History

Pages

American Gun History
3:35 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Can You Remember When The Second Amendment Was A Non-Issue?

Credit Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Michael Waldman about his new book "The Second Amendment: A Biography." Gun control has been a hot topic for years and the debate will play out in Washington this November in the form of two rival initiatives on guns. 

Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, says for decades of American history the Second Amendment was a non-issue. 

Seattle History
3:35 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Nell Pickerell, A Trans Man From Seattle's Rough And Tumble Days

A police mug shot of Nell Pickerell, also known as Harry Allen. Nell was a dapper dresser and notorious heartbreaker in Seattle in the early 1920s.
Credit Via Crosscut

Seattle writer Knute Berger was combing through old articles when he spotted an unusual character: “A woman, dressed as a man, riding a bike recklessly.”

Read more
Wildfires
9:02 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Tim Egan On How A Fire In 1910 Shaped Firefighting

Little North Fork of the St. Joe River, Idaho.
Credit Credit Wikimedia Commons

Ross Reynolds talks with Tim Egan, columnist for the New York Times, about the Devil's Broom fire in 1910. The conflagration was the largest in United States history, burning 3 million acres in the Pacific Northwest, and set the stage for modern firefighting.

History
1:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Interns who host tours on Capitol Hill, stopping at sites like the small Senate rotunda, don't always have their facts straight.
The Architect of the Capitol

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:04 pm

Every summer thousands of interns flood the offices of Capitol Hill. One of their primary duties is to give constituents tours of the famous buildings. They parade visitors from the rotunda to statuary hall, offering stories and anecdotes.

But while these intern tours provide a great deal of information, they are sometimes a little short on actual history.

Read more
Obituary
2:38 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Friend, Deputy Remember Former Mayor Paul Schell

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Chamber of Commerce Acting CEO Maud Daudon about former Seattle Mayor Paul Schell. Daudon served as deputy mayor and chief of staff under Schell from 1998 to 2001. In addition, Ross discusses Schell’s legacy with David Brewster, founder of the Seattle Weekly, who was a personal friend. Schell died Sunday at the age of 76.

Johnpaul Jones
8:36 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Memories Of Exclusion Inspire Seattle Architect's Work

President Barack Obama awards the 2013 National Humanities Medal to architect Johnpaul Jones from Bainbridge, Wash., during a ceremony in the East Room at the White House in Washington, July 28, 2014.
Credit AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

Seattle architect Johnpaul Jones will receive the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama on Monday. The White House says he will be the second Native American to receive the medal.

Read more
Obituary
12:16 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Paul Schell, Innkeeper And Former Seattle Mayor, Dies At 76

Former Seattle Mayor Paul Schell in 1999.
Credit Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

He is the reason fish fly at the Pike Place Market, or so the story goes.

On Sunday, Paul Schell, a former Seattle mayor and champion of urban neighborhoods, died. He was 76.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Ed Murray confirmed that Schell died at Swedish Hospital.

Read more
Performing Arts
2:22 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

The Racial Undertones Of 'The Mikado'

'The Mikado' presented by Metro Theatre, Vancouver, in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Metro Theatre Vancouver (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Josephine Lee, English and Asian American studies professor at the University of Minnesota, about the checkered history of the Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado."

Read more
History
2:49 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Washington's Last Waltz With Ending Prohibition

Ross Reynolds talks to Redmond Barnett, head of the exhibits department for the Washington State Historical Society, about what happened the last time the state lifted prohibition.

Dental Work
3:07 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

This Dirty Little Weed May Have Cleaned Up Ancient Teeth

This young male, buried at a prehistoric site in Central Sudan, probably munched on the roots of a plant called purple nutsedge.
Donatella Usai Centro Studi Sudanesi and Sub-Sahariani

Originally published on Sun August 3, 2014 5:19 am

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Read more
Author Interview
3:28 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

It's Time We All Embrace Contrarian History

Ross Reynolds talks with Ilan Stavans about his new book, “A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States."

History
2:06 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Firemen's Ball Ushers In France's Bastille Day

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 9:34 am

On this day in 1789, crowds stormed the Bastille prison, where the king kept his enemies. The monarchy was overthrown in a revolution.

Author Interview
2:52 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Susan Jacoby Says You Should Know Who Robert Ingersoll Is

David Hyde talks with author Susan Jacoby about her new book, "The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought," the story of a historic figure for the separation of church and state.

Soccer History
2:45 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

When 'The Beautiful Game' Was Chaotic And Dangerous

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about the original rules of soccer, published in 1863.

History
2:13 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Potsdamer Square's Revitalization Since The Fall Of The Berlin Wall 25 Years Ago

Potsdamer Square, 1965
Credit German Architecture.org

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Schneider, author of "Berlin Now," about the vast changes there since the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago this November.

The two spoke in  Potsdamer Square, which in the 1920s was Berlin's Times Square.

But it was bombed to rubble during World War II.

In 1962 the Berlin Wall, dominated by a wide "kill zone," was built right down the middle of the square. 

Following the fall of the wall in 1989, Potsdamer was reborn. It has become once again a Berlin landmark.

Read more

Pages