Tech & Science

Pages

Smart Phone Theft
10:52 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Tech Columnist Monica Guzman On Privacy And "Halfalogue"

A "halfalogue" is the one-sided part of the conversation you overhear when someon is on the phone, which can be unavoidable in public places.
Flickr Photo/Emiliano

 According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Americans with smart phones has just exceeded the halfway point. But more fancy phones could mean more cell phone theft. A recent Harris Poll showed that one out of every 10 mobile phone users has had their phone stolen at some point.

Seattle Times Tech columnist Monica Guzman had an article in the Sunday paper about smart phone theft specifically. She’s also a writer for GeekWire, and she appears regularly on The Conversation to talk about the latest tech news. This time she discusses cell phones and “halfalogue” with David Hyde.

Staging Science
9:00 am
Thu June 6, 2013

Pamela Reed's New Play, And Brian Greene On The Cosmos

Brian Greene's book "Icarus at the Edge of Time."

Art Of Our City
What happens when the liberal-minded daughter of conservative parents decides to write a tell-all memoir?  That’s the premise behind “Other Desert Cities,” a new play opening this week at ACT Theatre.  Actress Pamela Reed, best known for her role in the television show Parks and Recreation, plays the mother. We’ll ask her about the play and her acting career.

Understanding The Multiverse
If the universe we live in is just one of many other universes, how did we come to be and can we reconcile our own inferiority? Columbia University theoretical physicist Brian Greene has been exploring the world  of cosmology for nearly four decades. His research seeks to find answers to questions about time and space, the world we inhabit, and how we can better understand it. In addition to explaining the universe, Greene also penned the children’s book “Icarus at the Edge of Time.” Now "Icarus" is on the stage in a multimedia drama that features an original orchestral score by Philip Glass. We’ll talk with Greene about the staging of his scientific children’s book and about the latest secrets the universe has revealed.

Read more
Alternative Transportation
11:51 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Lyft, Uber And SideCar: Not Your Father’s Cabs

A Lyft car is always very recognizable by its bright pink mustache, but is that enought to compete with the traditional taxi service?
Flickr Photo/Liza Sperling

 Taxi cabs have a new breed of competitors. New companies like Lyft, Uber and Sidecar give smartphone users the ability to reserve a ride through an app on their phone. Some of the companies use private car owners as their main drivers. Will traditional taxis fall by the wayside? How are these new companies regulated? Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW’s transportation reporter, Derek Wang.  

Patent Battles
5:26 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Bellevue-Based Intellectual Ventures Now Targeting Financial Firms

Intellectual Ventures co-founder Nathan Myhrvold giving a TED Talk in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Red Maxwell

After numerous high-profile lawsuits against tech companies, a Bellevue-based patent company is now setting its sights on the financial industry.

On Tuesday, Intellectual Ventures announced it has filed lawsuits against two banks, JP Morgan Chase and Fifth Third Bank, for patent infringement. This is Intellectual Ventures’ second round of lawsuits targeting financial firms in the past week. On May 29, the company filed suit against First National Bank of Omaha and PNC.

Read more
Internet Privacy
12:04 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

How Are You Being Watched?

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is

You are under surveillance when you go online. The information gatherers include the government, advertising companies and brokers who sell your data. Christopher Soghoian, chief technologist for the national ACLU, explains that the constantly updating world of technology has  also changed the government's ability to spy Internet communications and mobile telephones.  

Read more
The Fine Print
12:05 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

New Documentary About Those Terms And Conditions You Signed

Everyone who uses a computer these days likely agrees to many "terms and conditions" agreements every year. But what are you really signing? Ross Reynolds interviews director Cullen Hoback, who takes a closer look at questions of privacy and consumer rights in a new documentary.    

Zeppelin Comeback
1:26 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

A New Kind Of Airship May Herald Return To The Age Of Dirigibles

The Aeroscraft.
Credit Aeros

The 1920s and 1930s are sometimes called "the age of the dirigible." Dirigibles were giant, steerable blimps and zeppelins, and they used to be a popular way to transport crowds of people from place to place. But then there was the fiery Hindenburg disaster. And during wars airplanes could easily shoot them down. After that airships were pretty much reduced to flying above football games and other kinds of surveillance.

Audio from a broadcast of the Hindenburg disaster in 1937

A Persistent Problem Overcome

Dirigibles never regained popularity because of a basic problem: they could only dock at special places where they could be tied down. Otherwise, they'd spring up into the air the moment you off loaded the cargo.

Now engineers have overcome that problem by simply compressing the helium upon landing. It's such a simple fix that its inventors are kicking themselves for not having thought of it sooner, and because dirigibles can lift extremely heavy loads much more efficiently than airplanes, the new airship's inventors believe we could see a new age of dirigibles.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, May 30:

Read more
Congressional Politics
10:00 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Surviving Mass Extinction And Gardening

Annalee Newitz’s new book is about surviving the next big disaster.

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers
Washington’s 5th Congressional District Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers joins us to talk about transportation priorities following the Skagit River Bridge collapse, federal budget talks, immigration reform and more.

Scatter, Adapt And Remember: How Humans Will Survive A Mass Extinction
Science writer Annalee Newitz’s new book is about hope. Hope that human kind will be able to survive the impending doom that threatens to send us into another mass extinction. Newitz outlines the current scientific discoveries that might help humans survive the next big disaster.

Greendays Gardening Panel
Our panel of gardening experts knows flowers, native plants and vegetables. They join us with garden guidance every Tuesday. Have a question? Send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

Read more
Bridge Collapse
9:00 am
Fri May 24, 2013

I-5 Bridge Collapse, Science News, And The Folklife Festival

Google Maps has already removed the bridge from their maps.
Google Maps

UPDATES: I-5 Skagit River Bridge
We'll get updates from Travis Phelps, WSDOT communications manager, and Larry Ehl, publisher of Transportation Issues Daily and former WSDOT federal relations manager.

Science News
Alan Boyle is science editor for NBC News Digital. From 3-D printed pizzas to the effects of climate change on tornados, he brings us the latest news in the world of science.

Northwest Folklife Festival
The 42nd annual Northwest Folklife Festival kicks off today. What are the can't-miss performances, exhibits and events? We'll get a preview from Folklife's head of programming Debbie Fant. We'll explore  the history of organized labor in Washington state with labor archivist Conor Casey. And we'll hear the tunes of Celtic fiddle music duo Brandon Vance and Mark Minkler.

Charging Station Delays
12:29 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Where Are The Electric Car Charging Stations?

Flickr Photo/Fifth World Art

 You can’t drive your electric car if you can’t plug in and recharge, and the build-out on electric car chargers is behind schedule. Ross Reynolds talks with WSDOT's Jeff Doyle about the gaps in the grid for electric car charging. 

Gaming
10:54 am
Tue May 21, 2013

What Does The New Xbox Mean For Microsoft’s Future?

The Xbox 360 conroller, pictured, will get some upgrades though the shape will stay largely the same for the new Xbox One.
Flickr Photo/mybroetchen

 Microsoft's new Xbox is being unveiled today at a live event in Redmond. With features like video streaming, this Xbox’s got more than games. But what does it mean for the future of the company? Ross Reynolds talks to Ian Sherr, reporter for The Wall Street Journal.

Internet Fluency
11:33 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Can Washington State Solve The Digital Literacy Divide?

Flickr Photo/espensorvik

 An estimated 1 in 6 Washingtonians don’t use the Internet. Ross Reynolds speaks with Zach Leverenz of Connect2Compete, which offers free digital literacy training. 

Seattle Start-ups
11:56 am
Fri May 10, 2013

GeekWire's John Cook: Seattle's Start-up Businesses Get A Boost

John Cook, Co-founder of Geekwire
Credit John Cook

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn announced a new start-up business initiative Thursday May 9  to support and boost technology business start-ups in Seattle. Technology reporter and GeekWire co-founder John Cook was part of the advisory group that aided the city’s process.

Read more
Social Issues
9:00 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The Tribes And Same-Sex Marriage, Science News, And Beverly Washburn

The Suquamish Tribe Recognized Same-Sex Marriage In 2011: Will Other Tribes?
In March, a Northern Michigan Indian tribe became the third in the US to recognize same-sex marriage. The Suquamish Tribal Council voted to recognize same-sex marriage in 2011. Other tribes have passed laws against. And the US Supreme Court is expected to issue a landmark marriage ruling this summer. Ron Whitener, executive director at Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, explains how the nation’s 563 recognized tribes are approaching the issue.

What’s New In Science News?  
Local virologists are tracking the latest flu in China, and the economics of studying science have led to some new ways to raise money for research. Sally James, Northwest science writer tells us what’s new in science news.

A Conversation With Former Child Star Beverly Washburn
Chances are you’ve seen Beverly Washburn perform, but you didn’t know her name. Have you seen Old Yeller? She was the little girl, Lisbeth. Washburn grew up performing opposite Hollywood greats like Lou Costello and Bing Crosby.   

Weekend Weather Forecast
How will the weather be for Mother's Day this Sunday? Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

International & Military News
9:00 am
Wed May 8, 2013

International Intervention In Syria, Sexual Assault In The Military, And Studying Hormone Levels

Lt. Col. Jeff Krusinski, chief of sexual assault prevention in the Air Force, was arrested and charged with sexual battery over the weekend.
Arlington County Police Department

How The World Is Responding To Syria
The US and Russia have agreed to convene an international conference to discuss ways of diplomatically settling the ongoing conflict in Syria. Dr. Steven Cook, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, discusses the implications of this conference and how the international community should be intervening in the crisis.
 
Sexual Assault In The Military  
The Pentagon has released a report on sexual assault in the military. It estimates that 26,000 military members were sexually assaulted in 2012, a large increase from the previous year. The report comes out just as Sen. Patty Murray and Sen. Kelly Ayotte argued for a bill that would work to reduce sexual assaults and help victims of the crime. Sen. Patty Murray and KUOW’s Patricia Murphy explain the new bill and the Pentagon's study.   

The Effects Of Blast Injuries On Hormone Levels In Veterans
A new study suggests that people with blast injuries are more likely to have irregular hormone levels. The hormone imbalance can lead to PTSD-like symptoms, depression and physical symptoms that raise the risk of heart attacks and strokes. University of Washington professor Charles Wilkinson studied the hormone levels in veterans who had suffered from concussions caused by blast injuries.

Basketball Diplomacy
NBA Hall of Famer Dennis Rodman is using his friendship with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un to ask for the release of Kenneth Bae, the Lynnwood man sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for "hostile acts" against the government. Rodman took to Twitter on Tuesday to ask Kim to “do me a solid and cut Kenneth Bae loose.” We talk with Seattle Times editorial writer Thanh Tan, who first urged Rodman via social media to approach his “lifelong friend” on Bae’s behalf.

Read more

Pages