How We Live

Ten years ago, a gunman barricaded himself inside a one-room Amish schoolhouse near Lancaster, Pa. Then he opened fire.

Charles "Charlie" Roberts killed five children and injured five others before killing himself.

The Amish community responded in a way that many found surprising: They forgave the shooter. And, in the years since, they have grown close to his family.

"I will never face my Amish neighbors again"

The Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that might decide whether the government can deny Washington's NFL team a trademark because it has deemed the team name is offensive.

The court granted certiorari on Lee V. Tam. If you remember, The Slants, an Asian-American rock band, sued the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because it refused to trademark their name saying it proved offensive.

Bill Radke speaks with local independent podcast producer Marlo Mack about how she came to accept that the child she thought was her son was actually her daughter. Mack, who goes by a pseudonym to protect her child, has joined with KUOW to collaborate on a new season of How To Be A Girl, a podcast about raising a transgender daughter. 

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Check out this bhangra by the beach, Nova Scotia style

Sep 28, 2016
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Bhangra is a style of both music and dance that's popular in the Punjab region of India.

But a new bhangra video that went viral has a distinctly different backdrop: Peggy's Cove, in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. 

Alaina Caldwell, Gerald Elliott, Jodi White, Alissa Wehrman, Eula Scott Bynoe, Matthew Brasco and Jasmine Jackson.
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

It’s all over the news and social media: A person of color is shot and killed by police, there’s a protest, and an investigation, then another shooting. What does this seemingly endless cycle say about racism in America? 

This summer, Speakers Forum recorded an event called “Black Lives in America: Healing and Moving Forward.” It was hosted by the crew at HellaBlackHellaSeattle, a podcast focused on creating community for people of color in Seattle. 

We've all been there — having fun relaxing with friends and family, when someone says something a little racially off. Sometimes it's subtle, like the friend who calls Thai food "exotic." Other times it's more overt, like that in-law who's always going on about "the illegals."

In any case, it can be hard to know how to respond. Even the most level-headed among us have faltered trying to navigate the fraught world of racial awkwardness.

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

For the millions of Spanish-speaking Americans who caught the presidential debate on Univision Monday night, there was a familiar voice: Vicente de la Vega.

De la Vega was the simultaneous interpreter for Donald Trump during the debate broadcast — a role he's played at various times during the campaign. He's also the president and CEO of Precision Translating Services.

For decades, artifacts of life and work from the Manhattan Project and Cold War era at Hanford have been locked away. Now, these historical items are being trucked off the southeast Washington nuclear site and curated at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Courtesy of Michelle Kaufman

Bill Radke speaks with writer and humorist Dave Barry about what it's like to live in a state that's relevant during presidential elections. While Hillary Clinton will almost certainly get Washington's electoral votes, Florida, per usual, is up for grabs. 

Barry, whose new book is "Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland," tells Radke about the origins of Florida's wacky reputation (the 2000 election), what he thinks of Seattle and what we can all learn this election season from Florida's legendary electoral foibles. 

Emily Fox talks with journalist Maureen O'Hagan about the mystery surrounding the true identity of a deceased Texas woman who went by the name Lori Ruff. She stole the identity of a Washington girl who died in a house fire in the 1970s. Last week, it was revealed that Ruff was born Kimberly McLean, who ran away from her Pennsylvania home when she was 18.

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?

Courtesy of Seattle University/Yosef Chaim Kalinko

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is known for his record-setting feats in the NBA and as a best-selling author and cultural critic. His new book is “Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality beyond Black and White.”

He spoke with journalist Art Thiel on September 8 at Seattle University. Jennie Cecil Moore recorded their talk.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sean Liming, a Capitol Hill resident who is attending the neighborhood's first ever renters summit. At the summit, he'll be calling for renters in Capitol Hill, who make up 80 percent of the neighborhood's residents, to unite to create policy ideas to combat skyrocketing rents. 

Week 2 of the NFL season is now complete, and what once would have been unimaginable is now becoming commonplace.

I'm talking about protests — player protests — visible, controversial, much-talked-about displays during the playing of the national anthem, before NFL games, in stadiums, around the country.

These protests began nearly a month ago when San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick chose to sit rather than stand while The Star-Spangled Banner was being played during a preseason game.

3,000-Year-Old Cooking Fail Found At A Danish Dig Site

Sep 21, 2016

Denmark currently holds the title of world's happiest country. But we could imagine at least one Norseman back in time who, after a failed cooking attempt, probably felt little of the famed Danish hygge.

In a hilly wetland north of Silkeborg, archaeologists have unearthed a wholly intact Bronze Age clay pot containing a cheesy and charred residue burned to its inside.

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