How We Live | KUOW News and Information

How We Live

The Obama administration is rushing to tie up loose ends before packing up — protecting the rusty patched bumblebee, ending the Cuba "wet foot, dry foot" immigration policy, settling a fraud case over

Jacob Lawrence in the Studio, 1983
Photo/Mary Randlett, courtesy UW Special Collections

I first met the artist Jacob Lawrence in his attic. That was more than 30 years ago, on a gray day, not so unusual for Seattle. 


Benjamin Hunter at Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Courtesy of Seattle Colleges

For his 1967 speech “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence,” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote:

"We are now faced with the fact, my friends, that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time.”

Teatro Zinzanni, on lower Queen Anne in Seattle
KUOW photo, Marcie Sillman

Seattle’s long-running cabaret/dinner theater Teatro Zinzanni has been drawing crowds to its elegant vintage tent on lower Queen Anne since 2007.

The tent sits on land just north of Seattle Center; the land was given to Seattle Opera as potential funding source for a new home adjacent to Marion Oliver McCaw Hall.

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about AEG's pitch to renovate KeyArena, which would potentially lay the groundwork for a new Sonics home. Baker discusses why the company's plans may be more realistic than Chris Hansen's Sodo arena, how traffic will be affected and why it's important to save KeyArena from demolition. 

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

 Bill Radke talks with Seattle-based author Lindy West about why she still believes Twitter can be a great democratizing force, even while she's decided not to be part of the social media platform anymore.

In 1889, Bethlehem Steel brought engineer Frederick Taylor on board in an attempt to streamline its vast operation.

Taylor had recently invented a theory of "time management" in which the same principles used to optimize machines was applied to people. Taylor stalked the floors of the Bethlehem plant armed with a stopwatch and a clipboard noting the time it took for workers to complete tasks, like loading iron bars onto waiting railcars. Taylor's eventual recommendation to the company's executives were simple: The workers should be made to do more in less time.

Many of us feel irked when we hear people speaking "incorrectly." Whether it's using "like" a few too many times, or the word "literally" to mean "figuratively," we have a sense that there is a correct way to speak, and that that isn't it. While new speech patterns might be irritating, the linguist John McWhorter says they can't possibly be wrong. His new book is Words on the Move: Why English Won't and Can't Sit Still (Like Literally).

Jason Hummel photographs a skier making his way down Mt. Adams
Courtesy of Jason Hummel

Jason Hummel has gone skiing nearly every month for twenty years. And he's been a nature and adventure photographer for eight years. 

In that time, he's seen climate change dramatically remake the landscape in the Northwest.

Housing construction in Marysville.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

In Cora Milholland's lifetime, Marysville has grown from under 2,000 residents to over 60,000.

Since the time he arrived in the 1990s, Loren Cook says the population has tripled.

Six new developments have sprung up on all sides of  Nichole Cleland since 2004, when she moved to a new development in Marysville. 

"Difficult woman" is a loaded term, but writer Roxane Gay isn't afraid of taking on ideas with baggage. (A few years ago, she wrote a book of essays called Bad Feminist.) Her new short story collection, Difficult Women, explores women's lives and issues of race, class and sex.

If you're looking for a diet plan that suits your lifestyle, a new list of rankings from U.S. News & World Report has you covered.

Alan Sugiyama in an interview on CityStream in 2016. He dedicated his life and career to social justice. He died January 2, 2017.
City of Seattle

Local civil rights leader Alan Sugiyama died Monday at the age of 67 after a two-year battle with cancer.

He emerged as a leader in the Asian-American rights movement at a young age, co-founding the Oriental Student Union at Seattle Central Community College.

FLICKR PHOTO/Dru! (CC by NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/BMoK7R

Bill Radke speaks with The Stranger columnist David Schmader about the idea that we should blame 2016 as a year for the deaths of many musicians and celebrities such as Prince, David Bowie, George Michael and Carrie Fisher. Schmader says we shouldn't let the trend become the focus of our mourning, we should focus on the individual. 

Suzanne Adams during her visit to KUOW.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Bill Radke speaks with Suzanne Adams about how her experiences as a former police chief and a transgender woman have helped her train Seattle Police Department officers on how to properly interact with the trans community.  

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