Health

Marcie Sillman speaks with Dr. Nathan White, an emergency room physician at Harborview Medical Center, about an injectable substance he created with UW bioengineers Suzie Pun and Leslie Chan. The product is in very early stages of testing, but White says it could help stop bleeding in trauma patients and save lives.

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Mar 23, 2015

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

The thinking about alcohol dependence used to be black and white. There was a belief that there were two kinds of drinkers: alcoholics and everyone else.

"But that dichotomy — yes or no, you have it or you don't — is inadequate," says Dr. John Mariani, who researches substance abuse at Columbia University. He says that the thinking has evolved, and that the field of psychiatry recognizes there's a spectrum.

As the Ebola epidemic in West Africa slows and falls from the headlines, there is a temptation among many to view this outbreak as an isolated event. In fact, the opposite is true. Ebola is the tip of a global health crisis: a crisis in our collective ability to deliver the essentials of modern medicine to those who need help the most, in the most timely and efficient manner.

It started in December 2013. A 2-year-old boy in Guinea was running a fever. He was vomiting. There was blood in his stool.

He was most likely "patient zero" — the first case in the Ebola outbreak that swept across West Africa.

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle, Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Why did the Starbucks race initiative bother us THAT much? Should you be able to smoke in a Seattle park? And should you fight wage discrimination by talking openly about how much money you make? (How much DO you make?)

Bill Radke analyzes this week’s top stories with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and The Stranger's Eli Sanders.

There's a researcher at the RAND Corporation who has been building a reputation as a curmudgeonly skeptic when it comes to trendy ways to fight America's obesity epidemic.

Nepal, a country of 25 million, is struggling out of poverty after a decadelong civil war. Squabbling politicians have paralyzed government, and high unemployment means 1,500 youth leave every day for jobs in Malaysia and the Middle East.

So, as the United Nations International Day of Happiness dawns, Nepalis may seem on the surface to have reason to be unhappy.

The story of how kale went from frumpy to trendy is a great inspiration to Gabriela Bradt, a fisheries specialist at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

"Nobody cared about kale. Then it became the green du jour," says Bradt.

Poop Water: Why You Should Drink It

Mar 19, 2015
Bill Gates challenges "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon to guess which is the poop water made in the Omni Processor.
Screenshot from YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Janicki, the Washington-based creator of the Omni Processor, a machine which turns human waste into clean drinking water.

Also, Reynolds speaks with psychologist Carol Nemeroff about the psychological aversion many people have to recycled water.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Department of Health educator Katie Wolt about who should get vaccinated for measles.

Spring is just around the corner, and with it comes more opportunities to be outside. Oregon lawmakers want children to slather on the sunscreen when they hit the playground.

A Better Way To Tax Cigarettes

Mar 18, 2015
Flickr Photo/David Grant

Bill Radke talks with Washington state Sen. Andy Hill, R-Redmond, about Governor Jay Inslee's proposal to raise cigarette taxes.

Malaria is one of the oldest scourges of mankind. Yet it's been a mystery how the deadliest form of the disease kills children.

One doctor in Michigan has dedicated her life to figuring that out. Now she and her team report their findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The key to solving the mystery was looking inside the brain.

Breast cancer: Radiographic marker in lumpectomy specimen
Flickr Photo/Ed Uthman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Joann Elmore, University of Washington professor of medicine, about the findings of her new study that suggest the results of breast cancer biopsy tests might not be accurate.

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