to NPR's D.C. headquarters.

The Test Drive

This ride is about 15 minutes in no traffic. But it's now morning rush hour.