Tech & Science

At most news organizations, journalists celebrate when they get a story in print, on air or online.

At Storyful, editors high-five when they knock a story down.

"We like to think about [Storyful] as the first social news agency," said Mark Little, the company's buoyant CEO. A former television news anchor and correspondent in his native Ireland, Little conceived the company in 2009 after watching the documentation of mounting protests in Iran posted to Flickr and YouTube.

Ross Reynolds talks to Christopher Soghoian, privacy expert for the ACLU, about a 2007 case where the FBI created a fake news link and sent it to a student they suspected was calling in bomb threats to Timberline High School. The link planted malware on the suspect's computer that the FBI was able to use to track and convict the teen.    

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated which news outlet the FBI used to bait the student suspected of making bomb threats. It was The Associated Press, not The Seattle Times as the guest noted in the radio interview.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Before Google Chat, before Facebook Messenger, there was AOL Instant Messenger. AIM still exists today, but it was hugely popular in the late 1990s. And for many young adults who grew up using AIM, those old screen names are a blast from the past they'd just as well forget.

A careful examination of frozen caribou poop has turned up two never-before-seen viruses.

The viruses are hundreds of years old: One of them probably infected plants the caribous ate. The other may have infected insects that buzzed around the animals.

The findings prove viruses can survive for surprisingly long periods of time in a cold environment, according to Eric Delwart, a researcher at Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco.

Mary Guiden / UW

Marcie Sillman speaks with graduate student Elle O'Brien, who recently represented the University of Washington's Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering at the National Science Foundation's Perfect Pitch Competition, about making science comprehensible to everyone.

Flickr Photo/Lisa Parker (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Parveen Bhatti, environmental epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, about how researchers determine causality.

As the ongoing, harassment-fueled controversy known as Gamergate rages into its second month with no sign of dying down, the Pew Research Center is out with new numbers on online harassment.

Litesprite

If you’re feeling depressed or stressed out, and therapy seems overwhelming, consider spending time with a fox.

One night last fall, I was walking through Chinatown in Washington, D.C., with my friend Terryn. We were not far from a dude who was in his mid-20s — slim, with neat, shoulder-length locks, skinny chinos, loafers and a leather briefcase slung across his torso — standing on the corner, his arm raised skyward. He was trying without luck to hail a cab.

Modern computer science is dominated by men. But it hasn't always been this way.

A lot of computing pioneers — the people who programmed the first digital computers — were women. And for decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged, even as the share of women in other technical and professional fields kept rising.

What happened?

Marcie Sillman talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about the latest tech news, including tablets, smartwatches and a new app on the market for ordering coffee. 

Mason jars have been riding a huge wave of popularity thanks to hipsters who embrace them for pickling projects, cake containers and all sorts of craft creations. Now, two engineers from Brooklyn are turning Mason jars into simple sound machines, to play your favorite FM radio station.

For those who follow the video game industry and its community, feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian is a familiar figure. Her video series "Tropes vs Women in Video Games" analyzes how women are represented in games past and present.

In the aftermath of disasters like earthquakes, fires and severe weather events, the rush to both alert and check on family and friends can crash telecommunications networks. During the freak 2011 Virginia earthquake, which rattled the nation's capital and damaged the Washington Monument, panicked phone calls quickly overloaded the phone network.

Facebook's newest tool, known as Safety Check, aims to allow people to quickly alert friends and family that they are safe after a natural disaster.

Marcie Sillman talks with Gary Jenkins, chief of police in Pullman, about why every police officer in the city has a body camera as documentation of what really happens when they interact with the public.

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