Government

Pages

Secrets And Lies
11:57 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

FBI director J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington office, May 20, 1963. The 1971 burglary of one of the bureau's offices revealed the agency's domestic surveillance program.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 11:23 am

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

Read more
Workplace Safety
4:26 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Year After Cell Tower Climber Fell, Question Remains: Who To Blame?

Mike Rongey, 32, fell to his death last year because the cell phone tower he was climbing was unsafe.
Credit Courtesy of Jon Rogney

Last January, Mike Rongey, a seasoned climber, was assigned to climb a cell phone tower in Mount Vernon, Wash., to replace electronics that are part of the Clearwire wireless network.

Read more
Politics
2:50 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Looking Ahead: Congress Convenes For The New Year

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Marcie Sillman talks with DecodeDC's Andrea Seabrook about the new session of Congress and the future of long-term unemployment benefits, budget deals, immigration and partisan platforms. 

Local Government
2:50 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Seattle Politics 2014 And Inauguration Preview

Ed Murray will be inaugurated today as Seattle's next mayor.
Flickr Photo/Matt Westervelt

David Hyde speaks with Erica C. Barnett, news editor at Publicola, about Seattle politics and previews the inauguration of Seattle City Council member Kshama Sawant and Mayor Ed Murray. 

Minimum Wage
9:03 am
Mon January 6, 2014

What To Expect From Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee

Ross Reynolds interviews Howard Wright and David Rolf, co-chairs of Mayor Ed Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee designed to tackle the issue of a $15 minimum wage in Seattle.

Viaduct Project
4:11 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

What's Blocking Bertha? Probably An 8-Inch Steel Pipe

A glimpse of the steel pipe burrowing into Bertha.
Credit WSDOT Photo

An 8-inch-wide steel pipe.

That’s what is likely blocking Bertha, the boring machine creating a tunnel through downtown Seattle to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Read more
Transportation
2:56 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

SDOT Projects Depend Upon Bertha's Advance

Bertha carved just over 1,000 feet before getting stuck in December and has not moved since.
Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Transportation

Marcie Sillman talks with Jon Layzer, director of major projects for the Seattle Department of Transportation, about how city capital projects are intricately connected to the Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Program.

International News
2:45 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Egypt Prepares To Vote On Amendments To Constitution

Cairo, Egypt
Flickr Photo/Mitch Altman

Marcie Sillman talks with Haleh Esfandiari, director of the Middle East Program at the Wilson Center, about the bloc of amendments to the Egyptian constitution that will be voted on next week.

Week In Review
1:01 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

The Year Ahead: Boeing, Marijuana, And $15 Minimum Wage

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Machinists cast their votes tonight on Boeing's contract extension. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray proposes raising the minimum hourly wage for city employees to $15. Legal marijuana enters 2014 under a hazy cloud of questions.

Steve Scher reviews the week's big stories and looks ahead to 2014 with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, and C.R. Douglas of Q13 Fox. We also get some 2014 predictions from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
10:03 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Feds: Crude Oil Headed For Northwest Poses ‘Significant Risk’

BNSF Railway moves the majority of Bakken oil from North Dakota to refineries in the Northwest.
Flickr Photo/Roy Luck

An alert, issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation on Thursday said that the crude oil coming out of the Bakken formation of North Dakota poses a “significant risk” because it is more flammable than traditional heavy crude.

Read more
Unemployment Benefits
9:01 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Jobless In Seattle: Researcher Struggles To Get Back In The Market

Suzan Del Bene (left) held a round table discussion on unemployment benefits, January 2, 2014, at the WorkSource Affiliate Office at North Seattle Community College.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

More than 24,000 Washington residents lost their federal unemployment benefits late last month. Congress let expire an emergency federal jobless program that was created in 2008 during the great recession.

One Seattle researcher has been struggling to find work since last spring. 

Read more
Labor
2:39 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Raising The Minimum Wage: Why States Are Starting To Take Action

New York is another national city that has hosted rallies to raise the minimum wage to $15 like SeaTac, Wash., just did.
Flickr Photo/The All-Nite Images

Marcie Sillman talks with Jack Temple, a National Employment Law Project policy analyst, about the movement to raise the minimum wage and why states are starting to take action.

Prison
12:53 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Food As Punishment: Giving U.S. Inmates 'The Loaf' Persists

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:49 pm

In many prisons and jails across the U.S., punishment can come in the form of a bland, brownish lump. Known as nutraloaf, or simply "the loaf," it's fed day after day to inmates who throw food or, in some cases, get violent. Even though it meets nutritional guidelines, civil rights activists urge against the use of the brick-shaped meal.

Tasteless food as punishment is nothing new: Back in the 19th century, prisoners were given bread and water until they'd earned with good behavior the right to eat meat and cheese.

Read more

Pages