Tech & Science

The decades-old ban on taking photographs inside the White House during public tours is being lifted today, first lady Michelle Obama announced on Instagram.

The White House, in a statement, said guests are welcome to take photos throughout the White House tour route and encouraged visitors to share their experiences using the hashtag #WhiteHouseTour.

What's permitted: Phones and compact still cameras with a lens no longer than 3 inches.

Would you let your smartphone share your location if it meant that one day you could come to a stranger's rescue?

Seattle's Real Change Newspaper Impresses With Pay App

Jun 25, 2015
Robert Surles sells Real Change, Seattle's homeless paper, at First Avenue and Yesler Way.
KUOW Photo/Ashley Stewart

Robert Surles is out on First Avenue and Yesler Way every day.

He’s selling Real Change, Seattle’s homeless newspaper.

When it comes to online video, the world is glued to YouTube. People watch billions of videos on it every day. And that huge share of online eyeballs is why other companies are trying to chip away at its dominance and lure some of its biggest stars away from the service.

The Washington National Guard -- joined by officers from Oregon and Idaho -- are preparing for a massive military relief effort.

Toddlers can throw their fair share of tantrums, especially when you don't yield to their will. But by age 3, it turns out, the little rug rats actually have a burgeoning sense of fairness and are inclined to right a wrong.

When they see someone being mistreated, children as young as 3 years old will intervene on behalf of others nearly as often as for themselves, a study published this month in Current Biology suggests. Just don't ask them to punish the perpetrator.

What's Trending On Instagram? A Battle With Twitter

Jun 23, 2015

Consider yourself warned: Instagram rolled out an update Tuesday, and the photo-sharing app may be about to eat up a lot more of your time.

More substantial than other recent makeovers touting new filters, this change will transform Instagram into a stream of real-time updates from around the country. Following in the footsteps of Twitter and Facebook, Instagram wants to be a source for your news.

New images of Ceres are the clearest ever taken, but NASA's scientists still haven't figured out the enigmatic dwarf planet. The agency's latest photos of Ceres show multiple bright spots — and a "pyramid-shaped peak towering over a relatively flat landscape."

That's according to an update posted by the space agency, saying that Ceres and its bright spots "continue to mystify."

Computer scientist and author Ramez Naam
Courtesy of Ramez Naam

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle computer scientist and science fiction writer Ramez Naam about the latest technology in human enhancement.  Naam is the author of the 2010 book, “More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement."

broadband router internet
Flickr Photo/Tom Page (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Christopher Mitchell about what steps Seattle might take to provide affordable broadband internet for all. Mitchell is the director of the Community Broadband Networks Initiative for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Michael Dalder/Reuters

Today, computer and information technology is advancing faster than at any time in human history. Tons of money is being invested into and earned from the industry. Technology giants like Google, Facebook and Apple are changing the world through technological innovations.

Chandra LeGue and David Calahan are facing a bit of a problem. They’re at the Sundown Trailhead near Southern Oregon's Applegate Valley. And they’re standing in the middle of a cloud.

Normally hiking in foggy weather isn’t a big deal. But on this day LeGue wanted it to be clear so the Google Trekker apparatus she’s carrying on her back can photograph the trail.

A crow dives on a researcher during a trial. Crows recognize people who have scared them or wronged them for years.
Courtesy Keith Brust

Professor John Marzluff’s phone is ringing more than usual, which means it’s crow dive-bombing season in Seattle.

“Every time I go out into my backyard there's a crow out there that's squawking at me and chasing me down,” said a man who called in about his experience to KUOW.

Cynthia Tee is the executive director of Ada Developers Academy, a coding school for women in Seattle.
Courtesy of Cynthia Tee

In a nondescript classroom in downtown Seattle, young women hunch over laptops, staring at lines of code.

These women, most of them in their 20s and 30s, are enrolled at Ada Developers Academy. This competitive program offers women free tuition and a stipend – all in the name of getting more women into the tech industry.

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