How We Live

At high schools and universities across the Inland Northwest, student athletes have been forced to practice indoors due to dense wildfire smoke.

Penguin Random House

It's the time of year when many of us look to relax with a good book in a pleasant spot, away from the usual chatter of life, a time when Town Hall takes a month off for goodness sake, for a well-earned break and to avoid overheating its guests. It's usually not a time we're thinking about death.

Tomatoes at Queen Anne Farmers Market.
Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Queen Anne Farmers Market to talk with cook, author and chef Becky Selengut about what's fresh for your table. Hear a simple recipe for using delicious tomatoes. Selengut's books include Good Fish and Shroom: Mind-Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms.

Courtesy of Letibee

When 24-year-old Koki Hayashi first came out to his mom, he was a junior in college.

"I just kind of said it quickly, 'Hey, I’m gay,'" he recalls.

“Stop it. That’s disgusting,” she said, according to Hayashi. That really hurt.

Japan — unlike the US — doesn't have a Puritan history that says homosexuality is some kind of cardinal sin. And for years it wasn't uncommon to see a cross-dresser on TV giving fashion advice or a Japanese cartoon with gay characters.

Sen. Bernie Sanders drew big crowds again this weekend, but they may not be the right kind of crowd if he hopes to win South Carolina's primary. The Independent senator from Vermont is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, and he'll need black voters to win in the early-voting state.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

More details are emerging about the incident in which three Americans, including two U.S. servicemen traveling in civilian clothes, overpowered, tackled and subdued a Kalashnikov-wielding gunman aboard a high-speed train in Belgium.

One of those who helped take down the assailant was slashed multiple times with a box cutter in the scuffle and remains hospitalized with non-life threatening wounds, according to The Associated Press.

Jimmy Carter told a press conference he called on the morning of the day he would have the first radiation treatment on the cancer in his brain, "I'd like for the last guinea worm to die before I do."

Mr. Carter was frank, funny and graceful speaking this week about his health, and his faith. But his remark about the guinea worm may have puzzled a few people.

Ross Reynolds interviews Larry Gossett and Bob Santos, two members of Seattle’s "Gang of Four." In the social turmoil of the 1960s and 70s, four Seattle political activists came of age: Roberto Maestas from the Latino community, Native American activist Bernie Whitebear , Bob Santos of the Asian community, and African American leader Larry Gossett.

Santos is the co-author of “Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship."

File photo of softball and mitt
Flickr Photo/Hillarie (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Why should the rest of us care whether Amazon employees love or hate their jobs? How can we make wildfires less destructive? What are we teaching our kids when we tell them to throw a little league game to win a tournament?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with New York Times writer David Streitfeld, Geekwire's Todd Bishop, former GOP leader Bill Finkbeiner, state Senator Michael Baumgartner, former firefighter Kyle Dickman and journalist Erica C. Barnett.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Alex Hymer, co-owner of Sweet River Bakery in Pateros, Washington. The bakery is about an hour south of Winthrop and Twisp, and has been serving up caffeine and internet access to wildfire evacuees from the two towns.

Lovincer from Uganda works managing her fresh banana business to support her family.
Facebook Photo/Kiva

Jessica Jackley was a liberal arts major who stumbled her way into the Stanford MBA program.

Philosophy and business came together for her in 2005 when she helped start Kiva, the world’s first person- to-person microlending website. Kiva facilitates lending to poor and underserved entrepreneurs and students in 83 countries.

Kids play on a closed street in the Central District. Water was the theme here.
KUOW Photo/Paul Kiefer

In old movies and photographs, you sometimes see kids playing in the street, even in big cities. Today, cars and bikes have taken over the streets.

But in Seattle, that old idea of street play is making a comeback.

They’re called Play Streets, a program through the Seattle Department of Transportation. The city started testing the idea last year. The premise: Shut down a neighborhood street for a few hours so kids can play. It’s free – all you have to do is fill out a sheet of paper and send it to the city.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Many people thought it was Vern Fonk they were seeing in the outrageous commercial for Vern Fonk insurance. But actually it was a man named Rob Thielke.

Thielke rose from officer manager to becoming  president of the company and the creator and actor in those zany commercials. 

Thielke died Sunday from cancer after a long illness at the age 50. But he’ll  live on in those memorably creative commercials.

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. In recent years, we've been transfixed by Glass Gem Corn and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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