KUOW's Storywallahs | KUOW News and Information

KUOW's Storywallahs

Storywallahs lets anyone sign up for a chance to tell a five-minute story that relates to that event's theme. Or just come listen to great stories told by folks from the Indian and South Asian community. 

Madhura Nirkhe at ACT Theatre
KUOW Photo/Sonya Harris

The Storywallahs series provides a stage for Puget Sound residents with roots in India and South Asia to tell stories. This time around the theme concerned the question of belonging. In the era of "making America great again," these stories help illuminate what it means to be great in the first place. 

Storywallahs: Belonging

Apr 4, 2017

Storywallahs: An Evening of Storytelling
Sunday, April 23
ACT Theatre, 700 Union Street, Seattle WA 98101
6:30 p.m. doors, 7:00 p.m. show
$12

Buy tickets here

This show’s theme: Belonging

KUOW Photo: Lisa Wang

Last year KUOW teamed up with Seattle Asian Art Museum, Pratidhwani, South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) and Tasveer to launch the Storywallahs series. Theses events provide a stage for storytelling on a theme.

This time around the stories concern first days: What was it like to arrive in the United States for the first time? This gathering of reflections will surprise and inspire you.

KUOW Storywallahs: First Day

Oct 25, 2016
Taken at the second Storywallahs event; the theme was Coming Home.
KUOW Photos/Bond Huberman

It’s time for another Storywallahs!

This show’s theme:  First Day

KUOW is teaming up once again with Seattle Asian Art Museum, Pratidhwani, South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) and Tasveer. This political year has been a whirlwind of discussion — good and bad — around the topic of immigration and newcomers.

Are you Indian/South Asian with a good story about your first day in Seattle or the United States? What happened? Come tell your 5 minute story in front of a fun and friendly crowd!

Taken at the second Storywallahs event; the theme was Coming Home.
KUOW Photos/Bond Huberman

The 24-year-old man didn’t have a home.

So he came up with a bold plan: Go to the nicest neighborhood in Grand Rapids, Michigan, knock on the doors of 10 mansions and ask if he could move in.

KUOW Storywallahs: Coming Home

Oct 19, 2015
Dinesh Korde

Storywallahs: An Evening Of Storytelling
Sunday, November 22, 2015
Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 East Prospect St. (Map)
6:00 p.m. doors/6:30 p.m. show
Buy tickets

This show’s theme:  Coming Home

Aneesh Sheth speaks at KUOW's Storywallahs event in early May at the Kirkland Performing Arts Center.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The South Asian community in the United States has roots in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The community represents one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the country. From 2000 to 2010 their population grew by 81 percent nationally, in Seattle the increase was 173 percent.

Share Your Story At Storywallahs

Mar 26, 2015

*Storywallahs, n. “Hinglish” word for “storyteller.”

Pujpha Bania, 33, and her daughter Manisha, 8, are migrant workers from Odisha state in northeast India. They travelled several days by train to work at a brick kiln near Hyderabad, India.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – The road to Hyderabad winds through a landscape of ancient boulders – some three or four stories high. The earth-colored stones fill wide gaps between the sleek, high-rise towers that push the city’s skyline and suburbs to new limits.

Students sit in a computer science class taught by professor Chakravarthy Bhagavati at the University of Hyderabad.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – If you ask engineering students in India about their career paths, the conversation often leads to America and if they’d like to go there.

“Obviously,” is a typical response.

Apurva Koti, 16, plays tabla drums in his living room in Hyderabad, India.  Apurva also plays electric guitar. Apurva and his family moved to India from Redmond, Washington in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – Decades ago, when immigrants moved to Seattle from India, they asked each other: “Why would you ever leave the U.S.?”

But now, a growing number of Indians are doing just that. And they’re doing it largely so the families they start here can bond with their homeland.

REDMOND, WASHINGTON -- Two young Indian co-workers face off across the table at a café on Microsoft’s main campus. The challenge? Who can eat the most panipuri: bite-sized Indian street food made up of a fried shell stuffed with spicy potatoes.

Mahadevan Iyer and a friend sit outside his apartment at a senior living community near Chennai, India.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

BANGALORE, INDIA – Three generations live under the same roof in this bustling home: two rambunctious kids, their weary parents and an 80-year-old grandfather.

The grandfather, Raj Krishnamurthy, is an eager host, and keeps offering me Indian snacks as we talk on the couch. He serves up a homemade yogurt drink specially made today for a Hindu holiday. Then he leans closer, as if to tell a secret.

The RajGuru family was one of the first Indian families to move to Redmond in 1969. Matriarch Madhavi Rajguru's saris would often inspire curiosity.
Courtesy of Devki Rajguru

REDMOND, WASHINGTON – Long before Microsoft set up its headquarters here, and before the 520 highway extended this far, the RajGuru family moved to this Seattle suburb they knew almost nothing about. The year was 1969.

Pages