How We Live

Organizers of the U.S. Open men's golf championship are exuding confidence that Chambers Bay Golf Course overlooking Puget Sound will be ready for the tee off in less than three weeks.

'Week in Review' kicked off its summer tour in the lovely Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

How will Seattle's new City Council districts change the way neighborhood interests are represented at City Hall? What do you learn when your run for office comes up short (by just a few signatures)? What's keeping state lawmakers from packing up and going home? And will a new ban on smoking in parks make Seattle a happier or more stressed-out place?

Bill Radke debates these stories and more of the week's news with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Seattle Channel host Joni Balter and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

This show was broadcast in front of a live audience from the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle as part of WIR's summer tour. 

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Robi Ganguly, co-founder of the Seattle-based mobile startup Apptentive, about his company's goal to build a diverse workforce.

Melinda Jankord-Steedman and Phyllis Jantz at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center for the 'Week in Review' summer tour stop on Friday, May 29.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing – that issue is atop the minds of a lot of people in West Seattle and beyond.

KUOW's Week in Review broadcast live Friday from Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle's Delridge area to kick off the show's summer tour through all of the newly formed Seattle City Council districts (find yours on our district map). 

The revamped entrance to The Parker Apartments on Queen Anne Hill.
Bellwether Housing

Money is a big problem for nonprofits trying to build affordable housing. It’s expensive to redevelop old buildings or build new ones.

There are tax credits and grants, and in Seattle there’s money from the city housing levy.

But one group is tapping a new source: private investors, who get a return on the money they put into affordable housing.

On the shores of California one recent morning, female Marines were heaving heavy chains to secure amphibious assault vehicles that soon would roll into the waves.

The exercise was one part of a yearlong experiment aimed at settling the question of whether women can handle the punishing world of ground combat.

I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia. And so on.

It was one of the many surprises of an evening spent watching the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night near Washington.

Another big surprise was how much I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I had expected to see a bunch of highly trained kids who've spent months and years memorizing the dictionary, essentially regurgitating that information.

Artist C. Davida Ingram's exhibition, "Eyes to Dream: A Project Room," is a rumination of what it means to be black and female in America in 2015.
Courtesy of C. Davida Ingram

The smell.

That's the first thing you notice in C. Davida Ingram's exhibition at the Northwest African American Museum.

It smells like the sea: fishy and briny, with a sort of musky undertone. You can trace those aromas, in part, to a white dress that's hanging on the gallery wall. Thousands of tiny fish that look like minnows or sardines are sewn onto the fabric.

The Seattle Police Department's "Safe Place" decal.
Seattle Police

David Hyde speaks with officer Jim Ritter, LGBTQ Liaison for the Seattle Police Department, about the new Safe Place program which aims to keep the city's LGBTQ community safe from harassment and violence. 

Aneesh Sheth speaks at KUOW's Storywallahs event in early May at the Kirkland Performing Arts Center.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The South Asian community in the United States has roots in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The community represents one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the country. From 2000 to 2010 their population grew by 81 percent nationally, in Seattle the increase was 173 percent.

RadioActive Tests The Issues

May 28, 2015
Scantron test
Flickr Photo/biologycorner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This month RadioActive is taking issues on the minds of many Seattleites. We’ll hear about standardized testing in the Seattle school district, diversity issues in the Tukwila school district and a profile of the first Islamophobia Awareness Day. Plus we'll hear about one woman’s experience as a reporter during the Sri Lankan civil war.

RadioActive is KUOW's program for youth age 16-20ish. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

The nationwide weirdness that was the Windshield-Pitting Mystery began in the spring of 1954. Looking back at the events today may give us a window — OK, a windshield — on the makeup and the mindset of mid-20th-century America.

The world's largest refugee camp is also a giant social experiment.

Take hundreds of thousands of Somalis fleeing a war. Shelter them for 24 years in a camp in Kenya run by the United Nations. And offer different opportunities than they might have had if they'd stayed in Somalia.

The Kenyan government wants the experiment to end — soon. It's pushing the refugees to return to their home in Somalia, though the camp called Dadaab is the only home many have known.

Seattle's proposed ban would apply to people lighting up tobacco products. Washington state law prohibits marijuana smoking in public places.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle officials want to ban smoking in all public parks, but some opponents say the crackdown would unfairly target homeless people.

A park advisory board will take up the issue for a possible vote Thursday night.

As KUOW's Liz Jones reports, public opinion is mixed.

photo courtesy of Sumaiya Mahee

(Reader's Note: Sumaiya Mahee wrote this essay "You're Not Who You Say You Are: Beyond the Single Story" for her 8th grade English class in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It was part of a course that taught all students that they each have been stereotyped — and how those stories are generally all wrong.)

Pages