Technology

The free dating app Tinder has launched a paid subscription service called Tinder Plus.

The paid tier offers more functions than the free app, but it comes with a catch: users over age 30 are being charged twice as much as younger subscribers for the same service.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Tinder Plus with Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal.

RP's husband works in the Seattle area on an H-1B  visa. They lived together in Seattle for a year and a half before RP returned to work in India, due to visa restrictions.
KUOW Photo/Harsha Vadlamani

Washington is one of the top states that brings in high-skilled foreign workers, filling thousands of jobs every year.

This week, those workers got some long-awaited news from the federal government: A blanket rule that barred their spouses from working will soon be lifted.

The South Lake Union trolley.
Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Facebook's expansion into South Lake Union. 

computer high school education
Flickr Photo/Berkeley Lab (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Randy Dorn, the state superintendent of public instruction, about his proposal to make schools prove their students are getting a 21st century education.

We also hear from local high school students with their thoughts on this idea.

Chris Stolte at a Tableau Customer Conference in 2013.
From Tableau's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds speaks with Chris Stolte, chief development officer and co-founder of Tableau Software, a Seattle data visualization company whose goal is to make tools accessible to people who are not data nerds.

Every day, Americans use a lot of digital data, from checking Facebook to sending email. It all seems kind of intangible – stored and processed in the cloud. But this data actually exists on a server at one of the millions of data centers across the country.

Public Records Requests: How Big Is Too Big?

Feb 13, 2015

Ross Reynolds speaks with Toby Nixon, president of the Washington Coalition for Open Government, about the possible impact of a large public records request from local computer programmer Tim Cleman, who asked the email communication from every state agency. 

State Attorney General Bob Ferguson has told Clemans his request was too broad and state agencies do not have to act on it.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s strong growth means full buses and congested roads. The City of Seattle says maybe it should also mean more help for commuters. It’s holding a hackathon, bringing people together to build new tools that can help everyone get around.

The American corrections system been outsourcing some of its services – health care, food, telephone and money transfers are some examples of services that are helping for-profit prisons try to increase their profits by cutting costs.

In some cases, this adds an extra burden to inmates and their families by adding extra costs. Reporter Rowan Moore Gerety looks at a jail in Washington state that has brought in something new: paying for web video visits.

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Amazon's affect on brick and mortar retail.

Rhinos in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Seattle company is bioengineering rhino horns to cut down on poaching.`
Flickr Photo/Ian Turk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Pembient co-founder Matthew Markus. The local biotech startup is bioengineering rhino horn powder with the hopes of curbing poaching in Africa.

Today marks the return of a cult public television hit — Foyle's War. It previously appeared as part of PBS's big Sunday night Masterpiece lineup, but it won't be on TV tonight. For now, viewers will have to stream the show digitally. Acorn, the company that produces Foyle's War, has embarked on something of a Netflix strategy — raising the question of whether a niche pay portal can be a going concern.

It’s long been against the law to text and drive in Washington, but the rules would get much stricter under a proposal introduced Wednesday in the legislature.

Waze, the popular navigation app boasting more than 50 million users worldwide, has a new critic: police officers. Over the past few weeks, law enforcement officials have been urging the app and its owner, Google, to disable a feature that allows users to report when they've spotted a police officer, in real time, for all other Waze users to see.

Sergio Kopelev, a reserve sheriff in Orange County, Calif., is one of the law enforcement officials behind the push to remove Waze's police tracker. He says he first discovered the feature through his family.

Dragon, SpaceX's version of an astronaut taxi to the International Space Station. The company announced it would be opening up a new office in Seattle for 1,000 employees.  Boeing is also getting in the space technology game with a rival spacecraft.
Wikipedia Photo/NASA

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about the new frontiers of space technology and what that industry will mean for Seattle. 

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