How We Live

Sahra Farah and volunteers at the Somali Community Center hope development around Rainier Beach station will bring jobs to the neighborhood, where she says young people struggle to find employment.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington state hopes new growth will spring up in urban villages clustered around mass transit. The goal is to avoid further congestion.

Yet in Seattle’s Rainier Valley, where light rail has been running for over five years, development has been slow to come. 

RadioActive's Guide To Making Friends In New Places

1 hour ago
Kendra Hanna recruiting members for the Kendra Needs Friends Club at the University of Washington
KUOW Photo/Iman Mohamed

February is known as a month to focus on love and romance, but in this month's podcast, we focus on the people you lean on year round: your friends! We hear what friendship means to preschoolers and retired people and a timeless story of teenage adventure. 

Plus, you don't want to miss our story about one girl's unusual attempt to make friends in a new place.

RadioActive is KUOW's program for high school students. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

Where Blind Baseball Players Play To Win

10 hours ago
Coach Kevin Daniel and captain Dino Sanchez of the Seattle South King Sluggers.
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When Kevin Daniel moved to Seattle, he assumed the city would have something he was leaving behind in Spokane: a blind baseball team.

That wasn’t the case. So in 2013 Daniel formed the Seattle South King Sluggers after asking one very important question: If he started a team, could they win?

Ordinance Limits Rent On Seattle Micro-Housing Units

Feb 24, 2015
Sara Bernard / KUOW

The Seattle City Council unanimously approved an ordinance on Monday that would limit the rent on some micro-housing units. These “efficiency” apartments are smaller than traditional studios.

This is an adjustment to a program that gives developers a tax break for offering some units to low-income renters. But some developers say this is going too far.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marty Hartman about the challenges faced by homeless students in Washington state. Hartman is executive director of Mary's Place, a Seattle nonprofit that provides shelter and resources for homeless women and children.

Writer Elisa Albert believes that the so-called "Mommy Wars" have gone on long enough — they are both a distraction and a cop-out, she says. "It's a way of avoiding the actual issues, which is: Women don't have enough support for any of the choices that we make," Albert tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "We are pitted against each other and ultimately, then, are pitted against ourselves. And everybody is unhappy, and everybody feels judged. It doesn't have to be this way."

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Sara Lerner about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's new parental leave program for city workers.

Sillman also interviews Brigid Schulte, reporter for the Washington Post and author of the book, "Overwhelmed: Work Love And Play When No One Has The Time," about how the US compares to the rest of the world when it comes to family leave policies.

Bluebird skies, warming temperatures, and snow-free terrain might have you itching to hike your favorite trail.

But be prepared to encounter a "closed trail" sign. Several Northwest hiking routes are off-limits to humans this time of year. That's because the region’s migrant mule deer still need a few months to themselves.

“Giving them a little bit of space and a little consideration can be helpful to ensure that we have healthy deer populations,” said David Volsen, a district wildlife biologist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

A Closer Look At The Non-Browning Apple

Feb 20, 2015

You may have heard the U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved a genetically-engineered apple that apparently does not turn brown.

There’s been a lot of media coverage, including some negative feedback about the apples, which will be marketed as Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden.

As a high school student, Lani Guinier wrote a letter to the College Board over a math question on the SAT that she found problematic.

When she got to Harvard's Radcliffe College, her roommate announced that she was worried about something: With her perfect SAT score she'd have trouble finding someone to marry.

In the 1960s in California, the state wanted children to be adopted into two-parent homes. But officials were having trouble placing hundreds of children, especially older boys.

Bill Jones, a gay man living in San Francisco, had always wanted to be a father. He decided to apply.

"They were looking for somebody with family in the area and I had family in the area," Jones told his friend Stu Maddux, on a recent visit to StoryCorps. "They were looking for somebody that had some contact with children. I had been a schoolteacher for six years."

The sun rose and then quickly set again on a proposal by some state legislators to abolish daylight saving time in Washington state.

Hike, outdoor, A trail marker designating the Pacific Crest Trail.
Flickr Photo/Dan Hurt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jack Haskel, Pacific Crest Trail Association's Trail Information Specialist, about the impact that the book and recent movie, "Wild," is having on the PCT.

Vandalism at Bothell Hindu Temple and Cultural Center.
Courtesy of HTCC/Nitya Niranjan

Leaders of a Hindu temple in Bothell have fast-tracked a plan to add some extra security cameras. This comes after the temple was tagged with racist graffiti over the weekend. The incident has gotten some international media attention and is still under investigation.  

Many East Asian cultures use zodiac animals to symbolize each New Year and predict a person's fortunes. But which animal represents 2015 is up for debate.

You may have seen goat, sheep or ram as the English translation for this year's animal according to the Chinese zodiac — yang, in Mandarin. All of them are correct, says Lala Zuo, a Chinese language and culture professor at the U.S. Naval Academy in Maryland.

"I don't think there's a wrong translation," she says. "I think there are various ways of translation. It really depends on the context."

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