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How We Live

Hot-Dog Tiaras And Other '70s Dinner Party' Delicacies

Dec 2, 2016

Last summer, Anna Pallai was leafing through her mom's cookbooks — sauce-splashed volumes of Robert Carrier recipes, issues of Supercook pinched together in a ringed binder — when she realized she'd stumbled across a gold mine. The books were full of meaty aspics and mousses coaxed into elaborate shapes: a crown made of blunted hot dogs, seafood mousse sculpted into the shape of a maniacally grinning fish.

When you walk into the Smithsonian's "Art of the Qur'an" exhibition, you're met with a book that weighs 150 pounds. The tome, which dates back to the late-1500s, has giant pages that are covered in gold and black Arabic script.

Phillip Deng at Ignite Seattle 31
Photo courtesy of Randy Stewart

The Ignite series brings locals together to share ideas, inspirations and understanding in a rapid-fire, accessible format. The program was invented here, and you’re invited.

Ignite Seattle 31 took place on November 17 at Town Hall Seattle. Sonya Harris recorded the talks. Scott Berkun was the emcee. 

Carlos Rodriguez has come out as undocumented after keeping his immigration status a secret for most of his life
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

For most of his life, Carlos Rodriguez had a secret.

But after this year's presidential election, he decided the time for silence was over. So, on November 18, he wrote a letter to his fellow students at Seattle University. 

Christmas is coming, and soon TV screens everywhere will light up with that 1946 holiday classic, It's a Wonderful Life. But the same story is coming a little early to the stage of the Houston Grand Opera. That's right: An operatic version of George Bailey's struggle with life and death opens this Friday.

Librettist Gene Scheer admits that adapting such a beloved movie has sometimes felt like a fool's errand. "It's almost secular scripture, this piece," he says. "Everyone knows all the lines."

Andrew Gomez
Courtesy of Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke spoke with Andrew Gomez, a Cuban-American who teaches modern Latin American history and U.S. history at the University of Puget Sound. Gomez was visiting family in Miami the day of Fidel Castro's death. He describes how he and his father, a Cuban immigrant, processed the death of the controversial leader and the country's possible future.

Nearly 2,000 people in New Zealand are gearing up to spread a little joy by giving a gift to a stranger.

When it comes to assessing the possible risks and benefits of science and technology, who is the relevant authority?

University scientists? Industry scientists? Religious organizations?

Kale Is About To Have An Identity Crisis

Nov 28, 2016

Kale is getting a makeover, and the very essence of kaliness may hang in the balance.

To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, horticulture professor Philip Griffiths of Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Science and graduate student Hannah Swegarden are soliciting consumers' kale reflections — the good, the bad, and the ugly. The scientists face a philosophic question for the ages. Asks Swegarden:

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.

Flickr Photo/dcJohn (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7iCjJU

Bill Radke speaks with  Luke Burbank, host of the public radio show Live Wire, about how he plans to handle family, politics and stuffing this Thanksgiving. They also listen to calls from listeners about how they are tackling a fraught holiday.

The annual turkey pardon is a silly tradition, and President Obama knows it. On Wednesday, before pardoning turkeys named Tater and Tot, Obama summed up his feelings about this particular duty.

"It is my great privilege — well, it's my privilege — actually, let's just say it's my job to grant them clemency this afternoon," Obama said.

Gov. George Wallace, left, attempts to block integration at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.
By Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of hate crimes have been reported since the recent presidential election, including several incidents in the greater Seattle area.  Many people are scared and uncertain about where things are headed next.

But University of Washington professor Margaret O’Mara says studying history gives her reason to hope.


Kids are writing letters to president-elect Trump
Facebook Photo/Dear President Trump: Letters From Kids About Kindness

Any way you dice it, the election of Donald Trump has brought on a lot of feelings. 

Many adults have expressed those feelings online, on social media and through taking to the streets. But what about our kids?

On election night, did you already have a bad feeling about your family Thanksgiving? One Northwest brother and sister did. Jessica Brady and Jeremy Holmes both voted for Hillary Clinton. Their parents didn’t.

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