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Military
9:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Remembering The Iraq War

Marine Corps' Lima Company pay tribute to fallen soldiers at Haditha Dam in Iraq.
Credit Flickr Photo/James McCauley

March 19, 2013 marks 10 years since the beginning of the war in Iraq. A total of 3,489 Americans died in combat during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Nearly another 32,000 were wounded in action. The numbers obscure the thousands of individual stories from the War in Iraq. We hear stories of those who fought, worked and died in the war.

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Path To Citizenship
6:15 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

What Have We Learned From Past Immigration Reform?

Kindergarten teacher Sandra Aguila works on math skills with a Vietnamese student.
Credit KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle schoolteacher Sandra Aguila became a US citizen through the last major immigration reform bill, which President Ronald Reagan signed in 1986. Aguila had arrived in the US one year earlier at age 25. She spoke almost no English. “I could only say ‘good morning,’” she laughs.

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Historical Memoir
8:00 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Early Recollections Of Prague And War With Madeleine Albright

Former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright at an interactive session on "America, India and Democracy in the 21st Century" in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2006.
Credit AP Photo/Gurinder Osan

Madeleine Albright was the first woman to hold the Secretary of State position for former president Bill Clinton. She became known as an advocate for peace in the Middle East and for bringing war criminals to justice. In her new memoir, she chronicles her traumatic early life in Prague during the Nazi occupation, through the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War.

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Inventions
12:12 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Shining Light On The Age Of Edison

An original carbon-filament Edison lightbulb from 1879.
Flickr Photo/terren in Virginia

When Thomas Edison displayed the first lightbulbs the reaction was utter amazement. University of Tennessee history professor Ernest Freeberg talks with Ross Reynolds about how Edison’s wonder invented modern America.

Historical Curiosities
10:00 am
Tue March 12, 2013

The Curious Fates Of Famous Corpses

King Tutankhamun's mostly intact tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter and George Herbert. Global exhibitions of his tomb make the pharaoh a popular and well-known historical figure.
Credit Flickr Photo/Tutincommon

American culture loves celebrity. Magazines and television shows follow the lives of celebrities like an ongoing mini-series -- until they die. That’s when we typically set down one tale and start another. But the story doesn’t always end there. Some famous corpses had very curious fates. Seattle writer Bess Lovejoy is author of "Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses." She joins us.

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Museum Quality Memorabilia
9:27 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Cracking Open The Sonics’ Treasure Chest

MOHAI Registrar Kristin Halunen and Executive Director Leonard Garfield with a Sonics' 1978-79 championship banner
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

    

Correction: audio for this story differs from its original broadcast, which incorrectly identified Nate McMillan as a member of the Sonics championship team from 1979. We have also clarified the story to indicate that the two conference trophies in MOHAI's warehouse are not the only two won by the Sonics.

When the owners of the Seattle Sonics moved the team to Oklahoma City in 2008, basketball fans in Seattle were crushed. But they got one consolation prize: The team’s owners agreed to leave behind the Sonics’ cache of memorabilia.

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Home Improvement
9:00 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Home Repair Help With Roger Faris

Home painting projects often require the strategic decision of using paint rollers or paint brushes.
Credit Flickr Photo/Tiff Ku1

How’s your home improvement to-do list looking? Maybe you have some projects you've been meaning to get to? Weekday home repair expert Roger Faris joins us to take your questions. Call us at 206.543.5869 or send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

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Super Tchotchkes
6:37 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

The Five Best Sonics Souvenirs Ever

Coming in at number five, a photo of a photo of the Wheedle and his buddies.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

At least, the best pieces of memorabilia we’ve ever seen. Because the Museum of History and Industry let KUOW’s Deborah Wang peek at the stash that came into their hands as part of a settlement between the city of Seattle and Clay Bennett.

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Outdoors
10:00 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Greendays Gardening: Get Ready For Spring

Warming temperatures mean new flowers will begin blooming.
Credit Flickr Photo/Amanda Nichols

Daffodils are pushing through the soil, temperatures are going up (a little). Are you planning your garden?  How can you get the kids involved? Garden experts Greg Rabourn, Marty Wingate and Lisa Taylor are here to answer your questions. Call us at 206.543.5869 or send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

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Film
12:16 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

A Man, A Woman And A Gun: Seattle Noir Festival

Jean-Luc Godard used to say that all you needed to make a noir film was “a man, a woman and a gun.” Many movies still use that basic premise, but how do the Film Noir movies hold up some 60 years later?

Ross Reynolds talks with the "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller about the notoriously dark film genre, the role it plays in film today and the noir festival that kicks off in Seattle tonight.

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Celebrating The Past
5:00 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

New Life For Restored Memories From Seattle’s Female Rockers

Sarah Rudinoff in "These Streets."
Photo/Charles Peterson

You probably know the bands that put Seattle on the international music map in the early 1990s. Nirvana, Soundgarden and Pearl Jam have become legends, but they're only part of the Seattle music story. Women rocked the scene, too. Gretta Harley came to Seattle in 1990, looking for her tribe, and she says she found it.

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Culture
8:00 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Jared Diamond: Learning From Traditional Societies

Professor Jared Diamond lecturing at Maria Theresia College, Belgium, November 2008.
groucho Flickr

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jared Diamond joins Ross Reynolds in front of a live studio audience. For decades he has studied Papua New Guinea cultures. He writes about what we can learn from traditional social organizations in his new book "The World Until Yesterday." Below are highlights from the interview.

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Seattle Air Disaster
8:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

70 Years Ago: Remembering The Crash Of Boeing’s Superfortress

Firefighters and other emergency personnel respond to the crash of a B-29 prototype at the Frye Meat Packing Plant on February 18, 1943. A total of 32 died on the plane and in the fire.
Courtesy MOHAI/Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection

The Boeing Dreamliner was been grounded since Jan. 16 as authorities try to sort out problems with the plane’s high tech batteries and electrical system. Meanwhile, it was 70 years ago this coming week that an earlier Boeing plane caught fire over Seattle during a test flight, causing one of the worst air disasters in the city’s history.

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Religious History
8:00 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Muhammad's Extraordinary Life With Author Lesley Hazleton

Lesley Hazelton's "The First Muslim."
Credit courtesy/Riverhead

The name Muhammad is powerful and iconic, but what do we know about his life story? Lesley Hazleton brings Muhammad to life in this talk, recorded at Seattle's Town Hall on January 24, 2013.

Lesley Hazleton has written about the Middle East for The New York Times, The Nation, and Time magazine. Her most recent book is "The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad."

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End Of An Era
12:41 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

How To Pick A Pope (With Latin Subtitles)

Black smoke rises from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel on April 18, 2005. Black smoke signaled that the cardinals sequestered inside had failed to elect a new pope, after the death of Pope John Paul II.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 6:27 am

For lovers of the lapsed language Latin, the selection of a new pope is an ecstasyfest.

The Roman Catholic Church is so steeped in centuries-old traditions, Pope Benedict XVI announced his surprise retirement on Monday the old-fashioned way — in Latin.

"Fratres carissimi," the Pope's retirement announcement began. Beloved brothers ...

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