LGBTQ

In a 48-hour period this past October the number of states that allow same-sex marriage nearly doubled. As of this writing, thirty-five states allow same-sex couples to marry legally. Courts made that decision in twenty-four states. Legislatures made the call in another eight. And in three states, including Washington, the decision went to voters.

Marc Solomon has an extensive background in advocacy and public policy, but he wasn’t a natural pick to help lead the campaign to make same-sex marriage a reality. In his book, “Winning Marriage,” he tells the story of how a seemingly impossible goal — to win the freedom to marry for all Americans — came near reality in such a short period of time.

Becoming A Man (Finally) At 48

Dec 18, 2014
Over the last two years, Kim has transitioned into a male body. He chronicled his transition in YouTube vlogs. This screen grab is from Aug. 4, 2014.
Kim Dogluv on YouTube

Nov. 8, 2012: Female To Male

I’m Kim, and I’m beginning my transition. Right now I’m pre-everything.

I’m 48 years old. I have been wanting to do this for 27 years. I put it off because I didn’t want to tell my family and parents. And also, not to name any names, but various girls I’ve known, some lesbians close to me, kind of put it out there that it’s not necessary. And I went with that instead of my gut feeling.

Credit Matthew Streib

There’s a bright pink sign that hangs on the front door of Pony, a gay bar on Capitol Hill:

“Attention: This is a gay bar. A very gay bar. If you aren't queer (or a respectful ally), get lost. This isn't a zoo and we're not your pets.”

Pony manager Marcus Wilson made that sign in response to Capitol Hill’s changing demographics – from gay to increasingly straight.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

UPDATE: 12/11/2014

In August, Uganda struck down a law which punished homosexuality with life in prison – but only on a technicality. Talcott Broadhead, who helps run the Friends New Underground Railroad that ferries LGBT people out of the country, said the celebration that followed was premature.

She said many were put into direct threat, beaten or killed after the repeal of the law. Some areas of the country are even seeing a movement of vigilante justice. “So the fear was no longer imprisonment so much as it was mob justice,” Broadhead said, returning to KUOW’s The Record with an update.

Flickr Photo/Serena Epstein (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with senior Brookings Institution fellow, Jonathan Rauch, about how the gay rights movement compares to other social movements in the past.

Over the weekend, the story of a transgender woman in Idaho whose family had her buried as a man lit up social media.

Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Leo Egashira, representative for Dignity Seattle, which ministers to LGBT Catholics, about the Vatican's gay-positive statements coming from an ongoing synod of cardinals.

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET

As we reported earlier, a synod of Catholic bishops meeting at the Vatican has released an interim document that signals the likelihood of a dramatic overhaul in the church's stance on gays and lesbians, as well as its view on divorced members.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Hate crimes are up in Seattle despite the increasing efforts of Seattle Police to fight them.

Capitol Hill and downtown Seattle are hotspots for crime that involves hatred of targeted groups of people, according to Seattle Police.

The fate of Idaho's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage is in the hands of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. 

Intiman Theatre

Tony Kushner was an aspiring playwright with only a single play produced when the artistic leaders of San Francisco's Eureka Theatre asked if he would write something for them.

Via Crosscut

Seattle writer Knute Berger was combing through old articles when he spotted an unusual character: “A woman, dressed as a man, riding a bike recklessly.”

Marcie Sillman talks with former teacher Jim Gaylord, who was fired from Tacoma's Wilson High School in 1972 for being gay. The school district will offer a formal apology this Sunday.

Four Florida insurers allegedly discriminate against people with HIV/AIDS by structuring their prescription drug benefits so that patients are discouraged from enrolling, according to a complaint filed by health advocacy groups.

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