How We Live

Ross Reynolds talks with Liahann Bannerman, director of the volunteer center at United Way of King County, about where people can volunteer this Thanksgiving, and how volunteers dry up after the holidays.

Flickr Photo/Roberta Schonborg

Marcie Sillman speaks with Joshua Plotnik, founder and CEO of Think Elephants International, about the debate over where to send Bamboo and Chai, Woodland Park Zoo's remaining two Asian elephants. The zoo announced Wednesday that they've decided to phase out their elephant program. 

Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo expels its elephants – where should they go? Did President Obama overreach on immigration? Could a “millionaire's tax” fly in Seattle? Why must Metro bus drivers wear Depends? Do Seahawks players have to talk to reporters if they have nothing to say?

Bill Radke reviews the week's news questions with panelists Sherman Alexie, Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Luke Burbank. Plus, DecodeDC host Andrea Seabrook tells you how executive privilege works!

The Cinerama, a property managed by Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate, has reopened after an extensive, top-of-the-line renovation. Marcie Sillman speaks with Jennifer Bean, director of the cinema and media studies program at the University of Washington, about the history of Seattle's Cinerama, and the ways that movie theaters lure moviegoers into their seats.

Experts say there are at least three tests to give a Christmas tree before it gets strapped it to a car and dragged home so it doesn’t go “Charlie Brown” before Christmas Day.

When an assisted living home in California shut down last fall, many of its residents were left behind, with nowhere to go.

The staff at the Valley Springs Manor left when they stopped getting paid — except for cook Maurice Rowland and Miguel Alvarez, the janitor.

"There was about 16 residents left behind, and we had a conversation in the kitchen, 'What are we going to do?' " Rowland says.

"If we left, they wouldn't have nobody," the 34-year-old Alvarez says.

Their roles quickly transformed for the elderly residents, who needed round-the-clock care.

Are you caught in an egocentric predicament? You’ll be asked to consider such a question in this episode of Speakers Forum.

Dr. Cornel West speaks forcefully on a wide range of subjects including the struggle for truth and justice; political discourse and dysfunction; African American religious, cultural and music history; and the impact of the events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Washington State Auctions Picasso Sketchbook

Nov 20, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with Chiyo Ishikawa, deputy director for art and curator of European painting and sculpture at the Seattle Art Museum, about the state revenue department's auctioning of a sketchbook dated 1912 that contains 27 drawings thought to be the work of Pablo Picasso. 

Rents are rising sharply in Seattle, and the city has launched another effort to tackle the shortage of affordable housing.

At an Ethiopian community center in the Rainier Valley, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's new affordable housing committee tried Wednesday night to take the pulse of a community hit hard by housing costs.

The 28-member committee's first open house began slowly as a consultant showed the multicultural audience how to use handheld electronic clickers to take part in an instant survey.

Seattle’s elephants are leaving town to join another herd.

The Woodland Park Zoo announced on Wednesday that it will close its elephant exhibit and send its only two elephants, Chai and Bamboo, to another zoo.

The city budget for the next two years is coming together and it looks like a downtown facility for the homeless will get enough money to keep its doors open from early morning to late at night. 

It’s called the Urban Rest Stop and it’s a place where the people without a home can take showers, do their laundry and use the restroom (without having to buy a cup of coffee first). 

Jairo Gomez is 17 years old and lives in a tiny apartment in New York City with eight other family members. He has grown up in poverty, like one-third of all kids in the city. With WNYC's program Radio Rookies, Gomez tells the story of how poverty has held him back, and how he's trying to overcome it.

There are nine of us in my family, and we live in a one-bedroom apartment. I share a bunk bed with my sister Judy.

One Gamer's Take On 'Gamergate'

Nov 19, 2014

A very public controversy has engulfed the world of video games, centered around the treatment of women and minorities in the gaming culture.

The debate has ramifications for educators, as schools ponder the educational potential of online games and the need to protect young people who play them. For some perspective on this issue we turned to Rafael Johns, a reporter for Youth Radio. Here's his commentary:

I enjoy video games.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Matthew Richter, Seattle's cultural space liaison, about the recently approved program to create official arts districts around the city. 

HYDERABAD, INDIA – The road to Hyderabad winds through a landscape of ancient boulders – some three or four stories high. The earth-colored stones fill wide gaps between the sleek, high-rise towers that push the city’s skyline and suburbs to new limits.

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