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Faaaaat Albert!
8:07 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To '70s Black Animation Art

An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.
Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 10:34 am

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Music History
2:45 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

How Jewish Composers Created Iconic Christmas Music

Irving Berlin was a Jewish composer who created one of the most popular songs of all time: "White Christmas."
From Wikipedia.

Steve Scher talks with Amanda Wilde, host and producer of KUOW's The Swing Years,  about how immigrant Jewish popular music composers shaped America’s perceptions of Christmas through music.

Puzzles
3:19 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

What Is 9 Letters Long And Turns 100 Tomorrow?

Flickr Photo/Philippa Willitts

Marcie Sillman discusses the origin of the first crossword puzzle with puzzle author Merl Reagle in honor of the crossword's 100th birthday on Saturday.

History
4:06 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

What Happened With Mandatory Busing In Seattle And Around The Country?

Courtesy of Seattle Public Schools Archive

David Hyde speaks with Kenneth C. Davis, the author of "Don’t Know Much About History," about the history of mandatory busing in America.

Radio Retrospective
12:37 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

The Sad Story Behind ‘White Christmas,’ America’s Favorite Christmas Carol

Bing Crosby recorded "White Christmas" in 1942, pictured, after the song premiered on a Christmas radio broadcast in 1941. The original song has been lost, leaving the 1947 re-recording.
Credit From Wikipedia.

The most popular Christmas carol in America stands apart from the others in a number of ways: It’s not upbeat, there are no fanciful characters and it isn’t religious. Instead, it’s melancholy and wistful – full of longing for bygone days.

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The Seattle Plan
12:06 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Memories Of Busing In Seattle

Seattle was the first major city to voluntarily adopt a comprehensive desegration policy. The busing program lasted from 1972 to 1999.
Courtesy of MOHAI, Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, 2000.107

David Hyde hears from three listeners about their experiences with the Seattle Plan. Heather, Martin, and Robert talk about their memories of the race-based busing program enacted by the Seattle School Board that lasted from 1972 to 1999.

What Stopped Bertha?
4:55 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Boring Bertha Digs Through Layers Of Seattle History

An inside view of Bertha, the multi-million dollar tunneling machine.
Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Transportation

The most plausible theory about what stopped Bertha, the tunneling machine digging its way through downtown until last Saturday, is also the most boring.

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Georgetown Live, Part One
12:48 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Georgetown Live: 'An Exceptionally Tight-knit Community'

Chef Matt Dillon's restaurant The Corson Building.
Flickr Photo/The Kozy Shack

The Record kicks off Georgetown Live with the district's unofficial historian, metro issues, an artistic uprising and a unique dining experience.

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Music History
2:47 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Harry Smith's Weird Old America

Harry Smith, a true American original, in 1965.
Credit From Wikipedia.

The Anthology of American Folk Music is one of the most influential recordings in history. The Anthology brings together American roots music that was saved from destruction by a local man in the days before World War II.

Born in Portland, Ore., and raised around Bellingham and Seattle, Harry Smith was an eccentric painter, film maker, and anthropologist who convinced gathered  music from forgotten 78 rpm records originally released between 1927 and 1932 at the dawn of popular culture.

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Humorous History
2:57 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

The US Constitution: Loved By Many, Read By Few...Except Colin Quinn

Colin Quinn on his solo comedy tour "Unconstitional."
Mike Lavoie

Steve Scher talks with comedian Colin Quinn about what he learned when he decided to sit down and read the entire US Constitution. Quinn's solo show about the Founding Fathers is "Unconstitutional."

Author Interview
3:49 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

United States And Pakistan: An Epic History Of Misunderstanding

Husaon Haqqani's book "Magnificent Delusions."

Marcie Sillman talks with Husain Haqqani, the former Pakistan Ambassador to the US, about his new book "Magnificent Delusions."

Before Grunge
3:13 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

When A Small Seattle Label Convinced Kurt Cobain To Play On

Sub Pop co-founder Bruce Pavitt onstage behind Nirvana at LameFest UK in December 1989, as Kris Novoselic prepares to put a bass guitar out of its misery.
Courtesy of Bazillion Points Books/Steve Double

In June 1989, Sub Pop Records rented out the Moore Theatre in Seattle to showcase three of its up-and-coming bands: Mudhoney, Tad and Nirvana. The manager sent security home early because he didn’t think anyone would show up.

The manager was wrong: It was the first sold-out show by a local group. The lack of control and the chaos from a crazy crowd resulted in Sub Pop being blacklisted from the Moore for the next 10 years.

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Author Interview
2:53 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

America's Mirror: Appreciating The Art Of Norman Rockwell

Deborah Solomon's book "American Mirror."

Ross Reynolds talks with author Deborah Solomon about her book "American Mirror: The Life And Art Of Norman Rockwell."

Author Interview
3:58 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Michelle Alexander On How Incarceration Is "The New Jim Crow"

Michelle Alexander's book "The New Jim Crow."

Ross Reynolds talks with Michelle Alexander, author of "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness", about the US criminal justice system and racial control.

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Author Interview
2:27 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

An Inside Look At The Bush-Cheney Years In The White House

Peter Baker's book "Days of Fire."

Marcie Sillman interviews New York Times chief White House correspondent Peter Baker about his chronicle of the Bush/Cheney administration called "Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House."

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