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History

The 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, D.C., and the women's march in Seattle on Saturday.
Library of Congress / KUOW photo/Joshua McNichols

In 1913, a lot of women were pissed at President Woodrow Wilson. So they marched on Washington. Wilson had just won the presidential election, but unlike one of his opponents, he opposed giving women the right to vote.

So women’s suffrage activists led by Alice Paul decided it was time for a protest march on Washington.


Donald Trump had already emerged as the likely presidential nominee of the Republican Party back in April when he gave a foreign policy speech pledging that "America First" would be "the major and overriding theme of my administration."

Does America have a divine origin?

Jan 12, 2017
Michael Medved speaking at the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.
FLICKR PHOTO/Gage Skidmore (CC by SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/kPpwPZ

Bill Radke speaks with conservative talk show host Michael Medved about his new book, "The American Miracle: Divine Providence in the Rise of the Republic." 

Some Americans believe that President Trump will restore this nation's greatness as God intended it. Medved is not a Trump supporter, but he does believe God has a plan for America. Medved believes the history of the United States is improbable and bizarre, which makes it easier to see where that divine providence guided the nation.

A Seattle tour map from 1965, two years after the U.S. Postal Service introduced ZIP codes. The ZIP codes were based on mail flow at that time.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives: https://flic.kr/p/8k5eCd

If you’ve ever had a reason to look up Seattle’s ZIP codes — and yes, being bored at work is a valid reason — you might have noticed some super-tiny codes downtown.

Clare Hollingworth, the war correspondent who told the world of the outbreak of World War II, has died at 105.

She died Tuesday evening in Hong Kong, according to long-time friend Cathy Hilborn Feng, who says Hollingworth "had a smile before she left us."

A Hopi mother, 1922. This image comes from The North American Indian by Edward S. Curtis, a Seattle based photographer.
Wikimedia Commons/Edward S. Curtis

    

SEATTLE (AP) — Philanthropist Harriet Bullitt has donated her rare collection of photographer Edward S.Curtis' work on tribal life in the early 20th century to The Seattle Public Library.

City Librarian Marcellus Turner says the library is "beyond honored" to receive the collection, called "The North American Indian." 

Curtis, the famed Seattle photographer who died in 1952, feared tribal traditions were vanishing and made it his life's work to document them.

White House 2014 World AIDS Day
Flickr Photo/Ted Eytan (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/2hT2Rem

Author David France faced the fear and reality of AIDS first hand as a gay man, an investigative reporter and a New Yorker. He was there when word of the illness spread through the gay community and was largely ignored by politicians, religious figures and the press.

He writes about that dark history and how a small group of activists forged a way out in “How To Survive A Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS.”

Dixy Lee Ray, Washington state's first female governor. She was a Democrat who wore knee-high white socks and men's shirts and who refused to pull punches.
Washington State Archives/Harold (Scotty) Sapiro

Dixy Lee Ray wore white knee-high socks and men's shirts.

And when she ran for governor of Washington state, her motto was "Little lady takes on big boys."

She was blunt and brash, an outsider who didn't play well with others, but there was never any doubt where she stood. Seattle historian Knute Berger spoke with KUOW's Bill Radke  that Dixy Lee Ray was a little like President-elect Donald Trump.

I escaped Nazi Germany. I see its ideology alive in America today

Dec 30, 2016
Franz W. Wasserman, 96, lives in Seattle. He was 12 when Hitler rose to power in Germany.
Courtesy of Margie Bone

A call to action:

I was born in Munich, Germany, in 1920. I lived there during the rise of the Nazi Party and left for the U.S.A. in 1938. 

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

President Obama and Japanese Minister Shinzo Abe made a historic appearance at Pearl Harbor, 75 years after the surprise attack that prompted U.S. entry into World War II, praising the reconciliation and partnership between their respective nations.

In a somber ceremony Tuesday, the two leaders touted the U.S.-Japan alliance that arose in the aftermath of the bitter conflict and became a "cornerstone of peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region," Obama said.

The bag Rose, a slave and mother, gave to her 9-year-old daughter the day she was sold away. They never saw each other again.
Courtesy of Middleton Place Foundation

For about $300, a 9-year-old girl named Ashley was sold as a slave.

Her mother, Rose, remained a house slave at a mansion in South Carolina.


Nooksack tribal police stand outside the courthouse during a disenrollment hearing in 2013.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

"Brother, brother, I need your help." 

That was the first thing Gabe Galanda heard when he picked up his phone four years ago. The women on the other end was a member of the Nooksack 306, a group the Nooksack Tribe has been working to disenroll.

Kennewick Man is an ancient skeleton found along the banks of the Columbia River by students in 1996. The discovery caused a legal battle between Northwest tribes and scientists. But now, President Barack Obama has signed a bill that requires the 9,000-year-old remains be returned to tribes within 90 days.

Several Northwest tribes are meeting this week with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and with the Washington state Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation to discuss the imminent reburial of the Ancient One, or Kennewick Man.

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Weekly reporter David Lewis about the Ballard Locks and the man behind their construction, Hiram M. Chittenden. Lewis has researched Chittenden and found that not only did he consider Native Americans genetically inferior, but the construction of the locks themselves drained a body of water sacred to them -- the Black River. 

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