How We Live

Flickr Photo/Japanexperterna.se (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcom talks with Laura Caster, manager of Snohomish county's 911, about their new text to 911 service and why it makes sense.

Eggs
Flickr Photo/A.Davey (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Ross Reynolds meets up with Cynthia Lair, an assistant professor at Bastyr University and director of their culinary arts program, to find out what’s fresh at the University District Farmers Market. Lair explains why eggs are particularly great right now.

We're not that emerald of a city anymore with the recent drought conditions.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Youngstrom (CC BY NC 2.0)

Extremely dry weather and rising use have got the Puget Sound region’s cities thinking seriously about a water shortage later this year.

Seattle, Tacoma and Everett said Monday that they're activating the first stage of water shortage response plans.

If you looked at the children at the edge of Conrad Cooper's pool, you'd think you were watching an ad for something. Jell-O, maybe. Or a breakfast cereal kids like. They're that cute.

They're lined up on the steps in the shallow end, 10 little ones, ranging from age 2 to 5. The boys are in board trunks, many wearing rash-guard shirts like the weekend surfers they might become years from now. The girls wear bright one-piece suits and two-pieces that show their childish potbellies.

Eagle Scout Liam Easton-Calabria from Ballard, Seattle: 'it just made me pretty upset to learn that I wouldn’t be able to do what my dad was doing.'
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Boy Scouts and their families in the Seattle area are celebrating this week’s national decision to allow gay scout leaders. But not all local troops will be implementing the changes. 

John Syverson, facilities manager for the Frye Hotel downtown, doesn't sugar coat the problems around his buildings.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The Frye Hotel in downtown Seattle evokes a certain nostalgia. Two towering brick buildings are connected by an awning where one imagines a white-gloved doorman standing.

But outside, facilities manager John Syverson doesn’t hide the less charming problems with the building.

KUOW Photo/Paul Kiefer

RadioActive’s Julia Furukawa and Paul Kiefer delve into the often overlooked reality of hunger in contemporary America. Through a brief history lesson, a talk with University of Washington School of Public Health professor Donna Johnson and a small experiment, these journalists build a basic understanding of the origins and issues of modern food insecurity. 

RadioActive is KUOW's program for youth age 16-20ish. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

When undocumented immigrants move through government-run detention centers in the U.S., it can take months before they find out if they'll be deported or allowed to stay in the country.

During this long wait, many become frustrated. And some turn to religion.

It's the job of the in-house chaplain to help connect detainees to religious services.

Keith Henderson, chaplain at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., says, "I love it. I love the job," partly, he says, because he likes challenges.

Grapes on the vineyards of Cave B Winery in Quincy, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Samantha Levang (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dick Boushey, a grower and vineyard manager in the Red Mountain area, about the impact of heat on Washington's $1 billion wine industry. 

Interstate 90 cuts through the heart of the Mountains to Sound greenway.
Courtesy of Greenway Trust

Kim Malcom talks with Mountains to Sound Greenway executive director Jon Hoekstra about the Greenway Trust and protecting the environment amid booming growth. 

The crowd warms up before a live broadcast Friday of KUOW's Week in Review at the Leif Erikson Lodge in Ballard.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ballard residents and locals from surrounding areas (and two from Clinton, Whidbey Island) crowded into the Leif Erikson Lodge in the heart of the neighborhood for KUOW's Week in Review summer tour stop. 

Based on their reaction to the panel's discussion, most share concerns of the new normal in Ballard: development, and the aches that come with it, like transportation, parking and housing affordability. 

We grabbed three from the audience to help us understand a little more about the flavor and trials of the historically "Norswegian" part of Seattle. 

Boats crowd Lake Washington during a past Seafair weekend.
Flickr Photo/missyleone (CC BY 2.0)

David Hyde speaks with Beth Ebel, a professor of pediatrics and a doctor with the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, about the culture around drinking and boating and how we can change it. 

A view of Lake Union from Seattle Harbor Patrol 2. Drownings often occur on sunny days and because of drunk boating.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Seattle Police Officer Mark Mulvanny remembers a time about 10 years ago when he spotted a drunk boater.

He was patrolling Lake Union when he saw the boat speeding northbound, heading straight for him.

Flowers are piled outside the International District Emergency Center on Thursday in tribute to Donald Chin, who was shot to death earlier in the day.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Some called Donald Chin the face of Seattle's Chinatown. Others called him its protector.

Chin, 59, was fatally shot early Thursday morning in the neighborhood that was the focus of his life's work.

The biggest crowd to ever watch a National Women's Soccer League match filled Providence Park in downtown Portland  Wednesday evening. More than 21,000 fans saw the Seattle Reign defeat the home team Portland Thorns 1-0.

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