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Genital Herpes
12:14 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Seattle Scientists Identify Cells That Could Lead To Herpes Vaccine

Scanning electron micrograph of a red blood cell (left), a platelet, and a T lymphocyte (T cell).
NCI-Frederick Photo

Scientists at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found a class of cells they think suppresses herpes. This could explain why some people have no symptoms or lesions when the virus is reactivated. It also changes the way scientists understand how the virus works.

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Suicide Rates
12:01 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Why Are More People Committing Suicide In The US?

A new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that suicide deaths have surpassed car deaths in the United States. According to the same report, suicide rates rose 15% from 1999 to 2010, with an even more dramatic rise among the 35-64 age group. Washington state has seen similar increases. Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Thomas Simon, a researcher at the CDC’s Injury Center in Atlanta about why the suicide rate is growing.

Weight Discrimination
11:44 am
Thu May 2, 2013

How Common Is Weight Discrimination In Washington State?

Flickr/Alex E. Proimos

A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that overweight patients are treated with less warmth than thinner patients by doctors. That kind of discrimination is not limited to the doctor’s office. Many overweight people say they face discrimination, mistreatment and bias in their daily lives.

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Connecting Violence To Health
7:46 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Seattle To Launch Gun Violence Study

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 32,000 people die from gun violence each year. The Seattle study will look at gun violence from a public health standpoint.
Credit Minnesota Historical Society / Flickr

The City of Seattle is about to embark on a new study that hasn’t been done in other American cities—to look at gun violence from a public health standpoint.

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Public Health
3:06 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

HIV Tests No Longer Just For High Risk Groups

A health worker drops blood from a sample on an HIV test strip in San Salvador, June 25, 2010.
AP Photo/Luis Romero

Every person between the ages of 15 and 65, regardless of risk factors, should get routinely tested for HIV. That’s the recommendation from the US Preventative Services Task Force, an independent panel of doctors and researchers.

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Labor Representation
12:18 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

SEIU: Fastest Growing Union Holds Strong In Washington

Nationwide, the percentage of workers who are in unions has dropped to around 11 percent according to January report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  That’s lowest rate in nearly a century. But the Service Employees International Union has been bucking the trend in recent decades – it’s the fastest growing union in the United States.

Since 1996, 1.2 million workers have joined SEIU nationally. Today, SEIU national represents 2.1 million.   Here in Washington state the SEUI has six locals with more than 100,000 members, up from about 40,000 in 2001. 

The union represents nurses, child care workers, public school employees and janitors.   Plus, Local 775 is the biggest, with around 43,000 members who are long-term care workers, home health aides, and nursing home aides.  

Ross Reynolds talks with David Rolfpresident of the Seattle-based Local 775 of the Service Employees International Union for health-care workers. 

Addiction
12:14 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Stories Of Sobriety

Flickr Photo/Joe Houghton

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence reports that in the US over 23 million people over the age of 12 are addicted to alcohol or other drugs. Not only that, a recent Columbia University study found that only 1 in 10 of these people actually seeks treatment for drug addiction. And most of the time, the treatment doesn’t work.

Ross Reynolds sits down with Dr. Jim Walsh, the medical director of Addiction Recovery Services at Swedish Medical Center’s Ballard campus to talk about what does work.

Science and Nature
10:00 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Placenta And Autism Risk, Vegan Before Six, And Greendays

Abnormal placental folds signal possible autism risk at birth.
Patrick Lynch, Yale University, 2013

Placenta Offers Insight Into Autism Risk
New autism research shows that babies born with a high genetic risk for the disorder were more likely to have abnormal folds and creases in their placentas.  However, Dr. Harvey Kliman says that it is much too early to say that an examination of the placenta could be used as a definitive test for autism at birth.

VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00 At Night
Could you eat vegan? If you could, research strongly suggests you’d be healthier, weigh less and perhaps even have a sharper brain. But could you find the discipline? Mark Bittman has a plan for you. The New York Times food columnist has written "VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00 To Lose Weight and Restore Your Health …. For Good."

What Plant, Where And When?
We are in the midst of plant-sale season. So how do you choose the perennial in spring that will survive the summer and look great next year? The Greendays gardening panel has some simple rules to follow for picking the right plant and taking care of it.

Public Health
7:05 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Consensus Builds For Universal HIV Testing

Katherine Tapp, 26, tries a rapid HIV test offered at the Department of Motor Vehicles in Washington, D.C., in June 2012. It's part of an effort to get more people screened.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 9:02 am

Everybody needs an HIV test, at least once.

That's the verdict from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which has just joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a scrum of professional medical societies in calling for universal testing for the virus that causes AIDS.

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Surgery
1:00 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Putting The Knife Under The Microscope: Ask The Plastic Surgeon

Gynecomastia surgery on a patient, before and after shot.
Courtesy Dr. Phil Haeck

When you think of plastic surgery maybe you think of best implants, botox or even facelifts, but there are surgeries that are happening more and more these days that you might have never even imagined. Ross Reynolds talks gynecomastia and labiaplasty with Northwest plastic surgeon, Dr. Phil Haeck.

Longevity
11:58 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Living To 100

Futurist Sonia Arrison speaking at the Singularity Summit, October 2011.
Flickr Photo/singularitysummit

Futurist Sonia Arrison believes the first person to live to 150 years has already been born. What will the rapidly evolving improvements in medicine and life extension mean for us, our society and the earth? What will living longer mean for careers, family and faith?

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Altruism
12:33 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Feeling Weighed Down By That Extra Kidney? Donate It!

Flickr Photo/Mika Marttila

The Mayo Clinic reports that around 45 percent of Americans say they are either very or somewhat likely to donate a kidney to someone they’ve never met. In 2001, that number was only 24 percent.

There are about 90,000 people in the US currently waiting for a kidney, and many others waiting for a different organ. Living donors are limited by what they can donate, either a kidney or small portion of a liver. Would you donate an organ?

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Ethics
11:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Should Companies Be Allowed To Not Consider Candidates Who Smoke?

Do smokers have protection under labor law?
Fetmano Flickr

In Washington state, it’s perfectly legal for employers to refuse to hire people who smoke. In 2006, state lawmakers tried but failed to join 29 other US states that made it illegal for employers to discriminate against smokers. 

According to the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, it’s legal for companies to ban smokers from their workforce because smokers are not protected by any wrongful termination laws.

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Young Adult Cancer Clinic
4:25 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Seattle Children’s Hospital Opens Nation’s First Cancer Clinic For Young Adults

Anna Stephens with her pet snake Evra. Anna's life has been on hold for the past four years since her tumor came back. She hopes to return to school again to study reptiles and amphibians.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Every four weeks, Anna Stephens comes to Seattle Children’s Hospital for chemotherapy. But she’s not a child. Stephens is 23 years old, and she’s one of thousands of young people with cancer who wind up being treated in facilities that typically deal with much younger or much older patients.

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