Government

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz announced his bid for president early Monday. The Republican has been making the rounds with other 2016 hopefuls, so it's hardly a surprise, but he's the first major one to make it official. And if the early campaign trail is any indication of how the race will play out, Cruz, 44, will be exactly who he's always been. He's relatively new to public office, having been elected to the Senate in 2012. But he has made his career — and attracted support from the right's base along the way — as a staunch defender of conservative values.

Here's what you need to know:

The U.S. Supreme Court is tackling a question of great interest to America's auto-loving public: Whose speech is that on your specialty license plate? Specifically, when the government issues specialty tags at the behest of private groups or individuals, can it veto messages deemed offensive to others?

The Washington State Auditor’s office has released a federal grand jury subpoena it received earlier this month.

Federal agents searched the home of Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley on Monday. Now, the Democrat’s office confirms it turned over documents to the U.S. Department of Justice Thursday in response to a subpoena.

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle, Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Why did the Starbucks race initiative bother us THAT much? Should you be able to smoke in a Seattle park? And should you fight wage discrimination by talking openly about how much money you make? (How much DO you make?)

Bill Radke analyzes this week’s top stories with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and The Stranger's Eli Sanders.

marijuana
Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the Alaska State Legislature's debates over new marijuana regulation laws.

When Online Rants Become Criminal Acts

Mar 20, 2015
Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Green, First Amendment attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about social media rants and when online comments cross the line from hyperbole to a criminal act. 

Several hundred gambling devices in Idaho would become illegal under a bill now headed to the House floor.

Asha Gobana says a man pointed a gun at her and made anti-Muslim threats.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones / KUOW

A Muslim advocacy group in Seattle wants the FBI to investigate a possible hate crime against a woman in SeaTac. The group says it’s concerned about a recent spate of similar incidents, as KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

The Washington state Auditor’s office says it’s turned over documents to the Department of Justice in response to a subpoena.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Washington State Department of Health educator Katie Wolt about who should get vaccinated for measles.

A bill that would establish an expectation for Idaho schools to intervene when a kid is bullied is headed to the Idaho House floor.

Spring is just around the corner, and with it comes more opportunities to be outside. Oregon lawmakers want children to slather on the sunscreen when they hit the playground.

It's a recent morning out in California's Mojave Desert, and Marine Lance Cpls. Paula Pineda and Julia Carroll are struggling to pick up and maneuver Carl. He's a 220-pound dummy, and a stand-in for a wounded Marine.

Carroll's knees buckle for a moment, but as a dusty wind picks up, the two women pull Carl off their light armored vehicle. They carry him to safety, careful not to let his head drag on the rocky ground.

Both women are out of breath.

Pineda is 5 foot 2. On the back of her helmet is a piece of masking tape with the words "Mad Max."

Monday morning in Tacoma Troy Kelley's neighbors heard a knock on the Washington state auditor's door. Agents of the U.S. Treasury Department announced themselves, entered through the front door and searched his home for about five hours. Kelley's office submitted documents in response to a federal subpoena Thursday.

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