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A Whale's Wail
5:00 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Call Of The Sound: Romance Of Foghorns Endures

A Washington state ferry moves through the fog.
Flickr Photo/Steve Johnson

If you live near downtown Seattle, you may have recently heard a long, low horn reverberating through the soupy nighttime air.

It happens every once in a while and has some Seattleites mystified. Where does the sound come from? It is a train? A boat? Last call at a Capitol Hill bar?

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History
3:59 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Long Road Back: Polish-Jewish Relations Today

Louise Steinman's book "The Crooked Mirror."

"Do they miss us?”

That was the question on Louise Steinman’s mind  when she decided to travel to Poland and explore the country’s efforts at reconciliation with their traumatic past of dual occupations of the Nazis and Soviets.

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War Pilgrimage
3:42 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Back To Vietnam: One Veteran's Story

Bahia de Halong, Vietnam
Flickr Photo/fontxito

Ross Reynolds sits down with Richard Brummett, a Vietnam War veteran who is one of thousands of vets who have made pilgrimages back to the country where they fought.

Seattle History
2:51 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Norm Rice, Seattle's 'Mayor Nice,' Says It's Time To Retire

Norm Rice, left, and Barack Obama, around 2008.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

It's been more than a decade since Norman B. Rice ran Seattle. But Seattleites still remember “Mayor Nice,” as he was known.

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International District
9:38 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Fire Burns Historic Seattle Building Where Wah Mee Massacre Took Place

A Seattle Fire truck retracts a ladder from the Hudson Building in the International District where a fire burned the upper floors of a century-old brick building.
Credit KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Djin Kwie Liem estimates he lost 20,000 fish.

“Goldfish, koi, tropical fish,” he specified.

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Faaaaat Albert!
8:07 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To '70s Black Animation Art

An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.
Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 10:34 am

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Music History
2:45 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

How Jewish Composers Created Iconic Christmas Music

Irving Berlin was a Jewish composer who created one of the most popular songs of all time: "White Christmas."
From Wikipedia.

Steve Scher talks with Amanda Wilde, host and producer of KUOW's The Swing Years,  about how immigrant Jewish popular music composers shaped America’s perceptions of Christmas through music.

Puzzles
3:19 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

What Is 9 Letters Long And Turns 100 Tomorrow?

Flickr Photo/Philippa Willitts

Marcie Sillman discusses the origin of the first crossword puzzle with puzzle author Merl Reagle in honor of the crossword's 100th birthday on Saturday.

History
4:06 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

What Happened With Mandatory Busing In Seattle And Around The Country?

Courtesy of Seattle Public Schools Archive

David Hyde speaks with Kenneth C. Davis, the author of "Don’t Know Much About History," about the history of mandatory busing in America.

Radio Retrospective
12:37 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

The Sad Story Behind ‘White Christmas,’ America’s Favorite Christmas Carol

Bing Crosby recorded "White Christmas" in 1942, pictured, after the song premiered on a Christmas radio broadcast in 1941. The original song has been lost, leaving the 1947 re-recording.
Credit From Wikipedia.

The most popular Christmas carol in America stands apart from the others in a number of ways: It’s not upbeat, there are no fanciful characters and it isn’t religious. Instead, it’s melancholy and wistful – full of longing for bygone days.

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The Seattle Plan
12:06 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Memories Of Busing In Seattle

Seattle was the first major city to voluntarily adopt a comprehensive desegration policy. The busing program lasted from 1972 to 1999.
Courtesy of MOHAI, Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, 2000.107

David Hyde hears from three listeners about their experiences with the Seattle Plan. Heather, Martin, and Robert talk about their memories of the race-based busing program enacted by the Seattle School Board that lasted from 1972 to 1999.

What Stopped Bertha?
4:55 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Boring Bertha Digs Through Layers Of Seattle History

An inside view of Bertha, the multi-million dollar tunneling machine.
Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Transportation

The most plausible theory about what stopped Bertha, the tunneling machine digging its way through downtown until last Saturday, is also the most boring.

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Georgetown Live, Part One
12:48 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Georgetown Live: 'An Exceptionally Tight-knit Community'

Chef Matt Dillon's restaurant The Corson Building.
Flickr Photo/The Kozy Shack

The Record kicks off Georgetown Live with the district's unofficial historian, metro issues, an artistic uprising and a unique dining experience.

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Music History
2:47 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Harry Smith's Weird Old America

Harry Smith, a true American original, in 1965.
Credit From Wikipedia.

The Anthology of American Folk Music is one of the most influential recordings in history. The Anthology brings together American roots music that was saved from destruction by a local man in the days before World War II.

Born in Portland, Ore., and raised around Bellingham and Seattle, Harry Smith was an eccentric painter, film maker, and anthropologist who convinced gathered  music from forgotten 78 rpm records originally released between 1927 and 1932 at the dawn of popular culture.

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Author Interview
10:45 am
Thu December 12, 2013

Benny And Jenny: Uncovering The Franklin Sibling Relationship

Author and historian Jill Lepore speaking at event for Kansas City Public Library.
Flickr Photo/Kansas City Public Library

When they were little, they were called Benny and Jenny. They were inseparable. But as they grew up, their lives took different paths. Benjamin Franklin left home; his sister Jane Franklin never did. He taught himself to write; she couldn’t spell. He signed the Declaration and the Constitution; she became a wife, mother, and ultimately, a widow.

But they maintained a correspondence throughout their lives, and historian Jill Lepore says Franklin loved no one more than his sister. Lepore shed light on this story at Seattle’s Town Hall on October 9.

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