Health

A poster at Rainier Beach High School's teen clinic lets students know they have a safe place to talk.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

It used to be that students went to their school clinic to have their sore throat checked or get a vaccine. But many kids today have needs that go beyond physical health, whether it’s dealing with exposure to violence or having suicidal thoughts.

In response, a growing number of schools have started offering mental health services.

We hear it from smokers struggling to quit all the time: "If only they'd make it illegal, then I'd have to quit."

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about one of the legislature's priorities this session: mental health. 

When Amy Seitz got pregnant with her second child last year, she knew that being 35 years old meant there was an increased chance of chromosomal disorders like Down syndrome. She wanted to be screened, and she knew just what kind of screening she wanted — a test that's so new, some women and doctors don't quite realize what they've signed up for.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Paul Throne of the Washington State Department of Health about why some groups of Washingtonians decline to vaccinate against measles and what that means for the rest of the state.

Smoking tobacco
Flickr Photo/Laurence Currie-Clark (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state considers raising the minimum age to buy tobacco from 18 to 21 -- the highest in the country. Plus: deflated footballs, deflated employment at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Seattle’s cutest mobster and a sad farewell to talking about the Kalakala ferry. 

Bill Radke’s guests this week include KUOW reporter Deborah Wang, Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Jonathan Martin of the Seattle Times and KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy.

For someone who is blind, a simple click can be the sound of sight.

Seattle E.R. nurse Marc Bouma is back in the Northwest after treating Ebola patients in a remote part of Liberia.

Flickr Photo/Greg McMullin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist and author Steven Brill about his new book, "America’s Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Health Care System."

While finishing the book Brill had his chest sawed open for emergency heart surgery. A dream he had the night before the operation revealed a truth about the health care system. 

Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rob Ketcherside (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about how Virginia Mason Medical Center discovered a rare, drug-resistant bacteria that was spreading from patient to patient, and why they didn't inform the infected.

New Kidney Transplant Rules Aim For Equity

Jan 22, 2015

More than 100,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for a kidney transplant. That’s a longer waiting list than for any other organ. Each year, only about one-sixth of those patients will get one.

Who’s next in line is a delicate and high-stakes question and the answer has recently changed. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Joanna Richards of WCPN reports from Cleveland.

Thursday is Medical Cannabis Lobby Day at the Washington Capitol. State lawmakers say this is the year they will rein in the state’s “Wild West” medical pot industry.

Cigarette tobacco smoke
Flickr photo/Ta Duc (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with anti-smoking advocate Vince Willmore about the public health benefits of raising the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21. Willmore is vice president of communications for the Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids

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