Government

blind justice law court
Flickr Photo/Scott* (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Susan Craighead, King County Superior Court presiding judge, about why she's pushing to eliminate racial disparities in King County's juvenile justice system.

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Calyn Holdaway, mother of three special needs students who have been physically restrained and isolated in Washington's public schools.

Also, we hear from Veronica Cook, a special education teacher in the Shoreline school district. 

Lawmakers say kids are physically restrained or isolated too often in public schools. A bill currently in front of the state legislature aims to address this issue by tightening regulations.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Jennifer Shaw, deputy director of the ACLU of Washington, about the ACLU's independent investigation of the Pasco Police Department's use of force trainings and policies after the shooting of an unarmed man last week.

According to the Idaho Supreme Court, an apparent error in Idaho’s legal code could make certain highway speed limits unenforceable.

This week’s fiery oil train derailment in West Virginia has lawmakers thinking about oil-by-rail safety through the Northwest. There has been a dramatic increase in oil trains traveling through the region to reach West coast refineries.

Kate Brown has been sworn in as Oregon's 38th governor.

A bill headed to the Idaho House would allow friends and family members of opioid drug users to obtain medication to counteract overdoses.

Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Roger Roffman, University of Washington professor emeritus, about the links between high potency marijuana and psychotic episodes.

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to news analyst Joni Balter about the progress the Housing Affordability and Livability Committee has made since it was formed by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in September.

A governor will take the oath of office for the second time in as many months in Oregon on Wednesday. Secretary of State Kate Brown will become the second woman to serve as the state's chief executive. She replaces fellow Democrat John Kitzhaber who is resigning amid a criminal ethics investigation.

The case of an infant who nearly died from severe abuse has captured the attention of Washington lawmakers. The child’s adoptive parents testified Tuesday in favor a proposed law named in their son’s honor.

Idaho lawmakers took the advice of doctors Tuesday on changes to a bill that would regulate abortion-inducing medication. Physicians said certain requirements in the original bill would be impossible to fulfill in some cases.

It’s no secret lead exposure is dangerous. Even low levels can affect a child’s brain.

It’s also no secret that airports are one of the last remaining sources of airborne lead in the U.S.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency attests to both these facts.

And yet, the EPA has yet to declare an “endangerment finding” for leaded aviation fuel. That means it hasn’t said whether those emissions pose enough of a threat to public health or welfare to trigger the long and complex process of regulating them.

The Oregon Senate voted Tuesday to extend the state's low-carbon fuel program despite objections from Republicans that the plan is tainted by the ethics scandal embroiling Gov. John Kitzhaber and first lady Cylvia Hayes.

Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, noted early in a three-hour debate over the bill that the low-carbon fuel program was called out specifically in a subpoena federal investigators issued to the state Friday regarding Kitzhaber and Hayes, his fiancee.

Legislative moves to limit school immunization exemptions are drawing vocal opposition from some parents. Opponents of mandatory vaccination crowded a public hearing at the state capitol in Olympia Tuesday, and the scene could repeat itself in Salem Wednesday.

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