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The Last Show
9:02 am
Fri December 28, 2012

This NOT Just In: The Last Episode Of J.P. Patches

J.P. Patches and Gertrude from The J.P. Patches Show.
Credit Courtesy of Chris Wedes

Chris Wedes passed away earlier this year after a long battle with cancer.  Wedes was the host of the long-running JP Patches Show on KIRO TV and one of the region's most beloved figures.  "This NOT Just In" looks back to the final weekday episode of the popular program, back in December 1978.

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A Life-Changing Decision
9:16 am
Thu December 27, 2012

Seattle Woman's Great Aunt Faced Tough Decision On The Titanic

The Titanic
Credit Courtesy of George Behe's Collection

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Most people who boarded the luxury ocean liner didn’t survive the trip. For some, the only thing separating survival and drowning was a split-second decision.

Now, 100 years after the tragedy, a Seattle woman wonders what she would do if she had been in her relative's shoes on the night of the sinking.

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Santa Facts
11:13 am
Mon December 24, 2012

What Do You Really Know About St. Nicholas?

Michael Sciaraffois, costumed as Santa Claus, makes a toy delivery to a home in the Bell Harbor neighborhood of New York, Dec. 18, 2012.
Bebeto Matthews AP Photo

You think you know him: red suit, white beard, jolly old elf, etc. But do you why St. Nicholas became the Patron Saint Of Prisoners? David Hyde talks with Adam English, author of "The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus: The True Life And Trials Of Nicholas Of Myra."

US Presidents
8:00 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Thomas Jefferson V. Theodore Roosevelt: A 21st Century Presidential Debate

Thomas Jefferson v. Theodore Roosevelt: Great American presidents in a 21st Century debate.
Credit courtesy/Wikipedia

Clay Jenkinson assumes both sides in a debate between two of the country's greatest presidents: Thomas Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt. Jenkinson is a historian who commonly lectures as different historical figures. He spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on December 1, 2012.

History
7:03 am
Fri December 14, 2012

UW 150: Downtown Real Estate Helps Fund University

University Street sign.
Flickr photo/Michael Hilton

In Downtown Seattle, near where the Fairmont Olympic Hotel now stands, history was made back in 1861. The University of Washington was founded at this spot by a small group of local boosters, with the blessing of the Territorial Legislature. Seattle pioneer Arthur Denny donated the land. A single hall was built that housed the UW during the school's early decades, but the UW outgrew its first campus, and had to move and leave behind the old downtown site.

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History
8:00 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Thomas Jefferson: Success, Power And Vision

Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale.
Credit Courtesy/Wikipedia

Jon Meacham's new biography of Thomas Jefferson paints the founding father as the most successful political leader of early America, and possibly all of US history. "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" discusses Jefferson's passion for his nation in the country's fledgling years and reviews the man's genius and his faults.

Meacham spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on November 28, 2012.

Books
10:00 am
Thu December 13, 2012

Douglas Smith On The Final Days Of The Russian Aristocracy

Douglas Smith's
Credit courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

In 1917, the glittering elite of Tzarist Russia were crushed, practically overnight, by the Communist revolution. What happened to the nearly two million people who lived at the top of Russian society? Douglas Smith, awarding-winning historian and author, joins us to talk about "Former People: The Final Days of the Russian Aristocracy."

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History
5:02 am
Fri December 7, 2012

How We Mourned John Lennon Before The Internet

John Lennon rehearsing "Give Peace A Chance," 1969.
Roy Kerwood Wikipedia

John Lennon was murdered 30 years ago. We'll look back at how Seattleites mourned the death of the former Beatle in a time before the Internet, social media and cell phones.

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Baseball History
11:06 am
Mon December 3, 2012

Baseball: A Mirror For America

University Heights Baseball Team, Seattle, circa 1920s
Credit Seattle Municipal Archives

What does Baseball history tell us about America? That we’re a nation of scandals and corrupt leadership, of racial prejudice and cold economic calculus. But we’re also a nation of humility and redemption. William Woodward teaches American history at SPU and preaches the gospel of baseball all over Washington state. The narrative he sees  in baseball gives him hope – not just for America, but for the human condition. Professor Woodward gives Ross Reynolds his pitch.

International News
10:00 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Tamim Ansary On Afghanistan's Interrupted History

The US military and its allies are drawing up plans to leave Afghanistan by 2014, but it will be some time before the nation is truly independent. Peace in Afghanistan has been interspersed with foreign invasion for centuries, from the Mongol Empire to today’s war. We talk with writer Tamim Ansary about his new book, “Game Without Rules: The Often Interrupted History of Afghanistan,” and what Afghan independence might look like in the future.

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Public Housing
3:44 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

The Radical Roots Of Yesler Terrace

Jesse Epstein (left) examining slum housing.

Yesler Terrace is Seattle's oldest public housing project. It was revolutionary when it was completed in 1940. In the near future, though, it will be completely demolished.

In its place will sprout a series of high rise towers with a limited number of low-income housing units alongside up to 4,000 market-rate private housing units, offices, retail and commercial spaces. The ultimate goal, says the Seattle Housing Authority, is to create a sustainable, healthy, mixed-income neighborhood.

It's a radical plan, controversial, and every bit as transformational as that which gave rise to Yesler Terrace in 1940.

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History
3:26 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

"War Of The Worlds" Broadcast Touches Off Panic In Pacific Northwest

"War of the Worlds" director and narrator, Orson Welles, 1937.
Library of Congress Van Vechten Collection

On October 30, 1938, Orson Wells' infamous "War of the Worlds" broadcast across the nation.  Fake news of a Martian landing fooled a lot of people on the East Coast, especially around New Jersey, where phony live reports described the alien landing site. But the most infamous panic of all didn't happen in the East. And it wasn't just a single person. It was an entire town, and it happened right here in Washington state.

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History
9:00 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Tim Egan On Edward Curtis, A Famous Photographer You Have Never Heard Of

Edward Curtis' "In A Pigean Lodge," 1910. This image has been criticized for retouching, implying manipulation of anthropological documents..
Wikipedia

Chances are you've seen the works of Edward Curtis, possibly without even realizing it. His images are the iconic, definitive photographs of Native Americans created as the 19th century expired and the 20th came into being. The huge project to photograph the surviving Indian tribes brought Edward Curtis from the fringes of high society to the edge of penury. He died almost forgotten a few years after publication of the last of his 20 volumes of images. The New York Times journalist and author Timothy Egan joins us to explore the remarkable life and work of Edward Curtis.

Also this hour we will hear from the two candidates running for Washington state's 9th Congressional District. Rep. Adam Smith and Jim Postma discuss the issues facing the state's first minority-majority district.

Slavery
12:00 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Slavery Story Has Seattle Ties

Cover of Carver Clark Gayton's book, "Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke, During a Captivity of More than Twenty-Five Years, Among the Algerines of Kentucky, One of the So Called Christian States of North America."

When Carver Clark Gayton was growing up in Seattle in the 1940s he didn’t hear anything about African-American history in school. But his mother told him stories, including one about his great-grandfather Lewis George Clarke.

Clarke was an escaped slave and an abolitionist. His personal story found its way into the anti-slavery novel "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" that went on to become the second most popular book in the 19th century. It’s seen as one of the causes of the Civil War.

Geology
11:25 am
Fri October 19, 2012

David Montgomery: "The Rocks Don't Lie"

David Montgomery, 2009.
Kvasir Society Photo/Joy Mathew

There are many stories of great floods out there, first and foremost the fable of Noah's ark. But some geologists have found that many of these legends have some basis in historical fact. We talk with University of Washington professor and MacArthur award-winner Dave Montgomery, the author of "The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood."

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