Technology

'Week in Review' panel Gyasi Ross, Ron Sims, Jonathan Martin and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

How come America isn’t mocking Washington state as unrepresentative and irrelevant? Also, why do people of color favor Hillary Clinton? A pilotless car self-drives around Kirkland, is that our future? And what is the lesson of the shooting in the Jungle?

Bill Radke interprets this week’s news with former King County Executive Ron Sims, lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross, and Seattle Times editorial writer Jonathan Martin.

OK, Google, Where Did I Put My Thinking Cap?

Feb 5, 2016

Take a look at this question: How do modern novels represent the characteristics of humanity?

If you were tasked with answering it, what would your first step be? Would you scribble down your thoughts — or would you Google it?

Terry Heick, a former English teacher in Kentucky, had a surprising revelation when his eighth- and ninth-grade students quickly turned to Google.

"What they would do is they would start Googling the question, 'How does a novel represent humanity?' " Heick says. "That was a real eye-opener to me."

Genetics researchers often discover certain snips and pieces of the human genome that are important for health and development, such as the genetic mutations that cause cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. And scientists noticed that genetic variants are more common in some races, which makes it seem like race is important in genetics research.

Cosmic Crisp, near Quincy, Wash., on Sept. 18, 2013
Courtesy of Good Fruit Grower/TJ Mullinax

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State University apple researcher Kate Evans about Cosmic Crisp, a new variety of apple she helped develop that will be exclusively grown in Washington state. 

We asked our listeners to weigh in on their favorite varieties, check out their varied responses below!

Engineering researchers at the University of Washington are working on ways to improve bus service in the Puget Sound area.
Flickr Photo/Dan Ox

On a rainy Seattle morning, Cameka Knock stands at a bus stop near Edmonds and Rainier in Columbia City.

She takes the bus to school, and she says that recently the one she was trying to catch passed her by because it was full.

"Squat! Squat! Squat! Higher! Faster!"

In the basement of the Duane Physics and Astrophysics building at the University of Colorado Boulder, a science demonstration is going on, but it looks more like a vaudeville act.

One by one, students balance precariously on a rotating platform. Then they are handed what looks like a spinning bicycle wheel, holding it by two handles that stick out from either side of what would be the hub of the wheel. When you flip the wheel over, like a pizza, your body starts rotating in the opposite direction.

Intel has a new report out today. It's not about semiconductors. It's about diversity: how Intel is doing when it comes to women and underrepresented minorities on its staff. The results are mixed — some strong and some, frankly, failures. Still the sheer amount of information is exceptional, and a direct challenge to other Silicon Valley giants who've chosen to hide their data.

Be Engineers About Diversity

Let's start with some numbers.

Google self driving car at the Computer History Museum.
Flickr Photo/Don DeBold (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o7T6qb

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington transportation expert Mark Hallenbeck about the future of automated, or self-driving, cars in Washington state. 

The Science Of Getting Kids Organized

Feb 2, 2016

If you've ever gotten a glimpse inside a high schooler's backpack or locker, you know organization doesn't always come naturally to teens. Being scatterbrained in school can make make it tough to stay focused and do well.

That was the case when Lilli Stordeur was about halfway through her freshman year of high school in Northampton, Mass. She felt totally overwhelmed.

"I was being tutored for the classes I was having trouble in," she says, "but I would be having a hard time organizing my binders, and notebooks and stuff, and knowing when to hand things in."

The history of science is full of happy accidents — most folks have heard that penicillin was discovered in 1928, when a few mold spores landed on some neglected petri dishes in a London lab. But sometimes serendipity's role is a bit less ... mainstream.

4 things you wanted to know about gene editing

Feb 1, 2016
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Creative Commons

Regulators in the UK today approved research on human embryos using CRISPR-Cas9, a controversial form of gene editing that has been exciting scientists and alarming bioethicists around the world.

Praying for rain? You'll get (slightly) less when the moon is very high, a new study finds.

Scientists at the University of Washington say the moon's position impacts the amount of rainfall on Earth.

"As far as I know, this is the first study to convincingly connect the tidal force of the moon with rainfall," researcher Tsubasa Kohyama says in a press release from the university.

As many know, parenting isn't an easy job. It can be hugely frustrating and even lonely trying to figure out what's best for your kid. Should you be a taskmaster or a best friend? Is there a middle ground? The pressures of full-time work and round-the-clock activities can make that question even more challenging to tackle.

One of the Northwest’s selling points is its cheap hydropower. That’s why in recent years data centers have sprouted along the Columbia River in both Washington and Oregon.

But in north central Washington, an emerging power-hungry industry is meeting with some resistance. It involves the making and managing of the virtual currency called bitcoin.

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