How We Live

Older women are my heroes. I'm envious of their knowledge — the beautiful, rich kind of knowing that only unfurls with time, patience and experience.

For example, here is a thing that NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg knows: how to explain the complexities of the U.S. legal system in an engaging, thoughtful way. When some people think of the Supreme Court, they hear Nina's voice in their head.

For young Saudis, life is conducted online, on phones and on gaming platforms. Saudi Arabia is a young country. The fastest-growing segment of the population is under 30 years old. In this deeply conservative society, with its strict moral codes of behavior and gender segregation, many young Saudis turn to social media and technology to entertain and express themselves.

For women, especially, it's a social revolution.

Winemaker Charles Smith
Courtesy of Charles Smith Wines

Ross Reynolds interviews Charles Smith, one of Washington state’s winemaking stars. He managed rock bands in Denmark before moving to Walla Walla, Washington in 1999. Despite knowing little about making wine, he’s gone on to become successful, even being named Wine Enthusiast magazine's wine maker of the year last year. 

In America, our food options are remarkably unaffected by the changing seasons. We just keep eating salad greens and tomatoes without regard to the onset of winter.

In most of the country, there's little chance that the greens we eat in the late fall and winter are locally grown.

But if there were greenhouses nearby, they could be. And in a small but growing number of places, local greenhouses are there.

Take Lower Makefield Township, Penn., right across the Delaware River from Trenton, N.J.

Ending a run of more than 30 years on the air, talk show host Diane Rehm plans to retire, according to WAMU, the NPR member station where the show is produced in Washington, D.C.

Rehm's exit from the show will not take place immediately; she is expected to remain as its host through the 2016 presidential election. A date for her exit has not been established.

Being older than 65, single and looking for romance has never been easy, and for women, who outnumber single men, it's especially challenging. The Internet is making it easier for older women, who didn't grow up with the Web, to get outside their social circles for dating and romance, but it can make them more vulnerable to deception.

Kimberly Bodfish, who's single and 65+, has discovered what many people already know about dating online: People are a little generous about themselves in their profiles.

Army recruits in Seattle being fitted for uniforms after the Pearl Harbor attack, 1941.
Courtesy of MOHAI, Seattle P-I Collection, PI28235

David Hyde speaks with local historian and radio producer Feliks Banel about the reaction of the Pearl Harbor attack in Seattle and the lasting impact it left on the city. 

A Google map shows the outline of the North Seattle eruv.
KUOW Staff

After the sun sets on Fridays, Orthodox Jews may not push a stroller. Nor may they carry tissues or books outside their homes.

But there’s a loophole: People who live within certain neighborhood boundaries may carry books and babies outside.

When Mae Lynn Reyes-Rodríguez was a graduate student in psychology at the University of Puerto Rico in the early 1990s, she learned there were no studies of how many Latinos suffered from anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder.

Growing up, Natalie Devora always questioned how she fit into her African-American family.

"Everyone was brown, and then there was me," Devora says. "I'm a white-skinned black woman. That's how I navigate through the world. That's how I identify."

Wouldn't it be nice to get a check from your electric utility instead of a bill? That's exactly what happens for a select few homeowners in the Pacific Northwest whose solar-powered houses generate more electricity than they use over the course of the year.

'Week in Review' panel Melanie McFarland, Dan Savage, Rob McKenna and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Was the UW women’s crew coach inspiring his athletes, psychologically abusing them,  or something in between? Also, how do we honor American history when it wasn’t always honorable? And, we all react to shooting after shooting after shooting.

Bill Radke’s guests inclue Stranger editorial director Dan Savage, former Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, and McTelevision’s Melanie McFarland; plus Seattle Times sportswriter Geoff Baker.

Bill Radke speaks with Geoff Baker, sports writer for the Seattle Times, about the University of Washington's decision to fire women's crew coach Bob Ernst.

We also hear from Dan Savage, editorial director of the Stranger, Melanie McFarland, journalist and TV critic, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general, about tough love from sports coaches and whether it helps or hurts athletes.

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke speaks with Dan Savage, editorial director of the Stranger, Melanie McFarland, journalist and TV critic, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general, about race relations on college campuses.

You may remember the good old days when a domestic airline seat came with free checked bags and a meal. Now just about all coach passengers have to pay for those things. Next year, Seattle-based Alaska Airlines will join competitors in offering a "premium economy" class with more legroom for a fee.

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