History

Pages

Historic Site Designation
11:10 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Wing Luke Museum Receives Federal Recognition

The Washington congressional delegation and outgoing Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar attended a ceremony to designate the Wing Luke Museum as a historic site Sunday.

Read more
Seattle On Foot
1:04 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

The Hidden Legacy Of Seattle Stairways

Cathy and Jake Jaramillo at the Blaine Street stairs.
KUOW photo/Jeannie Yandel

When I meet Jake and Cathy Jaramillo, they tell me they consider Seattle a world-class city when it comes to public stairways. According to Jake, Seattle’s 650 stairways put the city in the top three for US cities with stairways, with Pittsburgh in first place and San Francisco in second. And since they moved here in 2001, they've been climbing Seattle’s stairs to meet people and uncover some of the city’s hidden nooks and crannies.

Read more
Movies & History
12:37 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Frank Rich And Sean Wilentz On The Oscars And African-American History

Anne Hathaway, nominated for best actress in a supporting role for ‘Les Miserables,’ left, and Steven Spielberg, nominated for best picture and best director for ‘Lincoln,’ attend the 85th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013.
John Shearer/Invision/AP

David Hyde talks with Frank Rich about the historical significance of Quentin Tarantino’s "Django Unchained" and why Rich thinks it deserves to win an Academy Award for best picture. Then he turns to historian Sean Wilentz who thinks it is not "Django Unchained" but Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" that is the historically accurate and significant film that deserves the Oscar.

Seattle History
9:00 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Seattle's History In 25 Objects

Thousands of years ago this skeleton was a Giant Ground Sloth. These gigantic, bear-like animals were once common all over North America. This guy was around roughly at the end of the Ice-Age.
Burke Museum

What do a burned glue pot, a vintage cardigan and a Starbucks coffee cup share in common? In this case, each represents a chapter in Seattle's history. Inspired by the BBC's A History of the World In 100 Objects, we reached out to local museum curators, artifact owners, writers and historians to help us narrow down a list of 25 objects that tell Seattle’s story. Writer and author Knute Berger and MOHAI historian Lorraine McConaghy join us for a look into the past.

Read more
Radio History
2:44 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

The Rise Of KUOW And Public Radio In Seattle

Volunteers from Group Health answer phones for a KUOW pledge drive.
Group Health

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle. All this week we’ve been looking back at the history of radio in the Puget Sound Region. Today, Feliks Banel explores how local public radio has evolved over that last 30 years as a result of changes in commercial radio and the rise of national programming.

Read more
Food History
12:00 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

What's The Deal With Horse Slaughter?

Welsh mountain ponies auctioned for meat at the Llanybydder horse mart, Wales, 2006.
sheffpixie Flickr

Today in the US there’s not much of a market for horse meat. But believe it or not, there used to be over 20 US processing plants that sold American horse meat to Asian and European markets.


Last Friday The Conversation got a call from a listener demanding that President Obama reintroduce a ban on horse slaughter. So we got a little curious. Today Ross talks to Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes about the history of horse slaughter in the US.

Radio History
12:22 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

The Early Years Of KUOW

KUOW's early home back in 1955 at the Communications Building at the University of Washington.
University of Washington archives

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle.  In the second installment of a three-part series exploring the history of KUOW, Feliks Banel takes us back to the station’s early years before pledge drives and NPR, and then on to the rise of public radio in the 1970s.

Read more
Radio History
4:10 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

The Golden Years Of Radio In Seattle

Broadcasters around a microphone in the living room-like studio of radio station KFOA in Seattle's Rhodes Department store in 1923.
Courtesy of MOHAI

It’s been more than 60 years since KUOW first went on the air in Seattle, but local radio history goes back a bit further than that.  In the first installment of a three part series, Feliks Banel has the story of what radio sounded like around here in the years before KUOW.

Read more
Record Store Nostalgia
4:07 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Slideshow: Tacoma's Tower Records

The Tacoma Tower Records Store on 38th Street wasn’t just a store, it was a scene. Complete with cutting edge finds, knowledgeable staff, colorful displays, and intriguing people, music-hungry teens combed the aisles in search of new treasures.
Bill Hansen

KUOW listeners Whitney Keyes and Chris Porter share their memories of Tacoma Tower Records with us.

Whitney Keyes

“I grew up in Tacoma, Washington, and my favorite record store on the planet was the Tower Records near the Tacoma Mall. It was the go-to place to get the hottest 45s and albums -- and check out cute boys!

“I LOVED going down every aisle, alphabetically in my fave music categories, looking at the covers -- front and back of EVERY record.

Read more
Local Music Vendors
12:20 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Map: Do We Still Need Record Stores?

Luz Bratcher Flickr

Tomorrow is a dark day for many a Seattle vinyl enthusiast — Easy Street Records, the lower Queen Anne record store, is closing after serving the Emerald City for more than a dozen years. Many are bemoaning the loss of the Queen Anne record store, but what about you? Do record stores matter to you? I mean, do they really matter? Do you still buy music from stores, and how much?

With music available online through iTunes and services like Spotify, why do we still need record stores? Ross Reynolds talks with local music writer Charles Cross, Sarah Moody from Hardly Art and Eli Anderson from Neumos and takes listener calls.

Read more
Record Store Nostalgia
5:50 pm
Tue January 15, 2013

Celebrating Seattle’s Record Stores On Eve Of Easy Street Closure

Easy Street Records in Queen Anne, 2006.
Flickr photo/Laura Musselman Duffy

Seattle record store Easy Street is closing its Queen Anne location on Friday. While many local music lovers try to comfort one another, they’re also waxing poetic about how record stores used to be.

Read more
Seattle Housing Project
12:33 pm
Sun January 13, 2013

From Profanity Hill To Yesler Terrace

Demolition of house in 1940.
Credit Courtesy MOHAI

Rumor has it that somewhere in a forgotten corner of a basement somewhere in Seattle there's a decaying 3-D model of a brand new Yesler Terrace. It was dreamed up in the late 1960s but, like the R H Thomson Expressway or the parking lot that was planned for where the Pike Place Market still stands, it never made it out of the world of imagination and onto the grid of the real world.

In 2013, after six years of planning, it appears another vision of a brand new development will take root where Yesler Terrace now stands. It's not the first transformation this patch of ground has seen though. This is the story of two places that occupy that ground -- one in the present and one in the past.

Read more
Slavery In The Northwest
12:19 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Charles Mitchell: A Slave In Washington State

By the time Washington became a state in 1889, slavery had been abolished for nearly a quarter century. But there are a few documented cases of slavery in the Washington Territory. One is Charles Mitchell, who was born a slave and brought to the territory in 1853.

How did the 12-year-old escaped slave end up in Washington and why did his slavery cause a fight between Canada and the US? Ross Reynolds talks with storyteller Eva Abram to hear the story.

Race & Identity
9:00 am
Mon January 7, 2013

Gather At The Table: A Dialogue On Race

Sharon Leslie Morgan and Tom DeWolf are authors of 'Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade.'
Credit Kristin Little Photography

When you look at a person, do you "see race?" Sharon Leslie Morgan and Tom DeWolf have been asking that question as they sat down at dinner tables around America. They found the lingering pain of slavery, and some paths to healing. They join us for a conversation about the journey toward racial equality.

Read more
Author Interview
8:40 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Lessons For The Modern World From The Societies Of 'Yesterday'

In The World Until Yesterday, geography professor Jared Diamond asks: What can we learn from traditional societies?
Penguin Group

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:27 am

In his new book, The World Until Yesterday, Jared Diamond tells the story of a young schoolboy named Billy who was killed in a traffic accident on his way home from school in Papua New Guinea.

The driver was alert but simply couldn't stop the car when Billy ran across the road. In an outcome that may surprise people in many parts of the world, the incident was peacefully resolved within days.

Five days after the accident, Diamond explains, the employer and friends of the killer sat down for a meal with the relatives of the dead boy.

Read more

Pages