Government

Christy McDanold owns the Secret Garden Bookstore on Northwest Market Street. She bought her home in Ballard 20 years ago. Today, she says, she couldn't afford the house she lives in. "I couldn't afford a condo in Ballard today," she said.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The pressure is on in Seattle’s District 6 – pushing up rents for Fremont’s new tech workers, pushing in townhouses where Ballard’s bungalows once sat, pushing on maritime businesses along the waterfront.

The billboard that President Obama will see when he exits the airport in Nairobi on Friday says: "Welcome Home, Mr. President."

Obama's Kenyan roots have been a source of pride, but at times a source of discord, too, in the land of his father's birth.

For example, when Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency in 2008, Kenyans were ecstatic. His victory was declared a national holiday.

Since 2009, elections for a seat on the Port of Vancouver commission have been relatively low-key affairs. Candidates who ran for a six-year term on the three-member board that oversees the port have won their elections unopposed in the last three races.

That was then.

Now, a proposed energy project at the port has sparked interest in a race for an open seat on the commission, turning the primary election into a hotly-contested race.

The Army is not happy about armed civilians who have been appearing at recruiting stations in several states in the wake of the Chattanooga shootings, ostensibly to help guard against such attacks.

An interesting immigration case is winding its way through a federal court in Austin, Texas: A group of mothers has filed suit against the chief of the state's Department of State Health Services Vital Statistics Unit, because it has refused to give their U.S.-born children birth certificates.

The issue here is not whether or not these children are U.S. citizens. They are and that's made plain by the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which says most people born in the U.S. are automatically citizens.

Farms and fish aren’t the only ones suffering from Northwest drought conditions. So are trees and plants on Washington’s 435-acre Capitol campus.

Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters

The MacArthur Foundation, a prominent American non-governmental organization that has operated in Russia for more than two decades, is closing its Russia office as a result of government pressure on NGOs.

Hannah Webb, a resident of Seattle's Tent City 3 in Feb. 2015 on the campus of Seattle Pacific University
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to Matt Driscoll, columnist for The News Tribune, about why there are no tent cities in Tacoma to serve their homeless population. 

Medical marijuana and veterans activists plan to march in Olympia Wednesday to celebrate the addition of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury to the list of conditions that qualify for medical cannabis in Washington.

Seattle's proposed ban would apply to people lighting up tobacco products. Washington state law prohibits marijuana smoking in public places.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole says the police department could use help from city lawmakers about how the city should handle tickets for public marijuana use.

It's against state law to consume marijuana in public. And current policy requires officers to respond to complaints when people break that law.

This post has been updated to note that Kasich officially announced he's running.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich officially became the 16th candidate to officially enter the crowded race for the Republican presidential nomination on Tuesday.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata and Roger Valdez of Smart Growth Seattle about whether or not it is time for the city to intervene in rent prices, which have climbed faster here than anywhere in the country.

A seismogram of an earthquake off California.
U.S. Geological Survey

Ross Reynolds talks with Pacific Northwest Seismic Network director John Vidale about the challenges of creating an early warning system for earthquakes.

Courtesy of Azmat Khan/BuzzFeed News

The US war in Afghanistan has left behind a lot of statistics — many of them very grim. But one postitive number had jumped out: the number of kids enrolled in school.

The US has spent hundreds of millions of dollars over the past decade to build schools in war-torn Afghanistan. And, according to the US Agency for International Development, with good results. USAID says that, back in 2002, fewer than a million Afghan children were enrolled in school — none of them girls.

Today, USAID says more than 8 million young Afghans are attending schools including 2.5 million girls.

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