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Still I Rise
7:06 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Maya Angelou, Poet, Activist And Singular Storyteller, Dies At 86

Angelou became Hollywood's first black female movie director on Nov. 3, 1971. She also wrote the script and music for Caged Bird, which was based on her best-selling 1969 autobiography. She had been a professional singer, dancer, writer, composer, poet, lecturer, editor and San Francisco streetcar conductor.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:58 am

Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou grew up in a segregated society that she worked to change during the civil rights era. Angelou, who refused to speak for much of her childhood, revealed the scars of her past in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of a series of memoirs.

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Documentary
1:55 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Honor And Sacrifice: The Roy Matsumoto Story

A still from a Kickstarter trailer for the film "Honor and Sacrifice" about the life of WWII hero Roy Matsumoto.
Credit YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with film maker Don Sellers and Karen Matsumoto, the daughter of World War II hero Roy Matsumoto. 

Roy Matsumoto enlisted in the army to get out of a Japanese American internment camp. He went on to serve  as a translator for the Merrill’s Marauders behind enemy lines in the Burma and won a medal for outstanding bravery.

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Radio Retrospective
1:21 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

World War II, When Radio Was Star

Frank Sinatra being interviewed on radio during World War II.
Credit Credit Wikimedia Commons

During World War II, just about everyone got involved, from enlisting to saving their kitchen grease to build ammunition.

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Author Interview
10:18 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Nomi Prins On The History Of Wall Street And The White House

Credit Nomi Prins' new book, "All the Presidents' Bankers"

In Nomi Prins' new book "All the Presidents' Bankers," she delves into over a century of close ties between the White House and Wall Street. Using archival correspondence, she explores the ways a small group of influential people, elected and not, has shaped American policy at home and abroad. The book details economic expansion, contraction and crises from the panic of 1907 to today, in the context of what Prins calls America’s genealogy of power.

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Seattle's Past
4:32 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Matt Smith's Last Year With The Nuns

Matt Smith in "My Last Year With The Nuns"
Credit John Jeffcoat, courtesy Matt Smith

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

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Sakura Celebration
11:06 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Japan Gifts UW With 18 Cherry Trees

Members of Seattle Kokon Taiko perform at a dedication ceremony for 18 new cherry trees given to the University of Washington from Japan.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

One of the first signs of spring is when the cherry trees bloom at the University of Washington. The iconic trees on the quad have become a symbol of the University’s ties to Japan. Yesterday, the University celebrated a gift from Japan — 18 new cherry trees to add to the campus.

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Sakura
3:25 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Japanese Cherry Trees Harken Back To Darker Times At UW

One of the 30 young cherry trees the University of Washington dedicated in a ceremony on Tuesday.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

In a ceremony on Tuesday morning, the University of Washington dedicated more than 30 young cherry trees, gifts from Japan.

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Historical Find
3:07 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Naia Provides New Insight On Early Americans

Steve Scher talks to James Chatters, the lead investigator researching Naia, a 13,000 year old skull found in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Naia's skull is one of the best preserved and among the oldest skulls found.

Farming
10:43 am
Fri May 16, 2014

How To Win An Old-Fashioned Plowing Competition

Courtney Polinder plows at the 2013 International Plowing Match while his wife, Heidi, right, helps steer the horses in the furrow. Courtney’s grandfather, Fred Polinder, began competing at the plowing match in 1943.
Sarah Eden Wallace

The horses are beefy, the farmers nostalgic and the legacy long.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:53 am
Tue May 13, 2014

The Forgotten History Of Climate-Change Science

It has been a full century since the engine driving climate change was first discovered. It's been more than a half-century since the risks entered the realm of public policy.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:01 am

It's a fine mess we've gotten ourselves into. Last week the National Climate Assessment report was released detailing the toll climate change is already taking on the United States in terms of droughts, floods, heat waves and changes in agriculture.

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Data Recording
3:34 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

The Origins Of The Black Box

Black boxes actually aren't generally black, like this one from a boat. They are used to collect voyage data from ships and planes.
Credit Flickr Photo/Adventures of KM&G-Morris

Ross Reynolds talks to Joseph Janes, University of Washington professor from the information school, about the origins of the black box in airplanes. Janes is host of the podcast "Documents That Changed The World."

Makah Indian Reservation
6:47 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Japanese Retrace Path Of History-Making Castaways, 180 Years Later

File photo of the 'Monument to the Three Kichis,' at Fort Vancouver, Washington.
nsub1 Flickr

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:48 pm

After 180 years, it is not too late to say thank you. That is what a Japanese delegation did last week as it retraced the history-making path of three  castaways to the Makah Indian Reservation on the Washington coast.

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Language
9:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Segregated From Its History, How 'Ghetto' Lost Its Meaning

The pushcart market in the East Side Ghetto of New York's Jewish Quarter was a hive of activity in the early 1900s.
Ewing Galloway Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 2:32 pm

As you might have gathered from our blog's title, the Code Switch team is kind of obsessed with the ways we speak to each other. Each week in "Word Watch," we'll dig into language that tells us something about the way race is lived in America today. (Interested in contributing? Holler at this form.)

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Author Interview
9:44 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Benny And Jenny: Uncovering The Franklin Sibling Relationship

Author and historian Jill Lepore speaking at event for Kansas City Public Library.
Flickr Photo/Kansas City Public Library

When they were little, they were called Benny and Jenny. They were inseparable. But as they grew up, their lives took different paths. Benjamin Franklin left home; his sister Jane Franklin never did. He taught himself to write; she couldn’t spell. He signed the Declaration and the Constitution; she became a wife, mother, and ultimately, a widow.

But they maintained a correspondence throughout their lives, and historian Jill Lepore says Franklin loved no one more than his sister. Lepore shed light on this story at Seattle’s Town Hall on October 9.

This story originally aired on December 12, 2013.

Bard's Words
9:18 am
Wed April 23, 2014

It's A Foregone Conclusion That You Are Quoting Shakespeare

Flickr Photo/Calamity Meg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

To celebrate William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, Christopher Gaze takes a moment to remind you how the great playwright lives in the way you talk. Gaze is the artistic director of the annual Bard on the Beach festival in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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